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3 reasons the American Revolution was a mistake. This July 4, let's not mince words: American independence in 1776 was a monumental mistake. We should be mourning the fact that we left the United Kingdom, not cheering it. Of course, evaluating the wisdom of the American Revolution means dealing with counterfactuals. As any historian would tell you, this is a messy business. We obviously can't be entirely sure how America would have fared if it had stayed in the British Empire longer, perhaps gaining independence a century or so later, along with Canada. But I'm reasonably confident a world in which the revolution never happened would be better than the one we live in now, for three main reasons: Slavery would've been abolished earlier, American Indians would've faced rampant persecution but not the outright ethnic cleansing Andrew Jackson and other American leaders perpetrated, and America would have a parliamentary system of government that makes policymaking easier and lessens the risk of democratic collapse.

History of United States of America - in Depth - Continued. Transcript of 1954 Oppenheimer Hearing Declassified in Full. The transcript of the momentous 1954 Atomic Energy Commission hearing that led the AEC to revoke the security clearance of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist who had led the Manhattan Project to produce the first atomic bomb, has now been declassified in full by the Department of Energy.

“The Department of Energy has re-reviewed the original transcript and is making available to the public, for the first time, the full text of the transcript in its original form,” according to a notice posted on Friday. The Oppenheimer hearing was a watershed event that signaled a crisis in the nuclear weapons bureaucracy and a fracturing of the early post-war national security consensus. Asked for his opinion of the proceedings at the time, Oppenheimer told an Associated Press reporter (cited by Philip Stern) that “People will study the record of this case and reach their own conclusions.

And so there is. The transcript has attracted intense scholarly attention even to some of its finer details. Department of Energy (DOE) OpenNet documents. USA: Rights & Liberties. To My Old Master. In 1864, after 32 long years in the service of his master, Jourdon Anderson and his wife, Amanda, escaped a life of slavery when Union Army soldiers freed them from the plantation on which they had been working so tirelessly. They grasped the opportunity with vigour, quickly moved to Ohio where Jourdon could find paid work with which to support his growing family, and didn’t look back.

Then, a year later, shortly after the end of the Civil War, Jourdon received a desperate letter from Patrick Henry Anderson, the man who used to own him, in which he was asked to return to work on the plantation and rescue his ailing business. Jourdon’s reply to the person who enslaved his family, dictated from his home on August 7th, is everything you could wish for, and quite rightly was subsequently reprinted in numerous newspapers. Jourdon Anderson never returned to Big Spring, Tennessee. He passed away in 1907, aged 81, and is buried alongside his wife who died six years later. What happened to the former slave that wrote his old master? Locked Away: How Ohio Schools Misuse Seclusion Rooms | Rights & Liberties. DOJ.

DEA

FBI. Hconres331.pdf. Iroquois Confederacy - History, Relations with non-native americans, Key issues. Overview The Iroquois Confederacy, an association of six linguistically related tribes in the northeastern woodlands, was a sophisticated society of some 5,500 people when the first white explorers encountered it at the beginning of the seventeenth century. The 1990 Census counted 49,038 Iroquois living in the United States, making them the country's eighth most populous Native American group.

Although Iroquoian tribes own seven reservations in New York state and one in Wisconsin, the majority of the people live off the reservations. An additional 5,000 Iroquois reside in Canada, where there are two Iroquoian reservations. The people are not averse to adopting new technology when it is beneficial, but they want to maintain their own traditional identity. The origin of the name Iroquois is uncertain, although it seems to have involved French adaptations of Indian words. The Mohawk called themselves Ganiengehaka, or "people of the flint country.

" Protecting the land is another priority. Iroquois Great Law of Peace (Kaianerekowa) The Great Law of Peace is the oldest constitution in North America defining a system of participatory democracy that has sustained the Iroquois Confederacy for perhaps 1,000 years. At a time of terrible war, say tribal elders, a Great Peacemaker emerged to inspire the warriors to bury their weapons of war (the origins of the saying, "to bury the hatchet").

The Peacemaker planted on top of the weapons a sacred Tree of Peace and established a code of laws called Kaianerekowa, the Great Law of Peace. Mohawk Wolf Clan Chief Jake Swamp explained: "The powerful story of the birth of democracy began long, long ago. In the beginning, when our Creator made humans, everything needed to survive was provided. Our Creator asked only one thing: 'Never forget to appreciate the gifts of Mother Earth.' "During the dark age of our history 1,000 years ago, humans no longer listened to the Original Instructions. Six historic accounts of the Great Law of Peace exist. Obama Ordered Wave of Cyberattacks Against Iran. The worm that turned: How Stuxnet helped heat up cyberarms race. IRIB Iranian TV via Reuters TV file Workers are seen in what was described by Iranian state television as the control room at a uranium enrichment facility in Natanz, Iran, in this image taken from video released on Feb. 15.

By Robert Windrem, Senior investigative producer, NBC News When the worm dubbed “Stuxnet” wriggled into public view in July 2010, computer security experts recognized almost immediately that it was no ordinary piece of malware. “This particular attack targets the industrial supervisory software SCADA,” Juraj Malcho, head of the Virus Lab at the Slovakia-based security firm ESET, wrote at the time. “In short, this is an example of malware-aided industrial espionage.” It took months of analysis before experts were able to identify the target of the cyberattack: Iran’s nuclear program. The worm, they discovered, was a powerful new tool for mayhem, capable of both surveillance and harming computers.

And it has raised the stakes in the race to create online weaponry. Executive Order -- Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. The White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release February 12, 2013 By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. Sec. 2. Sec. 3. Sec. 4. (b) The Secretary and the Attorney General, in coordination with the Director of National Intelligence, shall establish a process that rapidly disseminates the reports produced pursuant to section 4(a) of this order to the targeted entity. (c) To assist the owners and operators of critical infrastructure in protecting their systems from unauthorized access, exploitation, or harm, the Secretary, consistent with 6 U.S.C. 143 and in collaboration with the Secretary of Defense, shall, within 120 days of the date of this order, establish procedures to expand the Enhanced Cybersecurity Services program to all critical infrastructure sectors.

Sec. 5. Sec. 6. Sec. 7. Sec. 8. Sec. 9. Sec. 10. Sec. 11. Sec. 12. Ex-Pentagon general target of leak investigation, sources say. James Cartwright, a retired general and trusted member of President Barack Obama's national security team, has been informed that he's the target of a Justice Department criminal investigation into a leak about a covert cyberattack on Iran's nuclear program. NBCs Mike Isikoff reports. By Michael Isikoff, National Investigative Correspondent, NBC News Legal sources tell NBC News that the former second ranking officer in the U.S. military is now the target of a Justice Department investigation into a politically sensitive leak of classified information about a covert U.S. cyber attack on Iran’s nuclear program.

According to legal sources, Retired Marine Gen. James “Hoss” Cartwright, the former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has received a target letter informing him that he’s under investigation for allegedly leaking information about a massive attack using a computer virus named Stuxnet on Iran’s nuclear facilities.

Gen. Related story More from NBC News Investigations: America's Real Criminal Element: Lead. Illustration: Gérard DuBois When Rudy Giuliani ran for mayor of New York City in 1993, he campaigned on a platform of bringing down crime and making the city safe again. It was a comfortable position for a former federal prosecutor with a tough-guy image, but it was more than mere posturing. Since 1960, rape rates had nearly quadrupled, murder had quintupled, and robbery had grown fourteenfold. New Yorkers felt like they lived in a city under siege. Throughout the campaign, Giuliani embraced a theory of crime fighting called "broken windows," popularized a decade earlier by James Q.

Giuliani won the election, and he made good on his crime-fighting promises by selecting Boston police chief Bill Bratton as the NYPD's new commissioner. The results were dramatic. But even more remarkable is what happened next. All in all, it seemed to be a story with a happy ending, a triumph for Wilson and Kelling's theory and Giuliani and Bratton's practice. The PB Effect Did Lead Make You Dumber? Chris Hedges "Brace Yourself! The American Empire Is Over & The Descent Is Going To Be Horrifying!" The Right to Know, the Responsibility to Protect: State Actions Are Inadequate to Ensure Effective Disclosure of the Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Fracking.

Do you know how many natural gas wells are operating in your state or near the watershed that supplies your drinking water? You should. Most of those wells rely on a process known as hydraulic fracturing (or natural gas fracking) that employs toxic chemicals to crack open shale beds and release methane gas. Both the chemicals used in fracking and the methane gas released pose a risk to local water supplies and the health of those who live nearby. Click image to enlargeSource: Al Granberg/ProPublica Community groups, individual citizens, and public officials have a right to know which chemicals are used in the fracking process.

This report, The Right to Know, the Responsibility to Protect: State Actions Are Inadequate to Ensure Effective Disclosure of the Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Fracking, lays out what an effective chemical disclosure policy would look like, highlighting four key elements: Read the report in medium-resolution PDF format [6 MB] FDA staffers sue agency over surveillance of personal e-mail. Information garnered this way eventually contributed to the harassment or dismissal of all six of the FDA employees, the suit alleges. All had worked in an office responsible for reviewing devices for cancer screening and other purposes. Copies of the e-mails show that, starting in January 2009, the FDA intercepted communications with congressional staffers and draft versions of whistleblower complaints complete with editing notes in the margins. The agency also took electronic snapshots of the computer desktops of the FDA employees and reviewed documents they saved on the hard drives of their government computers.

FDA computers post a warning, visible when users log on, that they should have “no reasonable expectation of privacy” in any data passing through or stored on the system, and that the government may intercept any such data at any time for any lawful government purpose. “Who would have thought that they would have the nerve to be monitoring my communications to Congress?”

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