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Forensic photography. Footwear impressions left at a crime scene.

Forensic photography

Methods[edit] Skid mark from faulty ladder. Photomicrography Competition. Scientific photography - Photography - Library Subject Guides at RMIT University. Compound Eye: the many facets of science photography. A compound eye is a visual sensory organ composed of numerous small lenses.

Compound Eye: the many facets of science photography

This charming South American grasshopper sports an especially large pair. Welcome to Compound Eye, a Scientific American photography blog! The blog is new, but the blogger is not. My name is Alex Wild. I am an entomologist and nature photographer based in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, and I have been writing about insects, science, and photography at Myrmecos Blog since 2007. Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc. Microscopy and Science Education Web Site. Special Report - International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. Thank you for your interest in the International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge.

Special Report - International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

We are in the process of restructuring the Visualization Challenge. We will begin accepting entries in September 2014. Please visit this site periodically for updates. Some of science's most powerful statements are not made in words. View Forum - Technical and scientific photography. Medical and Scientific Photography Home Page. Pioneers of Invisible Radiation Photography - Contents. About | articles | authors | contact | links Home > Articles > Pioneers of invisible radiation photography > Table of Contents Authors: Prof.

Pioneers of Invisible Radiation Photography - Contents

Robin Williams and Gigi Williams. Infrared Photography - Contents. About | articles | authors | contact | links Home > Articles > Infrared Photography > Table of Contents Authors: Prof.

Infrared Photography - Contents

Robin Williams and Gigi Williams Contents Acknowledgments. Reflected Ultraviolet Photography - Contents. About | articles | authors | contact | links Home > Articles > Reflected Ultraviolet Photography > Contents Authors: Prof.

Reflected Ultraviolet Photography - Contents

Fluorescence Photography - Contents. About | articles | authors | contact | links Home > Articles > Fluorescence Photography > Table of Contents Authors: Prof.

Fluorescence Photography - Contents

Concursul de Fotografie Stiintifica de MILSET - Pagina iniţială. Science Photo Library. Scientific Photography. Scientific photography is about visualizing things that can't be seen with the unaided eye.

Scientific Photography

It is used to describe natural and man-made phenomena in a way that clarifies, educates, and illuminates. Through scientific photography, we can describe things to other scientists, but also to the public, which in many cases supports the research with its tax money. Science photography that is beautiful and otherwise aesthetically pleasing is able to capture the imagination of the viewer to a degree unlike any other style of photography. Something about images of things never scene before: witness the fascination with the remarkable space photographs brought back by the Hubble telescope. Science Photography Spotlight. On January 7, 1839, an installation artist and chemist named Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre announced to the French Academy of Sciences in Paris that he had perfected a photographic imaging technology that could be used on a large scale and was reproducible.

Science Photography Spotlight

His invention, later named the daguerreotype, was based on a special property of silver iodide: when exposed to light, the molecules undergo a chemical transformation that can be turned into charcoal-colored shadows and lines when later exposed to developing mercury fumes. The more intense the light, the darker the resulting silver-mercury amalgam. When a sheet of metal copper coated with silver iodide, for instance, was exposed to a street scene for a prolonged period, an image of the street was represented on the daguerreotype plate as lines and shadows of varying brightness. Daguerre initially thought his invention would be suitable mostly for personal use in travel logs, art installations, and architectural records.