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Energy Literacy

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Energy Science Made Simple...Ben Wiens...innovation consultant...innovating through synergy...value innovation, theory, applications, physics, chemistry, biology, wavicle, field, substratum, thermodynamics, temperature, force, entropy, perpetual, motion, Fig 3 Major theories of how the universe behaves 5. REASONS FOR A THEORY OF EVERYTHING It is a well known fact that Einstein's Special Relativity and General Relativity are not complete theories of the universe. They explain nothing of how the microscopic world of energy relates. Einstein is also father of the Quantum theory which describes how energy is exchanged on the microscopic level as vibrating particles. It is interesting however that even Einstein, who developed both the Relativity and Quantum theories, did not ever combine the two together. Each of the theories explains a part of how the universe operates by using models that are valid only in a very limited sense.

Fig 4 Einstein rarely mentioned details of the space continuum that energy travels in One of the major things that is missing from most of the theories is, what fills space. 6. Fig 5 The energy in each photon is related to its wavicle-frequency relative to the space continuum 9. Fossil Fuels Archives - IER. Fossil fuels—coal, petroleum oil, and natural gas — are concentrated organic compounds found in the Earth’s crust. Fossil fuels make modern life possible. The Institute for Energy Research conducts in-depth economic and policy research on energy and environmental issues.

The follow studies provide an extensive analysis of fossil fuels as an energy resource, their impact on markets, and their importance in energy policy debates. Below these studies is an in-depth overview of fossil fuels. Fossil fuels—coal, petroleum (oil), and natural gas — are concentrated organic compounds found in the Earth’s crust. They are created from the remains of plants and animals that lived millions of years ago in the form of concentrated biomass.

According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), fossil fuels meet around 82 percent [i] of U.S. energy demand. Fossil fuels make modern life possible. Scattered records of the use of coal date to at least 1100 BC. Fossil Fuels Today: Oil, By the Barrel. US Reports 'Unprecedented' Success With Methane Hydrate. U.S. Geological Survey Scientists have been studying methane hydrates for years, including this drill used to estimate how much there might be under the Arctic permafrost. Could the future of cleaner fossil fuel really be frozen crystals now trapped in ocean sediments and under permafrost? Backed by an oil industry giant, the Obama administration recently tested a drilling technique in Alaska's Arctic that it says might eventually unlock "a vast, entirely untapped resource that holds enormous potential for U.S. economic and energy security. " Some experts believe the reserves could provide domestic fuel for hundreds of years to come.

U.S. Natural gas is released from methane hydrates. Those crystals, known as methane hydrates, contain natural gas but so far releasing that fuel has been an expensive proposition. "You're storing the CO2, and also liberating the natural gas," Christopher Smith, the Energy Department's oil and natural gas deputy assistant secretary, told msnbc.com. Sen. U.S. Program. What lessons from the IT revolution should inform the future of energy technology? How can the information and communication technology industry address the energy issues it faces? Moderator - Vint Cerf, Google, Vice President and Chief Internet EvangelistAnita Jones, University of Virginia, Professor; ATS Corporation, DirectorShwetak Patel, University of Washington, Assistant ProfessorGeorge Rittenhouse, Alcatel-Lucent, Chief Operating Officer, Software, Services, and Solutions GroupS. Shankar Sastry, University of California, Berkeley, Roy W. Carlson Professor and Dean of Engineering.

2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. DOE - Fossil Energy: DOE - Fossil Energy: How Fossil Fuels Were Formed. Contrary to what many people believe, fossil fuels are not the remains of dead dinosaurs. In fact, most of the fossil fuels we find today were formed millions of years before the first dinosaurs. Fossil fuels, however, were once alive! They were formed from prehistoric plants and animals that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. Think about what the Earth must have looked like 300 million years or so ago. The land masses we live on today were just forming. There were swamps and bogs everywhere. The climate was warmer. When these ancient living things died, they decomposed and became buried under layers and layers of mud, rock, and sand. During the millions of years that passed, the dead plants and animals slowly decomposed into organic materials and formed fossil fuels.

For example, oil and natural gas were created from organisms that lived in the water and were buried under ocean or river sediments. The same types of forces also created coal, but there are a few differences. Solar cell. Solar cells can be used in devices such as this portable monocrystalline solar charger. A monocrystalline solar cell A solar cell (also called a photovoltaic cell) is an electrical device that converts the energy of light directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. It is a form of photoelectric cell (in that its electrical characteristics—e.g. current, voltage, or resistance—vary when light is incident upon it) which, when exposed to light, can generate and support an electric current without being attached to any external voltage source, but do require an external load for power consumption. The term "photovoltaic" comes from the Greek φῶς (phōs) meaning "light", and from "volt", the unit of electro-motive force, the volt, which in turn comes from the last name of the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta, inventor of the battery (electrochemical cell).

The term "photo-voltaic" has been in use in English since 1849.[1] Building block of a solar panel[edit] Dr. [edit] Theory[edit] Solar Panel Comparison, Most Efficient Solar Panels. Where to Get Solar Panels Solar panels are the future and there’s no better time to get solar panels installed on your home or building. The founder of PayPal, SpaceX, and Tesla Motors, Elon Musk, is confident that “solar will beat everything, hands down, including natural gas.” The only question now is, “where can I get solar panels for myself?”

The answer is simply to contact a handful of solar installers in your area and pick the one you trust most. The problem is, how do you know if the installer is good or not? These are the first recommendations I would give my Mom or Dad if they asked me to recommend a solar installer for them. This is a list of a few of the biggest, most reputable companies helping customers install solar in the major solar markets in the United States. Read the rest of this entry » Top 26 Most Efficient Solar Inverters Of the top 26 most efficient solar inverters 20 are SMA inverters. Read the rest of this entry » Top 10 Most Popular Solar Panel Manufacturers 1. 1. Renewable Energy. Renewables_overview. Hydroelectric Power: How it works, USGS Water Science for Schools. So just how do we get electricity from water? Actually, hydroelectric and coal-fired power plants produce electricity in a similar way.

In both cases a power source is used to turn a propeller-like piece called a turbine, which then turns a metal shaft in an electric generator, which is the motor that produces electricity. A coal-fired power plant uses steam to turn the turbine blades; whereas a hydroelectric plant uses falling water to turn the turbine. The results are the same. Take a look at this diagram (courtesy of the Tennessee Valley Authority) of a hydroelectric power plant to see the details: The theory is to build a dam on a large river that has a large drop in elevation (there are not many hydroelectric plants in Kansas or Florida). This diagram of a hydroelectric generator is courtesy of U.S. As to how this generator works, the Corps of Engineers explains it this way: "A hydraulic turbine converts the energy of flowing water into mechanical energy. How Geothermal Energy Works. Heat from the earth can be used as an energy source in many ways, from large and complex power stations to small and relatively simple pumping systems.

This heat energy, known as geothermal energy, can be found almost anywhere—as far away as remote deep wells in Indonesia and as close as the dirt in our backyards. Many regions of the world are already tapping geothermal energy as an affordable and sustainable solution to reducing dependence on fossil fuels, and the global warming and public health risks that result from their use. For example, as of 2013 more than 11,700 megawatts (MW) of large, utility-scale geothermal capacity was in operation globally, with another 11,700 MW in planned capacity additions on the way [1].

These geothermal facilities produced approximately 68 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity, enough to meet the annual needs of more than 6 million typical U.S. households. Iceland's Nesjavellir geothermal power station. The geothermal resource References: [2] U.S. How Do Wind Turbines Work. Have you ever wondered how wind turbines actually work? In this article we aim to explain the process that enables these devices to convert wind energy into useable electricity.

Wind turbines work in essentially the same way as an electric fan, however instead of using electricity to turn a fan which will create a gust, we are using wind energy (the gust) to turn a fan that will create electricity. The Inside of a Wind Turbine As you can see above, a wind turbine features a large compartment that the blades are attached to via a rotary device. This rotary device is often connected to a pitch system that is able to point the entire blade system either upwards or downwards in order to be more efficient during different wind patterns. Not only does this provide efficiency, but it also helps protect the turbine during periods of severe gales. The rotary device is connected to a shaft which will be linked to a gearbox. Where Does The Electricity Go? Details Written by James Bratley. Wind Program: How Wind Turbines Work. The Energy Story - Introduction. Energy is one of the most fundamental parts of our universe. We use energy to do work.

Energy lights our cities. Energy powers our vehicles, trains, planes and rockets. Energy warms our homes, cooks our food, plays our music, gives us pictures on television. Energy powers machinery in factories and tractors on a farm. Energy from the sun gives us light during the day. Everything we do is connected to energy in one form or another. Energy is defined as: "the ability to do work. " When we eat, our bodies transform the energy stored in the food into energy to do work. Cars, planes, light bulbs, boats and machinery also transform energy into work. Work means moving something, lifting something, warming something, lighting something. There are many sources of energy. The forms of energy we will look at include: Electricity We will also look at turbines and generators, at what electricity is, how energy is sent to users, and how we can decrease or conserve the energy we use.

The Energy Story - Chapter 6: Turbines, Generators and Power Plants. As we learned in Chapter 2, electricity flows through wires to light our lamps, run TVs, computers and all other electrical appliances. But where does the electricity come from? In this chapter, we'll learn how electricity is generated in a power plant. In the next few chapters, we'll learn about the various resources that are used to make the heat to produce electricity. In Chapter 7, we'll learn how the electricity gets from the power plant to homes, school and businesses. Thermal power plants have big boilers that burn a fuel to make heat. In most boilers, wood, coal, oil or natural gas is burned in a firebox to make heat. The top picture on the right is of a small power plant located at Michigan State University. In the second picture to the left, you'll see the turbine and generator at MSU's power plant. The third picture on the right is of the turbine fan before it is placed inside the turbine housing.

How the Generator Works All power plants have turbines and generators. Power Plants. Electricity is actually the flow or movement of electrons through a material. Electric generating plants typically produce electricity using magnetic conduction. This happens when a large number of conductive wires are spun around inside a magnetic field, causing electrons to move (i.e., electricity to flow). In a generating plant, the potential energy of various types of fuels (fossil, nuclear, or renewable) is converted into another form of energy (usually mechanical or heat energy).

This energy is used to turn fan-like blades inside a turbine. These blades are attached to a pole-like shaft. When the blades inside the turbine begin to turn, the shaft begins to turn. This causes wires located inside a magnetic field within the generator to turn. Wires coming from the generator are used to conduct the flow of electricity out to a neighboring switchyard, where the electricity is “stepped up” (i.e., the voltage is raised) so that it can be sent to customers.

Fossil Plants Nuclear Plants.

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Energy_Literacy_1.0_High_Res. Energy_Literacy_1.0_Low_Res. Fossil Fuels. The Institute for Energy Research conducts in-depth economic and policy research on energy and environmental issues. The follow studies provide an extensive analysis of fossil fuels as an energy resource, their impact on markets, and their importance in energy policy debates. Below these studies is an in-depth overview of fossil fuels. Fossil fuels—coal, petroleum (oil), and natural gas — are concentrated organic compounds found in the Earth’s crust. They are created from the remains of plants and animals that lived millions of years ago in the form of concentrated biomass. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), fossil fuels meet around 82 percent [i] of U.S. energy demand.

Fossil fuels make modern life possible. These huge sources of energy work to generate steam, electricity and power transportation systems. Scattered records of the use of coal date to at least 1100 BC. Fossil Fuels Today: Oil, By the Barrel Coal, by the “Short Ton” National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Home Page. Michael Mann, From The Trenches Of The 'Climate War' Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required. This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. This is the latest battle in the war over climate change, a war that my next guest, climatologist Michael Mann, knows all too well.

It's called "The Hockey Stick And The Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines. " MICHAEL MANN: Thanks, Ira, it's great to be here. FLATOW: Are you on vacation? MANN: No, I'm actually at a conference in Hawaii. FLATOW: So your book is just - is filled with just climate wars, over and over again. MANN: Sure. FLATOW: Now, you say that you're a reluctant entrant into this. MANN: Right. And so I got interested in the science of climate change. And that process, that sort of good faith give-and-take is part of the true skepticism that helps move science forward. MANN: Well, that's right. And that's - and science should be that way. FLATOW: Well, how do you better equip them, then? FLATOW: All right. U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Home Page. USGS Energy Resources Program > Energy Resources Program. Energy Sources.

EI | Research.