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EDIBLE LANDSCAPING

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Feed yourself for free: the 12 'Survival Plants' Part 1. Out of the many hundred edible British foods detailed in the best 'wild plant' guides, just these 12 will provide all you truly need, and more, for a continual fresh food supply.

Feed yourself for free: the 12 'Survival Plants' Part 1

The advantage these 12 have over their 400 edible wild cousins is abundance, resilience, versatility and ease of recognition. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) Compared with an equal weight of lettuce, dandelion has three times the vitamin C, four times the protein, carbohydrate, fat, calcium, iron and vitamin B, five times the phosphorous - and an astounding 12 times the vitamin A. Perennialsolutions. February 12, 2013 User Admin Eric Toensmeier This post is to celebrate the release of my new Perennial Vegetable Gardening DVD!

perennialsolutions

Cardone/Cardoon from Ocean Mist Farms. How to Prepare Cardoons. At the Alemany Farmer's Market right now we're seeing a lot of cardoons in season.

How to Prepare Cardoons

Cardoons are closely related to - and taste very much like - artichokes. Why is this vegetable not well-known, then? Plant Recommendations Zones 6-8 » Edible Landscaping with Rosalind Creasy. USDA Zones 6 through 8 cover areas of the country where the winter low temperatures seldom go below – 10 degrees F.

Plant Recommendations Zones 6-8 » Edible Landscaping with Rosalind Creasy

The following are examples of edibles for your landscape in Zones 6 to 8: Annual Vegetables and Edible Flowers - cool season/ can withstand light frosts – all greens including: rainbow chards, mustards; cabbages, lettuces, kales etc.; flower bud vegetables: broccoli and cauliflower; root vegetables: carrots, beets, radishes, etc; plus peas, nasturtiums, calendulas, pansies, and winter wheat. Warm season/ no frost tolerance – beans, cucumbers, eggplants, melons, okra, peanuts, peppers, sweet potatoes, squash, slicing and cherry tomatoes. Perennials. Make an edible garden border. Garden Edging Ideas. 10 design ideas for a tiny edible garden. 7 edible garden design ideas. How to Plant Vegetables.

North Carolina Cooperative Extension. — Written By NC Cooperative Extension As a result of the economic downswing, backyard fruit and vegetable gardening is increasing in popularity.

North Carolina Cooperative Extension

Many people who have never raised fruits or vegetables are now planting seed and buying transplants, hopeful to reap the rewards of their time and labor. Traditionally, produce gardens were located away from the house because they were unsightly. Now, when many Americans are pressed for time, locating produce near high traffic areas can make gardening more convenient and accessible. Although not a new concept, edible landscaping, or incorporating food-producing plants into the landscape, is making a comeback. North Carolina Cooperative Extension. — Written By NC Cooperative Extension We have heard that the 7th billion person has been born and I wonder, how are we going to feed 7 billion people?

North Carolina Cooperative Extension

The term “edible landscape” will become quite familiar to many North Carolinians in future years. An edible landscape challenges the home gardener to incorporate fruit- and vegetable-producing plants into the overall design. An Edible Landscape - Home + Garden - April 2013. Eat Your Yard!

An Edible Landscape - Home + Garden - April 2013

Author and gardening expert Nan K. Chase offers dos and don’ts for creating a beautiful—and bountiful—Charlotte landscape. An Edible Landscape - Home + Garden - April 2013. Edible Landscaping Plant Sale: Buy plants online from our garden center and plant nursery. Edible Landscaping Plant Sale: Buy plants online from our garden center and plant nursery. Vegetables and Flowers Mix in Beautiful Edible Gardens. Vegetables and Flowers Mix in Beautiful Edible Gardens. An Edible Cottage Garden With a Pleasing Symmetry. Eating from the Ground Up (National Gardening Association) Alpine strawberries feature tasty small berries on diminutive plants that flower and fruit all summer long.

Eating from the Ground Up (National Gardening Association)

Cranberries don't need bogs to grow. Plant yours where ever blueberries thrive and enjoy making your own cranberry sauce around the holidays. In this newsletter I often talk about edible plants replacing ornamental trees, shrubs and flowers in your landscape. However, a less obvious area where you can also incorporate edibles is in your ground covers.