Subatomic particles don't care if time moves forward or backward — it's all the same to them. But now physicists have found proof of one theorized exception to this rule. Usually, time is symmetrical for particles, meaning events happen the same way if time progresses forward or backward. Direction of Time Fuzzy for Subatomic Particles | Time Asymmetry Direction of Time Fuzzy for Subatomic Particles | Time Asymmetry
Twisted Physics: 7 Mind-Blowing Findings | Spooky Entanglement, Antimatter & Nuclear Fusion Twisted Physics: 7 Mind-Blowing Findings | Spooky Entanglement, Antimatter & Nuclear Fusion by Clara Moskowitz, LiveScience Senior Writer | February 18, 2011 08:55am ET Credit: Mark Dennis. From bizarre antimatter to experiments that tie light up in knots, physics has revealed some spooky sides of our world. Here are seven of the most mind-blowing recent discoveries.
The Coolest Little Particles in Nature | Supersymmetry & Sparticles | God Particle, Higgs Boson | Atom Smashers
Dreamy Images Reveal Beauty in Physics | Fluid Dynamics A dreamy new exhibition of images showcases the art of physics, from the beauty of a bubble rising to the flow of water around coral. The images, part of the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics Gallery of Fluid Motion, are drawn from the most artistic and evocative research presented at the Fluid Dynamics annual meeting. The meeting was held from Nov. 18-20 in San Diego. Dreamy Images Reveal Beauty in Physics | Fluid Dynamics
Top 50 Physics Ideas: the principles that changed the world Top 50 Physics Ideas: the principles that changed the world The following list is based on an excellent science book known as the 50 Physics Ideas You Really Need to Know. It is about the top ideas that change this natural science forever and help us have a better understanding of nature and how the universe behaves. It covers the discoveries of the last two millennia from the mathematic laws of nature developed by the ancient Greeks way up to the infinite possibilities of Quantum Physics, passing be key elements of Scientific Revolution. The list as well as the book is dived into various sections including Matter In Motion, Beneath The Waves, Conundrums, Splitting Atoms and finally Space and Time. Hopefully, it will give you a good overview of Physics, one of academic oldest disciplines. Click here to get the Physics book now, best prices guaranteed.
Physics

By Eddie Wrenn PUBLISHED: 09:09 GMT, 22 June 2012 | UPDATED: 10:42 GMT, 22 June 2012 It's a childhood toy that we have probably all seen - but watch it in slow-motion, and the Slinky appears to defy the laws of physics. Watch the everyday Slinky 'defy' the laws of physics and gravity (but try not to go loopy) Watch the everyday Slinky 'defy' the laws of physics and gravity (but try not to go loopy)
Chemistry

Mathematics, Systems, Complexity & Chaos

Quantum Physics

Elements & Periodic Table

Nanoscience

String Theory

Dark Matter: The Cosmos' Greatest Mystery Deepens Dark Matter: The Cosmos' Greatest Mystery Deepens Like Hollywood legends Audrey Hepburn and Katharine Hepburn, dark energy and dark matter are completely unrelated, even though they share a name. Dark energy, a force that makes the universe expand faster and faster all the time, is called dark because it's mysterious. Nobody knows what it is.
Dark-Matter Theory Questioned by Astronomers' New Findings Dark-Matter Theory Questioned by Astronomers' New Findings The theory of dark matter took decades to take hold in astronomy, and no wonder. It's pretty tough to wrap your mind around the notion that some mysterious, invisible substance pervades the cosmos — and even tougher to accept that it outweighs ordinary matter by a factor of 6 to 1, at least. Evidence eventually trumped incredulity, though, and by the 1980s, the vast majority of scientists were on board with the idea, nutty though it might seem, and there they've remained ever since. But a new study out of the European Southern Observatory claims that this now established theory could be in trouble. Chilean astronomers took a look at the motion of 400-plus stars in the broadly defined neighborhood of the sun and concluded that the way they're all moving is inconsistent with conventional ideas about dark matter.
Note: this is the third of three parts of the essay. The first two parts were published yesterday and the day before (see links at the bottom of the page). The very first discovery in fundamental physics, made by Galileo, – the law of free fall – was also the first discovery in physics of gravity. It was the starting point for Newton’s law of universal gravitation a few decades later. Was it possible for Galileo himself to discover the law of universal gravitation at his level of mathematization and by his style of doing science? Yes it was, although Galileo’s predisposition was quite unfavorable, since he rejected statements on attraction as an explanation of the Solar system. How the Modern Physics was invented in the 17th century, part 3: Why Galileo didn’t discover universal gravitation? | Guest Blog How the Modern Physics was invented in the 17th century, part 3: Why Galileo didn’t discover universal gravitation? | Guest Blog
Nature can be extremely devious in the way it hides its secrets. Sometimes the most remarkable and profound insights are staring us right in the face every day in the most mundane phenomena. For instance, we have all seen the spectacular colors that can appear in soap bubbles: The secret molecular life of soap bubbles (1913) The secret molecular life of soap bubbles (1913)
LHC antimatter anomaly hints at new physics - physics-math - 23 November 2011 Read full article Continue reading page |1|2 The Large Hadron Collider has turned up differences in how particles of matter and antimatter decay that the reigning standard model of physics may not be able to explain LHC antimatter anomaly hints at new physics - physics-math - 23 November 2011
New Scientist TV: Animation reveals the world's hidden equations MacGregor Campbell, contributor Although they don't actually exist in the physical world, our most powerful tools could be mathematical equations. They underlie much of modern technology, from radio to power generation, to photo compression and electronic musical instruments. In our latest animated explainer, we look at how the wave equation, Maxwell's equations and the Fourier transform came to rule the modern world.
Quantum Computers Will Solve Problems that would take Today's Computers Longer than the Age of the Universe Astrophysicist Paul Davies at Arizona State University proposes that information, not mathematics, is the foundation on which physical reality, the laws of nature, are is constructed. Meanwhile at MIT, computer scientist Seth Lloyd, develops Davies assumption, by treating quantum events as "quantum bits," or qubits, as the way whereby the universe "registers itself." Lloyd proposes that information is a quantifiable physical value, as much as mass or motion -that any physical system--a river, you, the universe--is a quantum mechanical computer. Lloyd has calculated that "a computer made up of all the energy in the entire known universe (that is, within the visible “horizon” of forty-two billion light-years) can store about 1092 bits of information and can perform 10105 computations/second." The universe itself is a quantum computer, Lloyd says, and it has made a mind-boggling 10122/sec computations since the Big Bang (for that part of the universe within the “horizon”).
Physicists Predict Properties of Prime Numbers from Freezing Liquids Physicists from Queen Mary’s School of Mathematical Sciences, together with colleagues from Bristol University, discovered a pattern in frozen glasses that relates to prime numbers. By building models and developing theories, the team believes they have evidence for a connection between prime numbers and freezing in certain complex materials in Physics. The same freezing which is responsible for transforming liquids into glasses can help to predict some patterns observed in prime numbers, according to a team of scientists from Queen Mary, University of London and Bristol University.
The accidental universe: Science's crisis of faith—By Alan P. Lightman
Printer friendly version Share 18 April 2012 Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) An electron has been observed to decay into two separate parts, each carrying a particular property of the electron: a spinon carrying its spin - the property making the electron behave as a tiny compass needle - and an orbiton carrying its orbital moment - which arises from the electron's motion around the nucleus. Physicists observe the splitting of an electron inside a solid
Anonymous Donor Saves Last U.S. Particle Physics Lab From Going Under Fermilab, aglow in the night, is a symbol of national pride and a face of U.S. particle physics. However, this lab, like a last old lion, is on the verge of death due to drastic underfunding. (Source: Fred Ullrich/Fermilab ) Fermi earns a stay-of-execution thanks in part to a generous anonymous philanthropist Particle physics is one of the most intriguing scientific fields, probing the nature of the very makeup of the universe itself. However, over the last half decade, due to the growing economic crisis and various items such as war funding taking precedence in government budgets, the budget to help the U.S. stay leaders in the field of particle physics has been slipping.
Tiny 'Soccer Ball' Space Molecules Could Equal 10,000 Mount Everests | Buckyballs in Space & Space Molecules | Spitzer Space Telescope & Carbon BuckyBalls in Space | LiveScience
'Faster Than Light' Neutrino Was Product of Loose Cable at CERN
Scientists capture first image of two atoms INSIDE a molecule (but we'll just have to take their word for it)
Welcome to Explorations in Science with Dr. Michio Kaku