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10 Essential Freehand Drawing Exercises for Architects. The following excerpt was originally published in Natascha Meuser's Construction and Design Manual: Architecture Drawings (DOM Publishers).

10 Essential Freehand Drawing Exercises for Architects

With our industry's technological advances, "the designing architect is not simultaneously the drawing architect. " Meuser's manual aims to help architects develop and hone their technical drawing skills as the "practical basis and form of communication for architects, artists, and engineers. " Read on for ten freehand drawing exercises that tackle issues ranging from proportion and order to perspective and space.

What is beauty? Marta Colmenero illustrates Brutalist landmarks around the world. Spanish designer Marta Colmenero has created a set of illustrations that capture the concrete forms of brutalist architecture across the globe.

Marta Colmenero illustrates Brutalist landmarks around the world

The series features some of the world's best-known brutalist buildings, from Moshe Safdie's Habitat 67 to Le Corbusier's Unité d'Habitation. Commissioned by insurance comparison site Go Compare for its Concrete Feats microsite, Colmenero has illustrated nine structures in total, showing their distinctive forms and colours. The curved exterior of the Barbican Estate – designed in the 1950s by British firm Chamberlin, Powell and Bon – is shown, alongside London's Balfron Tower – a 27-storey slab block created by Hungarian-born architect Ernö Goldfinger. Colmenero's illustration features its distinctive connecting bridges, against a bright blue sky. ARCHIWINDOW: A Glimpse Through “The Eyes of Architecture”

ARCHIWINDOW: A Glimpse Through "The Eyes of Architecture" In his latest series, ARCHIWINDOW, Federico Babina draws some inspiration perhaps from the headline exhibition the Venice Biennale, investigating some of the most famous window designs architecture has to offer.

ARCHIWINDOW: A Glimpse Through “The Eyes of Architecture”

Babina simply says it is "a little reflection about architecture and the elements that compose it. " The images reveal how expressive the element of the window can be, as many of the 25 signature designs will be instantly recognizable for die-hard architecture fans, while others may reveal a previously-unrecognized trend in the work of a particular architect. Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again) Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again) Lima-based architect Karina Puente has a personal project: to illustrate each and every "invisible" city from Italo Calvino's 1972 novel.

Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again)

Her initial collection, which ArchDaily published in 2016, traced Cities and Memories. These Watercolors Capture the Unsung Architecture of Tokyo's Eclectic Storefronts. These Watercolors Capture the Unsung Architecture of Tokyo's Eclectic Storefronts A renowned symbol of the modern world, Tokyo is a city commonly associated with bright lights, innovative technology and sleek buildings.

These Watercolors Capture the Unsung Architecture of Tokyo's Eclectic Storefronts

So when Polish artist Mateusz Urbanowicz first moved to Tokyo, he was taken aback by the number of old, architecturally eclectic storefronts that continued to flourish within the city. “When I moved to Tokyo, more than 3 years ago I was really surprised that upon my walks I encountered so many shops still in business in really old buildings,” Urbanowicz explains. “Differently to Kobe, where the earthquake wiped out a lot of these old downtown houses and shops, in Tokyo they still survive.” Need Help With Basic Sketching Techniques? Let These Videos Teach You. Need Help With Basic Sketching Techniques?

Need Help With Basic Sketching Techniques? Let These Videos Teach You

Let These Videos Teach You We’ve all heard the story of the cocktail napkin sketch that inspired a masterwork. Architecture is all about communicating ideas visually, and there is no better way to quickly express an idea than through sketching. But for many students just starting on the path of architecture, the skills to actually create such sketches don't come naturally, and mentors who will take the time to explain such basics can be hard to find.

Geared towards young and aspiring architecture students, a new youtube channel, Themodmin, provides short, free tutorials on how to get the most out of your sketches in their series Architecture Daily Sketches. Fairy Tale Architecture Imagines Fantastical Homes of Beloved Characters. When two seemingly disparate subjects come together, they can produce a visual enchantment we would’ve never imagined otherwise.

Fairy Tale Architecture Imagines Fantastical Homes of Beloved Characters

Illustrator Federico Babina is known for his creative mashups like Archilife, which paired movie stars with homes designed by famous architects. He’s recently unveiled his latest series called Architale that’s in the same vein—this time, it focuses on fairy tale architecture. Babina describes it as “a tribute to the fairy tale universe where the architectures are reinvented to accommodate the protagonists of the story.” Architale features 17 charming homes of beloved characters like Peter Pan and Cinderella. If you’re familiar with their original stories, parts of Babina’s architecture will be instantly recognizable. Babina’s project hearkens his youth, from when these fairy tales transported him to new and mystical places. Federico Babina: Website | Instagram | Society6 h/t: [ArchDaily] All images via Federico Babina.

The Bare Essentials: 12 Minimalist Illustrations of Iconic Architecture. Yeah, we thought minimalist posters were done, too.

The Bare Essentials: 12 Minimalist Illustrations of Iconic Architecture

Still, though they're a little late to the game, these prints by Portuguese artist and illustrator André Chiote are intriguing in their own right. Chiote's work delivers everything we've come to expect (and smugly sneer at) from the design meme: simple geometric lines and bold colors that consume the entirety of the composition. Here, the modern and contemporary structures Chiote takes as his subjects are, for the most part, reduced to a few building details or formal snapshots.

These Intricate Illustrations Portray the Details of Fantastical Cities. These Intricate Illustrations Portray the Details of Fantastical Cities In the first installment of her series, “Cities and Memory - the Architecture and the City," architect Marta Vilarinho de Freitas created a set of intricately rendered architectural fantasy worlds that straddled the line between realism and abstraction.

These Intricate Illustrations Portray the Details of Fantastical Cities

Now Vilarinho de Freitas has returned with an additional 7 illustrations, this time experimenting with planimetrics and new cityscape scenes. In her drawings, she explores the relationship between detail and perception of the city, where negative space becomes as important to an architectural element’s presence and what is drawn. This Architect Fuses Art and Science by Hand Illustrating the Golden Ratio. This Architect Fuses Art and Science by Hand Illustrating the Golden Ratio Rafael Araujo is a Venezuelan architect and illustrator who at the age of fifteen began to observe intelligent patterns in nature, giving rise to his interest in the golden ratio located in our natural environment.

This Architect Fuses Art and Science by Hand Illustrating the Golden Ratio

More than 40 years later, the results of this hobby is a collection of beautiful illustrations of nature made entirely by hand, equipped with a pencil, a compass, a ruler and a protractor. The artist's illustrations give his ability to represent the mathematical brilliance of the natural world, inciting the reunion of humans with nature. Architects’ Sketchbooks: Oscar Niemeyer. Given the proliferation of digital tools and time-saving software now available, some believe sketching is losing its relevance. With this visual series, we celebrate the art of drawing by delving into the sketchbooks of designers, revealing some hidden gems along the way. To be considered for a feature, send your own sketches with a description of your design process to editorial@architizer.com.

This New Drawing App Shows How Digital Software Will Save Sketching, Not Destroy It. This New Drawing App Shows How Digital Software Will Save Sketching, Not Destroy It Mental Canvas is not the first software that attempts to save the act of sketching--we have seen 3D "sketching" tools such as SketchUp, as well as applications that simply simulate sketching on paper, such as Morpholio's popular range of sketching apps. But what makes Mental Canvas revolutionary is that you have the ability to sketch freely in a three-dimensional space without the constraints of traditional CAD modelling; it’s what Julie Dorsey, founder of Mental Canvas, calls a "graphical media"; not fully flat but not fully 3D.

Architects’ Sketchbooks: Steven Holl. Given the proliferation of digital tools and time-saving software now available, some believe architects no longer draw or sketch as they used to. With this visual series, we are out to prove otherwise by delving into the sketchbooks of designers, revealing some hidden gems in drawing, painting and sketching along the way. To be considered for a feature, send your own sketches with a description of your design process to editorial@architizer.com. First up on “Architects’ Sketchbooks,” we venture into the studio of renowned American architect Steven Holl, who is particularly renowned for his use of watercolors at the early stages of the design process. The architect said of his hand-painted works: “I used to do pencil drawings. Those took eight hours. Add To Collection Save this image to a collection Via Vladimir Paperny & Associates. Architects’ Sketchbooks: Le Corbusier.

Given the proliferation of digital tools and time-saving software now available, some believe sketching is losing its relevance. The Perfect Drawing: 8 Sensational Sections That Raise The Bar For Architectural Representation. It has now been more than 20 years since the demolition of Kowloon’s infamous Walled City. If one architectural positive came from this web of urban anarchy, it is that it was documented with extraordinary accuracy, utilizing one of the great modes of architectural representation: the cross section.

This extraordinarily complex slice through Hong Kong’s ungoverned, unplanned architectural oddity—a makeshift home for thousands of Chinese refugees following World War II—has to go down as one of the most jaw-dropping architectural drawings produced in the last century. A Japanese team meticulously surveyed the anarchic maze of walls, floors, and roofs—layer upon unregulated layer—before it was demolished in 1994. A cross section drawing of Kowloon's Walled City Detail from Walled City cross section. Fastcodesign. ¿Qué pasaría si estos músicos fueran arquitectos? Federico Babina ha lanzado su más reciente serie de ilustraciones: Archimusic, representaciones arquitectónicas de 27 canciones, desde Nirvana hasta Michael Jackson, pasando por Amy Winehouse. 1.

Miles Davis, “So what” 2. Concept SKETCH. Drawing ARCHITECTURE.