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The Magic of Photoshop’s Content Aware Tools (And Practical Examples of How to Use It) Despite the fanfare over the introduction of content aware tools in Photoshop CS5, its predecessor, CS4 introduced the first real content aware tool in the form of scaling.

The Magic of Photoshop’s Content Aware Tools (And Practical Examples of How to Use It)

Content Aware tools have become a powerful and important part of modern photoshop work and can dramatically increase the speed at which certain tasks can be accomplished. It’s impossible to explain exactly how these tools work but put simply, as their name suggests, the tool analyses the areas around the point that you wish to work on, an by the use of complex algorithms, predicts how that part of the image should look when manipulated. In this tutorial we are going to have a practical look at three of Photoshops content aware tools, scaling, fill and move.

Lets start with scaling – This is a very interesting yet often underused tool. It allows you to simply resize only certain elements within an image. To do this, first we need to expand the canvas at the top. Expand the Canvas by Jason Row Photography, on Flickr. How to Use Drop Shadows in Photoshop. Photoshop layer styles are a popular way to add effects, such as drop shadows and strokes, to layers in a non-destructive way.

How to Use Drop Shadows in Photoshop

With the right knowledge and experience, any effect can be achieved. To achieve these effects, however, you need to understand what each setting does and how they can be combined to achieve a certain look. In this series by John Shaver from Design Panoply, we will explain every aspect of Photoshop's layer styles feature and show you how to unlock their potential. In this article, Part 2: How to Use Drop Shadows in Photoshop we will explain the Drop Shadow settings, what they each do, and how we can use them to create different effects. Let's take a look! What Are Drop Shadows Used For? The traditional use for a drop shadow is to simulate 3D depth in a 2D image. Below you will see an example of how a drop shadow can indicate how big the light source is and where it is coming from, as well as how far away an object is from the background.

Blend Mode Opacity Angle Size. A Guide to Guides (Part 1) Pixelmator is an easy-to-use, fast, and powerful image editing app for the Mac.

A Guide to Guides (Part 1)

In this tutorial,... Pixelmator is an easy-to-use, fast, and powerful image editing app for the Mac. In this tutorial, we will give you a brief introduction to Pixelmator. We will begin by taking a look at the Pixelmator workspace, show you how to create a new document, adjust Pixelmator's preferences, and how to do some work in Pixelmator by placing guides and aligning objects. How to Apply the Satin Setting to Layer Style Effects. Photoshop layer styles are a popular way to add effects, such as drop shadows and strokes, to layers in a non-destructive way.

How to Apply the Satin Setting to Layer Style Effects

With the right knowledge and experience, any effect can be achieved. To achieve these effects, however, you need to understand what each setting does and how they can be combined to create a certain look. In this series by John Shaver from Design Panoply, we will explain every aspect of Photoshop's layer styles feature and show you how to unlock their potential. In this article, Part 7: How to Apply the Satin Setting to Layer Style Effects, we will explain the settings behind Satin and the ways it can be used to create different effects.

Let's get started. The Uses For Satin Satin is one of the more obscure settings within Photoshop Layer Styles, but if you know how to use it, you can create a few different effects. In addition to creating a silk or satin look, it can also be used to add additional depth and even more realistic detail to glass and metal effects. The Spot Removal Tool in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC « Julieanne Kost's Blog. I mention a number of shortcuts that are new to the Spot Removal Tool (B) in this video (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), but thought that it might be handy to also include them in list form: • Tap the “V” key to toggle the visibility of the spot overlays. • Shift -drag constrains the brush spot to a horizontal or vertical stroke. • Shift -click connects the selected spot with the new spot via a straight brush stroke. • Command -drag (Mac) | Control -drag (Win) will create a circle spot and allow you to drag to define the source. • Tap the Forward Slash key (/) to select new source for existing circle or brush spot. • Press Delete to delete a selected spot. • Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a spot to delete it (the cursor will change to a pair of scissors). • Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) in the image area over multiple spots to batch-delete (the icon changes to a marquee while dragging. • Tap the “Y” key to toggle on/off Visualize spots.

The Spot Removal Tool in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC « Julieanne Kost's Blog

#CreativeFriday – Adding a Mask to a Locked Background Layer. #CreativeFriday – Content Aware Scale. I’d like to rejuvenate a feature that made it’s debut in Photoshop CS4.

#CreativeFriday – Content Aware Scale

Content Aware Scale was Adobe’s intro into the work of Content Aware Technology and it is still a great feature. Content Aware Scale is designed to support the re-size of an image whilst protecting important parts of it from the re-size operation. In the example I am using today i would like to re-size the image, however, I want to protect the hikers in the scene. If a regular transform operation is performed on the image, everything will be re-sized. To use the Content Aware Scale feature, Photoshop needs to know which areas to protect, in this case the hikers. There are many ways to select the hikers in the scene, but today will use a Quick Mask. Once the mask painting is complete, the image looks like the following Pressing the Q key will turn off Quick mask and create the selection (quick mask can be enabled at any time using the Q key and the mask can be easily modified).

How-To: Shoot Epic Landscape Photos Of the Night Sky. Growing up in New Jersey, photographer Ben Canales didn't have a lot of stars to look at.

How-To: Shoot Epic Landscape Photos Of the Night Sky

Now, however, he spends many nights out in the cold with his camera pointed towards the horizon, capturing the heavens and the land below them. He shared with us some crucial tips for getting amazing shots of the night sky. What do you look for in a location for shots of the stars? One of the first things you have to do is get away from the city. Whether you're traveling or at home, you have to go somewhere without light pollution. After that, I typically look for a landscape feature I can key on. One of the trickiest parts of a shot like this is balancing the foreground with the light of the stars. How do you manage the light of the moon?

No moon gives you the most clarity in the stars and the brightest milky wan and all that stuff. You have to have a pretty good understanding of the night sky to get shots like this. Darkskyfinder.org is useful as well. Photoshop Compositing Secrets: Extracting Hair. Home > Articles > Adobe Photoshop > Technique 📄 Contents If you've ever worked on compositing multiple graphical elements into one glorious image, you know how maddening it can be trying to make hair look as natural with a new background as it did in its original location.

Matt Kloskowski, author of Photoshop Compositing Secrets, shares some great tricks he uses to get even the wispiest of baby-fine hair to cooperate in Photoshop (no matter how badly it behaves in real life). If you want to get into Photoshop compositing, one of the first features you'll have to conquer is selections. If you've ever tried selecting people (especially people with wispy hair) from one background and placing them onto another background, you know that it can be a huge pain in the neck. Refining the Edges Refining the Radius Ready to Mask? Black and White with a Splash of Colour. Email One of the techniques people most often ask me to teach them is making a photograph like the one on the right that is black and white with one other colour.

Black and White with a Splash of Colour

There are a few ways to achieve this effect but here are two ones I find easiest for Photoshop users. The First Way 1) Open a suitable photograph, this can be any subject but ideally it needs an area of bright colour that will have an impact when it’s finished while the rest of the photo looks good in black and white. For example: 2) Then make a copy of a layer with the image. 3) Now go back to first layer with the image and turn it black and white using the “Black & White” button on the right side. 4) Select the Eraser Tool from the tool menu on the left of the screen (usually the fifth icon down in the right hand column), set hardness to 100% and choose a suitable eraser size to work with on the section of the photo you want to put in colour. The Second Way 1) Open the image you like in Photoshop.

And this is it! It’s that simple! A Complete Beginner’s Guide to Masking in Photoshop. Several years ago a friend of mine asked me to teach him how masks work in Photoshop.

A Complete Beginner’s Guide to Masking in Photoshop

This is my incredibly late response. We’ll go over the basics of what masks are, what they’re used for and how wielding them properly will take your Photoshop skills to an entirely new level. What Is a Mask? Layers are probably the single most important addition to Photoshop since the original version, but layer masks are a close second. I would posit that until you thoroughly understand how and why to use masks, you simply don’t understand the power of Photoshop.

The term “mask” isn’t immediately understandable to someone outside the realm of graphic design. There are two primary types of masks: clipping masks and layer masks. Layer Masks A layer mask is something that you apply to a given layer to control the transparency of that layer. When you add a mask to a layer, it covers the entire thing with an invisible grayscale canvas. With this in mind, try to imagine what the mask below would do to a layer: Photoshop Tutorials - Where Anyone Can Learn Photoshop. 20 Handy Photoshop Tips For a Faster Workflow. We all use Photoshop on a daily basis, but I bet there’s at least one tip in this post that will give you the old ‘Why didn’t I know of this before’ moment! It’s tips like these that make the most common of tasks quicker and easier than ever to help speed up your Photoshop workflow. Hold Spacebar to move a selection Drag a selection with the Marquee tool, but before releasing the mouse button, press and hold the Spacebar to relocate the selection.

Display larger font previews Go to Photoshop’s preferences and head down to the Type section. Change values with the cursor keys Rather than typing in an exact figure, simply nudge the numeric value up and down sequentially with the cursor keys. Quickly zoom back to 100% Double click the Zoom icon’s magnifying glass to jump back to 100%. Toggle visibility of multiply layers Click the ‘eye’ icon next to a layer to toggle the visibility on or off, then drag the selection down the palette to repeat the command on multiple layers. Toggle palette visibility. Photoshop Tutorial - How to Know if Your Image is Properly Isolated on White. How To Use The Pen Tool In Photoshop. Written by Steve Patterson.

How To Use The Pen Tool In Photoshop

When it comes to making selections in Photoshop, there’s really two types of people – those who know how to use the Pen Tool, and those who struggle. Most people put off learning how to use the Pen Tool for as long as possible, while others never get around to learning it, believing it’s just too confusing, too complicated, and just plain unnatural. Ultimately, their work in Photoshop suffers for it, since they’re stuck relying on the Lasso Tool for just about everything they can’t select with the Rectangular or Elliptical Marquee Tools. In this Adobe Photoshop tutorial, we’re going to put an end to the suffering. We’re going to learn just how easy it really is to make selections with the Pen Tool.

Now, when I say "easy", I don’t mean you’re going to read this tutorial and be instantly transformed into a Pen Master. One of the great things about the Pen Tool is that it’s not something that’s exclusive to Photoshop. Where Do I Find The Pen Tool? Pierre Bezier.