Economics

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Planet Money Podcast On today's show, we follow up on a few of the stories we did in 2013. Radio Decades ago, amid fears of rapid population growth, a biologist and an economist made a bet about how many people the planet could sustain.

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Paul Krugman Paul Krugman Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, Professor of Economics and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, Centenary Professor at the London School of Economics, and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times.[2][3] In 2008, Krugman won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography. According to the prize Committee, the prize was given for Krugman's work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic concentration of wealth, by examining the effects of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services. Krugman is known in academia for his work on international economics (including trade theory, economic geography, and international finance),[5][6] liquidity traps, and currency crises. Krugman is ranked among the most influential economic thinkers in the US.[7]
The other day someone — I don’t remember who or where — asked an interesting question: when did it become so common to disparage anyone who hasn’t made it big, hasn’t gotten rich, as a “loser”? Well, that’s actually a question we can answer, using Google Ngrams, which track the frequency with which words or phrases are used in books: Sure enough, the term “losers” has become much more common since the 1960s. Economics and Politics - Paul Krugman Blog

Economics and Politics - Paul Krugman Blog

Friedrich Hayek Friedrich Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek CH (German: [ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈaʊ̯ɡʊst ˈhaɪ̯ɛk]; 8 May 1899 – 23 March 1992), born in Austria-Hungary as Friedrich August von Hayek and frequently known as F. A. Hayek, was an Austrian, later British,[1] economist[2] and philosopher best known for his defense of classical liberalism. In 1974, Hayek shared the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (with Gunnar Myrdal) for his "pioneering work in the theory of money and economic fluctuations and ... penetrating analysis of the interdependence of economic, social and institutional phenomena".[3] Hayek was a major political thinker of the twentieth century,[4] and his account of how changing prices communicate information which enables individuals to coordinate their plans is widely regarded as an important achievement in economics.[5]
The famous economist once called the gold standard "a barbarous relic." (Tim Gidal/Picture Post/Getty Images) On today's Planet Money: Podcast: John Maynard Keynes Has A Plan : Planet Money Podcast: John Maynard Keynes Has A Plan : Planet Money