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Hattie’s synthesis of problem-based learning and problem-solving teaching. In a previous post I critiqued John Hattie’s analysis of inquiry-based teaching as reported in his book Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement.

Hattie’s synthesis of problem-based learning and problem-solving teaching

In this post, I critique his analysis of problem-based learning and problem-solving teaching. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an inquiry approach. A PBL cycle starts with a real-world, authentic problem, and involves gathering information and using it to solve the problem. Problem-based learning is underpinned by problem-solving skills and processes. However, problem-solving per se doesn’t necessarily involve problem-based learning. When you teach for problem-solving you concentrate on helping learners to acquire the knowledge, understandings and skills that are useful for solving problems (you provide them with the foundation for later problem-solving). Killen (2014) contrasts the examples of teaching students how to solve maths word problems versus planning and conducting an OH&S audit of their school.

McGill Journal of Education. MJE promotes an international, multidisciplinary discussion of issues in the field of educational research, theory, and practice / La Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill favorise les échanges internationaux et plu­ridisciplinaires sur les sujets relevant de la recherche, de la théorie et de la pratique de l'éducation.

McGill Journal of Education

The MJE publishes three issues a year. Generally, two of those issues are regular issues for which we welcome submissions at all times. We also publish special issues; calls for papers appear below. / Le MJE publie trois numéros par année. En général deux de ceux-ci sont des numéros réguliers pour lesquels nous recevons les propositions d’article en tout temps. Nous publions aussi des numéros spéciaux dont les annonces paraissent ci-dessous. Editorial Team / Équipe éditoriale : Teresa Strong-Wilson (Editor-in-Chief); Anila Asghar, Marc-André Ethier & David Lefrançois (Associate Editors); Mindy Carter & Lisa Starr (Assistant Editors); Sylvie Wald (Managing Editor) John Hattie et le Saint Graal de l’enseignement  John Hattie, un chercheur australien, a publié en 2009 un ouvrage, « Visible Learning », dont l’éditeur a fièrement rajouté sur la couverture de certaines rééditions un extrait d’un article du Times Education (2008) titré « Research reveals teaching’s Holy Grail », ce qui peut être traduit par « une recherche révèle le Saint Graal de l’enseignement ».

John Hattie et le Saint Graal de l’enseignement 

On ne saurait mieux indiquer comment ce travail et devenu un modèle de « bonne » recherche sur l’éducation, ce qui justifie qu’on lui consacre une série d’articles pour mieux en cerner l’intérêt et les limites. La raison de cet emballement pour Visible Learning réside en premier lieu dans la forme de ce travail, qui synthétise environ 800 méta-analyses, représentant plus de 50000 études, portant sur des millions d’élèves, dans l’objectif d’identifier les facteurs de la réussite scolaire.

Hattie’s analysis of inquiry-based teaching. In his influential book Visible Learning, John Hattie presents his synthesis of over 800 meta-analysis papers of impacts upon student achievement.

Hattie’s analysis of inquiry-based teaching

On a number of occasions teachers and teacher-librarians have told me that when they have advocated for inquiry learning approaches at their school, their senior administrators have not been supportive, citing Hattie’s research as showing that inquiry learning is ineffective. As someone who sees inquiry learning as powerful, higher order, authentic learning, I was dismayed at this news. Invisible Learnings? A Commentary on John Hattie's book: Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Home » Invisible Learnings?

Invisible Learnings? A Commentary on John Hattie's book: Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement

A Commentary on John Hattie's book: Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies;2009, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p93 Academic Journal. Effective debate: in defence of John Hattie. It seems slightly incongruous to be writing a defence of John Hattie.

Effective debate: in defence of John Hattie

Given that he is one of the most successful researchers in education today, you might reasonably assume that his voice requires no amplification. The winner of numerous awards, Hattie has held a number of professorships, leads a new, multi-million dollar Science of Research Learning Centre at the University of Melbourne, is an ACEL and APA fellow, has authored over 850 papers, a number of books—including Visible Learning (2008)—and was appointed last year as the new Chair of AITSL.

John Hattie admits that half of the Statistics in Visible Learning are wrong. At the researchED conference in September 2013, Professor Robert Coe, Professor of Education at Durham University, said that John Hattie’s book, ‘Visible Learning’, is “riddled with errors”.

John Hattie admits that half of the Statistics in Visible Learning are wrong

But what are some of those errors? The biggest mistake Hattie makes is with the CLE statistic that he uses throughout the book. In ‘Visible Learning, Hattie only uses two statistics, the ‘Effect Size’ and the CLE (neither of which Mathematicians use). The CLE is meant to be a probability, yet Hattie has it at values between -49% and 219%. Now a probability can’t be negative or more than 100% as any Year 7 will tell you. This was first spotted and pointed out to him by Arne Kare Topphol, an Associate Professor at the University of Volda and his class who sent Hattie an email.

In his first reply – here , Hattie completely misses the point about probability being negative and claims he actually used a different version of the CLE than the one he actually referenced (by McGraw and Wong). Hattie Ranking: Teaching Effects. PPTA - Academics put heat on half-baked reactions. PPTA News, April 2009 p.4 The political and media stir caused by professor John Hattie's research on student achievement has prompted a group of academics to look closely at his work.

PPTA - Academics put heat on half-baked reactions

The authors were particularly concerned that politicians might use Hattie's work to justify ill-informed policy decisions. Massey university academics Ivan Snook, John Clark, Richard Harker, Anne-Marie O'Neill and John O'Neill banded together to produce Invisible Learnings?