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Journal of Learning Disabilities

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Coping Styles and Strategies: A Comparison of Adolescent Students With and Without Learning Disabilities. Dyslexia and the Life Course. The life stories of adults diagnosed with dyslexia as children were examined, with emphasis on the related emotional experiences.

Dyslexia and the Life Course

The life story method of narrative analysis was used to compare and analyze the accounts of 12 participants who were interviewed extensively. The findings indicated that self-esteem problems may emerge by early childhood as individuals contend with aspects of their learning disabilities that interfere with typical development. How Teachers Would Spend Their Time Teaching Language Arts. The Mismatch Between Self-Reported and Best Practices Abstract As teacher quality becomes a central issue in discussions of children’s literacy, both researchers and policy makers alike express increasing concern with how teachers structure and allocate their lesson time for literacy-related activities as well as with what they know about reading development, processes, and pedagogy.

How Teachers Would Spend Their Time Teaching Language Arts

The authors examined the beliefs, literacy knowledge, and proposed instructional practices of 121 first-grade teachers. Learning Strategies and Study Approaches of Postsecondary Students With Dyslexia. Project DyAdd: Phonological Processing, Reading, Spelling, and Arithmetic in Adults With Dyslexia or ADHD. Pekka Tani Difficulties in phonological processing and reading that characterize developmental dyslexia have been suggested also to affect those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Project DyAdd: Phonological Processing, Reading, Spelling, and Arithmetic in Adults With Dyslexia or ADHD

However, it is not known to what extent various intervening factors, such as low intelligence quotient or age, explain the observed difficulties. Sound-Symbol Learning in Children with Dyslexia. Linda S.

Sound-Symbol Learning in Children with Dyslexia

Siegel This study evaluated the effect of sound-symbol association training on visual and phonological memory in children with a history of dyslexia. Pretests of phonological and visual memory, a sound-symbol training procedure, and phonological and visual memory posttests were administered to children with dyslexia, to children whose dyslexia had been compensated through remedial training, and to age- and reading level-matched comparison groups. Deficits in visual and phonological memory and memory for sound-symbol associations were demonstrated in the dyslexia group. The Role of Working Memory and Fluency Practice on the Reading Comprehension of Students Who Are Dysfluent Readers.

The authors investigated whether practice in reading fluency had a causal influence on the relationship between working memory (WM) and text comprehension for 155 students in Grades 2 and 4 who were poor or average readers.

The Role of Working Memory and Fluency Practice on the Reading Comprehension of Students Who Are Dysfluent Readers

Dysfluent readers were randomly assigned to repeated reading or continuous reading practice conditions and compared with untreated dysfluent and fluent readers on posttest measures of fluency, word identification, vocabulary, and reading comprehension. Three main findings emerged: (a) The influence of WM on text comprehension was not related to fluency training, (b) dysfluent readers in the continuous-reading condition had higher posttest scores than dysfluent readers in the other conditions on measures of text comprehension but not on vocabulary, and (c) individual differences in WM better predicted posttest comprehension performance than word-attack skills. . © 2009 Hammill Institute on Disabilities. Tip-of-the-Tongue and Word Retrieval Deficits in Dyslexia. Toward a Research-Based Assessment of Dyslexia. Using Cognitive Measures to Identify Reading Disabilities R.

Toward a Research-Based Assessment of Dyslexia

Steve McCallum Abstract. Working Memory, Strategy Knowledge, and Strategy Instruction in Children With Reading Disabilities. Two experiments investigated the effects of strategy knowledge and strategy training on the working memory (WM) performance in children (ages 10—11) with and without reading disabilities (RD).

Working Memory, Strategy Knowledge, and Strategy Instruction in Children With Reading Disabilities

Experiment 1 examined the relationship between strategy knowledge (stability of strategy choices) and WM performance as a function of initial, gain (cued), and maintenance conditions. WM performance was significantly improved for both groups under cued conditions; however, the performances of children with RD were inferior to those of children without RD across all memory conditions. Measures of WM capacity rather than strategy stability or processing efficiency best predicted reading comprehension performance.

Experiment 2 assessed the effects of strategy training on WM performance by randomly assigning children to strategy instruction or control conditions.