background preloader

Wikipedia

Facebook Twitter

Entheogen. A group of peyotes, in cultivation. Peyote has been used in ritual contexts for thousands of years.[1][2][3] With the advent of organic chemistry, there now exist many synthetic drugs with similar psychoactive properties, many derived from these plants. Many pure active compounds with psychoactive properties have been isolated from these organisms and chemically synthesized, including mescaline, psilocybin, DMT, salvinorin A, ibogaine, ergine, and muscimol, respectively.

Semi-synthetic (e.g. LSD used by the New American Church) and synthetic drugs (e.g. DPT used by the Temple of the True Inner Light and 2C-B used by the Sangoma) have also been developed.[6] Entheogens may be compounded through the work of a shaman or apothecary in a tea, admixture, or potion like ayahuasca or bhang.

Etymology[edit] The neologism entheogen was coined in 1979 by a group of ethnobotanists and scholars of mythology (Carl A. Entheogen was coined as a replacement for the terms hallucinogen and psychedelic. L. Uttar Pradesh Association of Dead People. The Uttar Pradesh Association of Dead People (Uttar Pradesh Mritak Sangh) is a northern Indian pressure group that seeks to reclaim the legal rights of those falsely listed by the Indian government as being dead. In the overcrowded regions of Uttar Pradesh, many have resorted to bribing officials to have the owner of a plot declared deceased and the land transferred to their ownership.

The process to undo this is long, arduous, as well as often hopelessly inefficient and corrupt — not to mention that those least able to fight back make excellent victims. The Association seeks to reverse the declarations, call attention to the problem and prevent others from being exploited in similar fashion. The founder and president is Lal Bihari, who was "dead" from 1976 to 1994 and used the word Mritak (Dead) in his name during the period. History[edit] Lal Bihari[edit] In 1976 15 year old Lal Bihari's application for loan in a bank in Azamgarh was denied. External links[edit] Abiogenesis. Scientific hypotheses about the origins of life can be divided into a number of categories. Many approaches investigate how self-replicating molecules or their components came into existence. On the assumption that life originated spontaneously on Earth, the Miller–Urey experiment and similar experiments demonstrated that most amino acids, often called "the building blocks of life", can be racemically synthesized in conditions which were intended to be similar to those of the early Earth.

Several mechanisms have been investigated, including lightning and radiation. Other approaches ("metabolism first" hypotheses) focus on understanding how catalysis in chemical systems in the early Earth might have provided the precursor molecules necessary for self-replication. Early conditions[edit] The Hadean Earth is thought to have had a secondary atmosphere, formed through degassing of the rocks that accumulated from planetesimal impactors.

The earliest life on Earth[edit] Current models[edit] Kaspar Hauser. Kaspar Hauser (30 April 1812 (?) – 17 December 1833) was a German youth who claimed to have grown up in the total isolation of a darkened cell. Hauser's claims, and his subsequent death by stabbing, sparked much debate and controversy. Theories propounded at the time linked him with the grand ducal House of Baden. These have long since been rejected by professional historians.[1] History[edit] First appearance[edit] There was another short letter enclosed purporting to be from his mother to his prior caretaker. A shoemaker named Weickmann took the boy to the house of Captain von Wessenig, where he would repeat only the words "I want to be a cavalryman, as my father was" and "Horse! He spent the following two months in Vestner Gate Tower (de) in the care of a jailer named Andreas Hiltel.

Statue of Kaspar, old city centre, Ansbach, Germany Hauser's story about his life in a dungeon[edit] He claimed that he found bread and water next to his bed each morning. Further life in Nuremberg[edit] Dr. Abiogenesis. Doctor Sleep (novel) I mentioned two potential projects while I was on the road, one a new Mid-World book (not directly about Roland Deschain, but yes, he and his friend Cuthbert are in it, hunting a skin-man, which are what werewolves are called in that lost kingdom) and a sequel to The Shining called Doctor Sleep. Are you interested in reading either of these? If so, which one turns your dials more? [We] will be counting your votes (and of course it all means nothing if the muse doesn't speak).[7] Voting ended on December 31, 2009, and it was revealed that Doctor Sleep received 5,861 votes, while The Wind Through the Keyhole received 5,812.[8] In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, King revealed that he had hired researcher Rocky Wood to work on the continuity between The Shining and Doctor Sleep.[12] On May 8, 2012, Stephen King's official website announced a tentative publication date of January 15, 2013 for Doctor Sleep.

Nisiyama Onsen Keiunkan. Nishiyama Onsen Keiunkan (西山温泉慶雲館, Nishiyama onsen keiunkan?) Is a hot spring hotel in Hayakawa, Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan. Founded in 705, it is the oldest hotel and oldest company still in operation according to the Guinness World Records.[1] The hotel has had 52 operators since its founding. [citation needed] See also[edit] List of oldest companies – for several hundred notably old companies. References[edit] External links[edit] Official website in Japanese Coordinates: Where Do You Find Quiet in New York? Ryokan (Japanese inn) A ryokan (旅館?) Is a type of traditional Japanese inn that originated in the Edo period (1603–1868), when such inns served travelers along Japan's highways.

They typically feature tatami-matted rooms, communal baths, and other public areas where visitors may wear yukata and talk with the owner.[1] Ryokan are difficult to find in Tokyo and other large cities because many are expensive compared to hotels, and Japanese people increasingly use hotels for urban tourism. Nonetheless, some major cities do have reasonably priced ryokan, with some costing as little as $40 a night. A typical ryokan has a relatively large entrance hall, with couches and chairs where guests can sit and talk; a modernized ryokan often has a television in the hall as well. A traditional breakfast at a Kyoto ryokan Most ryokan offer dinner and breakfast, which are often included in the price of the room. Some ryokan have a communal dining area, but most serve meals in the guests' rooms. Minshuku (民宿?) Minnie Riperton.