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Tiny House Communities

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Finally! Tiny home subdivisions and developments are becoming a reality. The problem with the tiny house movement has always been- where do you put them?

Finally! Tiny home subdivisions and developments are becoming a reality.

Because for most people, living is more than just a roof over your head, however small, but it’s important to be part of a community. If you are going to live in such a small space, it’s nice to have some shared resources, like a meeting room or a laundry. Everybody in the industry knows this; tiny home pioneer Jay Shafer calls it ” a contagious model for responsible, affordable, desirable housing.” But zoning codes across America prohibit them, concerned about property values and identifying them with trailer parks. Now it appears that it is finally happening. …to build the world’s first tiny-home subdivision and revolutionize the rural economy in the process. Boneyard Studios.

How tiny house communities can work for both the haves and the have nots. Ryan Mitchell lives and breathes tiny houses.

How tiny house communities can work for both the haves and the have nots

He has been running the popular website The Tiny Life for the past five years; is currently planning a tiny house conference for approximately 120 people in Charlotte, N.C., where he lives; and has written a book on tiny living that’s due to be published in July. To top it off, he recently finished construction on a tiny house of his very own. Mitchell’s dream, however, is a community of tiny houses. When asked what that would look like, he describes a grouping of mini-cottages around a large communal structure, which would include space to have shared meals, shows, and workshops. “The community aspect is actually a big part of what we [tiny house enthusiasts] like,” says Mitchell. How idyllic! Nevertheless, clusters of little huts in line with Mitchell’s vision are beginning to show their heads around the United States – though sprung from perhaps a different direction than he and the legions of tiny house followers might expect.

When it comes to tiny houses, it takes a village. Tiny houses are all the rage these days, as people look at the idea of living with less, without a mortgage, without the responsibility that comes with a bigger house.

When it comes to tiny houses, it takes a village

But as Eve Andrews writes in Grist, it's not easy. How tiny house communities can work for both the haves and the have nots. Top 5 Biggest Barriers To The Tiny House Movement. I was driving into work today when the idea came to me for this article.

Top 5 Biggest Barriers To The Tiny House Movement

Why does it have to be so difficult to achieve the life so many of us would love to live? There are no simple answers to our reasons, but we need to face them head on. Since I don’t like to focus on the negatives too much, my next post will be on some of the possible solutions and approaches to overcome these barriers. UPDATE: Here are the solutions to these: Part 1 and Part 2 Land.

Why Hasn't The Tiny House Movement Become A Big Thing? A Look At 5 Big Barriers. © Sustain.

Why Hasn't The Tiny House Movement Become A Big Thing? A Look At 5 Big Barriers

Tiny House Village. We have been talking with Sonoma County’s zoning department about building a tiny house village.

Tiny House Village

The officials seem to love this idea as much as we do, so we’ve started investigating some of the details involved and taking concrete steps to make it all happen. In many ways, tiny houses work best in concert with other tiny houses and shared amenities. This is a dream long-shared by many including myself. The place will be zoned as an R.V. park, but will look and feel more like the concept drawings I’m presenting to the left.

I’ve used the same design principles that go into each of my tiny house designs to create an environment that feels contained but not confining—vibrant but not at all crowded. This village will be structured as something like a co-op. I have no doubt that this will be the most beautiful "trailer park" in the world. Napoleon Complex is a Community for the Tiny House Movement. The Cold, Hard Lessons of Mobile Home U. “Don’t get too hung up on appearances,” Frank Rolfe reminded us as our tour bus made its way to the first of several trailer parks we would visit on a bright Saturday afternoon in Southern California. “Remember, you don’t have to live in these homes.” It was Day 2 of Mobile Home University, an intensive, three-day course on how to strike it rich in the trailer-park business.

Seventy-five or so students had signed up for the class, which Rolfe offers every other month in different places around the country. Most of the enrollees weren’t real estate speculators; they were jittery members of a hard-pressed middle class. They were nervous about retirement. Continue reading the main story ‘The trailer park is people’s last resort, and we recognize that.’ Our first stop was Green Lantern Village in Westminster, a city of 90,000, landlocked between Santa Ana and Huntington Beach. Rolfe is a tall, slouchy man with sad blue eyes and a mop of dark hair that has gone gray around the temples.