background preloader

Drea15

Facebook Twitter

Introducing This Is Fake, Slate’s tool for stopping fake news on Facebook. Photo illustration by Slate.

Introducing This Is Fake, Slate’s tool for stopping fake news on Facebook.

Photo by Medioimages/Photodisc. One of the more extreme symptoms of media dysfunction in the past several months has been the ascendance of “fake news”—fabricated news stories that purport to be factual. Lesson Idea: Media Literacy and Fake News. Overview: In a world filled with rapid pace communication through a variety of platforms, we have an abundance of information available at our fingertips.

Lesson Idea: Media Literacy and Fake News

Discerning fact from fiction can be complex. Lesson Idea: Media Literacy and Fake News. Media literacy courses help high school students spot fake news. Janis Shachter When the AP United States history students at Aragon High School in San Mateo, California, scanned the professionally designed pages of minimumwage.com, most concluded that it was a solid, unbiased source of facts and analysis.

Media literacy courses help high school students spot fake news.

They noted the menu of research reports, graphics and videos, and the “About” page describing the site as a project of a “nonprofit research organization” called the Employment Policies Institute. But then their teacher, Will Colglazier, demonstrated how a couple more exploratory clicks—critically, beyond the site itself—revealed the Employment Policies Institute is considered by the Center for Media and Democracy to be a front group created by lobbyists for the restaurant and hotel industries. “I have some bright students, and a lot of them felt chagrined that they weren’t able to deduce this,” said Colglazier, who videotaped the episode in January.

Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news. Fake news is making news, and it’s a problem.

Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news

Not only did a BuzzFeed data analysis find that viral stories falsely claiming that the Pope endorsed Donald Trump and that Hillary Clinton sold weapons to terrorists receive more Facebook attention than the most popular news stories from established news outlets, but a false story about child trafficking in a Washington, D.C. pizza restaurant inspired a North Carolina man to drive 5 hours with a shotgun and other weapons to investigate. This lesson gives students media literacy skills they need to navigate the media, including how to spot fake news.

Subjects. Fake News Antidote: Teaching Kids To Discern Fact From Fiction : NPR Ed. By now, you've probably heard about one very real consequence of fake news — the infamous "pizzagate" conspiracy theory that ended with Edgar Welch, 28, firing a real gun inside a real Washington, D.C., pizzeria filled with real people.

Fake News Antidote: Teaching Kids To Discern Fact From Fiction : NPR Ed

When The New York Times later asked Welch what he thought when he realized there were no child slaves inside the restaurant, as one fake news story had led him to believe, he responded: "The intel on this wasn't 100 percent. " Welch isn't the only one struggling to tell fact from fiction in this digital age. A recent Stanford study found that America's middle, high school and college students are shockingly bad at it, too. It's clear that something has to change in the nation's classrooms. That something, according to Professor Sam Wineburg, one of those Stanford researchers, is "practice. " 10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog. For many of us, 2016 is going down as a year to forget.

10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog

Election upsets, Zika, the Syrian crisis, and unfortunately tons of fake news about all of the above and everything in between. Denzel Washington was recently quoted as saying, “If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. Here’s How Fake News Works (and How the Internet Can Stop It) How to Spot Fake News. Fake news is nothing new.

How to Spot Fake News

But bogus stories can reach more people more quickly via social media than what good old-fashioned viral emails could accomplish in years past. Concern about the phenomenon led Facebook and Google to announce that they’ll crack down on fake news sites, restricting their ability to garner ad revenue. Perhaps that could dissipate the amount of malarkey online, though news consumers themselves are the best defense against the spread of misinformation. Not all of the misinformation being passed along online is complete fiction, though some of it is. Snopes.com has been exposing false viral claims since the mid 1990s, whether that’s fabricated messages, distortions containing bits of truth and everything in between.

How to Spot Fake News. Video: Spotting Fake News. FactCheck.org - A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center. Rumor has it. A decent breakdown of all things real and fake news. Fake News. Skip to main content Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda This guide offers a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it, and reading the news with a more informed eye A Visual Take.

Fake News