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On Nature. On Nature Travel Does Instituto Inhotim, a 240-hectare art park and botanical garden in south-east Brazil, represent a new kind of institutional operation?

On Nature

Chris Burden Beam Drop (1984/2008) I am on a parched hilltop some 60 miles from Belo Horizonte, south-east Brazil. Steep hills roll out before me. Galeria Adriana Varejão ‘Mr Tim’ (‘Ino–’ is local dialect for ‘señor’) was the nickname given to the man who used to farm the land that now comprises the 240-hectare art park and botanical garden, Instituto Inhotim. Hélio Oiticica Invençaõ da cor, Penetrável Magic Square No. 5 – De Luxe (The Invention of the Colour Penetrável Magic Square No. 5 – Deluxe) (1978) Inhotim sits just outside the town of Brumadinho in the Minas Gerais mining region.

Matthew Barney De Lama Lâmina (From Mud, A Blade) (2004–9) TerrorHaza.hu. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: metmuseum.org. The Getty. Home. Southbank Centre. Palazzo Grassi. Musée d'Art Moderne - Paris.fr. Tate Modern: International modern and contemporary art. The Museum of Modern Art. Palais de Tokyo.

Where dreams come true. Collectors Brazil Deep in the Brazilian jungle, Inhotim’s founder Bernardo Paz offers artists a place to realise their most ambitious projects By Cristina Ruiz.

Where dreams come true

Features, Issue 218, November 2010Published online: 22 November 2010 Lost in the jungle (from top): Matthew Barney's "De Lama Lamina" in a geodesic dome designed by Paula Zasnicoff Cardoso, Chris Burden's "Beam Drop" and Doug Aitken's "Sonic Pavilion" There is a place in the Brazilian jungle where artists are told to make their dreams come true. Allan Schwartzman, the New-York based adviser who serves as chief curator, tells the story of one project at Inhotim, a pavilion lost in the jungle containing a single work by Matthew Barney.

A geodesic dome designed by Paula Zasnicoff Cardoso of the Brazilian architectural practice Arquitetos Associados, was duly constructed and now contains De Lama Lâmina [From Mud, a Blade], 2004-08, which shows a vehicle uprooting a tree. Projects such as these inspire other artists who visit. Email* Inhotim. A “subversive Disneyland” at the end of the world.

Collectors Australia The gambling millionaire David Walsh is opening a museum in Tasmania that will be unlike anything you’ve ever seen before By Cristina Ruiz.

A “subversive Disneyland” at the end of the world

Features, Issue 215, July-August 2010Published online: 15 July 2010 Tasmanian collector David Walsh owns Jenny Saville's Matrix, 1999 (above), which he describes as "one of the pieces I like most" Imagine a museum that assaults every sense as you walk through its rooms. Imagine a museum that overturns virtually every accepted notion of institutional practice: an underground museum with no natural light, with a deliberately confusing design so visitors get lost as they wander through its halls, and a museum which, in places, is incredibly noisy and very, very smelly.

This is the vision of David Walsh, mathematician, professional gambler, vineyard and brewery owner, who describes his Museum of Old and New Art (Mona) currently nearing completion outside the Tasmanian capital Hobart, as both an “unmuseum” and a “subversive Disneyland”. Museum of Old and New Art.