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Internet Privacy

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Internet privacy. Internet privacy involves the right or mandate of personal privacy concerning the storing, repurposing, provision to third-parties, and displaying of information pertaining to oneself via the Internet.

Internet privacy

Internet privacy is a subset of computer privacy. Privacy concerns have been articulated from the beginnings of large scale computer sharing.[1] Privacy can entail either Personally Identifying Information (PII) or non-PII information such as a site visitor's behavior on a website. PII refers to any information that can be used to identify an individual. For example, age and physical address alone could identify who an individual is without explicitly disclosing their name, as these two factors are unique enough to typically identify a specific person.

Levels of privacy[edit] People with only a casual concern for Internet privacy need not achieve total anonymity. There are also several governmental organizations that protect individual's privacy and anonymity on the Internet, to a point. Isafety. Guide to Practical Privacy Tools. A Pocket Guide to Social Media and Kids. Pete Blackshaw, Executive Vice President, Digital Strategic Services, The Nielsen Company SUMMARY: When is a phone not a phone?

A Pocket Guide to Social Media and Kids

In the hands of children and tweens, today’s cell phones are primarily used as text messaging devices, cameras, gaming consoles, video viewers, MP3 players, and incidentally, as mobile phones via the speaker capability so their friends can chime in on the call. Parents are getting dialed in to the social media phenomenon and beginning to understand—and limit—how children use new media.This article draws from a keynote speech delivered last month at the Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU) annual conference. Digital media is an enabling framework for brands, parents and educators—it’s on demand, interactive, sensing and connected.

And social media adds expression and sharing capabilities. Their influence is immediate, highly viral and authentic... In the marketing world, the buzz is all about consumer-generated media. Giving voice. A Parent’s Guide to Social Networking. Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize online; it's important to help your child learn how to navigate these spaces safely.

A Parent’s Guide to Social Networking

Among the pitfalls that come with online socializing are sharing too much information or posting comments, photos, or videos that can damage a reputation or hurt someone's feelings. Applying real-world judgment can help minimize those risks. Remind Kids that Online Actions Have Consequences The words kids write and the images they post have consequences offline. Some of your child's profile may be seen by a broader audience than you — or they — are comfortable with, even if privacy settings are high.

Even if you delete the information from a site, you have little control over older versions that may exist on other people's computers and may circulate online. Tell Kids to Limit What They Share Tell your kids why it's important to keep some things — about themselves, family members, and friends — to themselves. Chat with Kids. Online Privacy: Using the Internet Safely. Copyright © 1995 - 2014Privacy Rights Clearinghouse Introduction Introduction As consumers increasingly go online in so many aspects of their daily lives, the challenge is enjoy the conveniences of online activities while limiting the privacy sacrifices.

Online Privacy: Using the Internet Safely

As the focus of online activity migrates from desktop and laptop computers to smartphones and other mobile devices, the mechanisms for protecting your privacy continue to evolve. Most internet users would like to be anonymous online, but many think it is not possible to be completely anonymous online. This fact sheet explains how your online activities may compromise your privacy and the steps you can take to protect youself. 1: Which Online Activities Reveal My Personal Information? When you are online, you provide information to others at almost every step of the way. Signing up for Internet service If you use a computer to access the Internet and pay for the service yourself, you signed up with an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Broadband - OnGuard Online.

You can get high-speed internet access through a variety of services, including: digital subscriber line (DSL) cable fiber optic satellite wireless When you’re shopping for internet service, it helps to understand the differences and know what questions to ask.

Broadband - OnGuard Online

Types of High-Speed Internet Service The type of internet service available to you depends on what technology your local providers offer: Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL) transmit data through phone lines without interfering with telephone service. Cable modems provide access to the internet through cable lines without interfering with your cable TV service; cable companies provide this service. Fiber optic service provides internet, phone, and TV services delivered simultaneously through one fiber optic line. Satellite internet service is available in most areas from providers of satellite television services.

There also are wireless internet options available in some areas: Identity Theft - OnGuard Online. Privacy Paradox. Privacy and Social Networks. Google Opt Out Feature Lets Users Protect Privacy By Moving To R. Help Center. Privacy. Privacy Guide. Privacy Policy.