Twitter subpona police

Facebook Twitter
Battle over Twitter subpoena heats up Washington - Electronic privacy advocates on Thursday weighed in on a high-stakes legal fight over online communications, arguing that a subpoena seeking an Occupy Wall Street protester's tweets violates his rights to free speech and privacy. The filing from the American Civil Liberties Union, the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Public Citizen, Inc supports Twitter's position that the individual, Occupy protestor Malcolm Harris and not Twitter itself, is the owner of the tweets and thus the proper target for any subpoena. Manhattan Criminal Court Justice Matthew Sciarrino jnr had earlier ruled that Harris did not have the standing to challenge the subpoena, which seeks personal information and all of Harris' tweets from 15 September through 31 December 2011. Harris was one of 700 protesters arrested on the Brooklyn Bridge during a protest last October. Battle over Twitter subpoena heats up
By Robin Respaut Thu May 31, 2012 11:01pm EDT (Reuters) - Electronic privacy advocates on Thursday weighed in on a high-stakes legal fight over online communications, arguing that a subpoena seeking an Occupy Wall Street protester's tweets violates his rights to free speech and privacy. Legal battle over Twitter subpoena heats up Legal battle over Twitter subpoena heats up
UPDATE: Twitter would not comment on this particular matter, but gave us this statement: "To help users protect their rights, it is our policy to notify our users about law enforcement and governmental requests for their information, unless we are prevented by law from doing so." The leaked subpoena sent to Twitter this month by the Suffolk District Attorney's Office in Boston is causing some hoopla on the web and raising the issue of law enforcement's access to online personal data. On Dec. 14, the D.A.'s Office issued a subpoena to Twitter in order to access the account information of two users who tweeted a list of personal information they allegedly obtained by hacking into the Boston Police Patrolmen's Association. The hackers stole identifying information and Tweeted it to followers. The subpoena requests "available subscriber information, for the account or accounts associated with the following information, including IP address logs for account creation." Leaked Twitter Subpoena Raises Online Privacy Issues Leaked Twitter Subpoena Raises Online Privacy Issues