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Our DIY Co-Sleeping Crib. Bedsharing and SIDS: The Whole Truth. I recently posted an article on the do’s and don’ts of co-sleeping, an article I hoped would be helpful for those who want to co-sleep or bedshare with their baby.

Bedsharing and SIDS: The Whole Truth

I imagined the article would simply be a quick guide on some of the safety concerns that mothers need to be aware of that aren’t always obvious, and for some, the article seems to have done its job. However, it also had the effect of raising the ire of those who believe bedsharing can never be safe, drawing me into a debate I realize is more passionate than I had ever anticipated. Let it be known that I bedshare and have since my daughter was first born. I intend to continue until she chooses to leave the bed. I also did my research prior to bedsharing as I admit I was hesitant. This is not a unique experience and many women have said they feel the same overwhelming urge to sleep with their child and protect them.

There’s a third red flag though, and one that is particularly salient. [Photo/Image credit: Gioia Albano] [2] [12] My Conversation With Co-Sleeping Expert James McKenna. Dr.

My Conversation With Co-Sleeping Expert James McKenna

James J. McKenna is a professor of anthropology and the director of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. He is a world-renowned expert on infant sleep — particularly the practice of bed sharing in relation to breastfeeding. Co-sleeping Safer Than Cribs Says SIDS Researcher James McKenna.

Image © Flickr user tamakisono Co-sleeping may be a controversial topic among the general population, but according to a recent Inhabitots co-sleeping poll, the vast majority of our readers feel that co-sleeping is safe and healthy.

Co-sleeping Safer Than Cribs Says SIDS Researcher James McKenna

Dr. James McKenna, a well-known Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) researcher agrees that co-sleeping is safer than crib sleeping. McKenna has spent 30 years researching babies and sleep, along with correlated issues, such as breastfeeding and SIDS. McKenna notes that co-sleeping (the act of sleeping in the same room as a child) and bed-sharing (the act of sharing a bed with a child) do hold some major benefits for both mother and child, including a possible reduced risk of SIDS. Image © Flickr user Spigoo. List of Publications // Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory // University of Notre Dame.

There is no such thing as infant sleep, there is no such thing as breasfeeding, there breastsleeping.

List of Publications // Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory // University of Notre Dame

Acta Pediatrica doi: 10.1111/apa.13161 Early version online. (refereed) Breastsleeping, Cosleeping and Breastfeeding. JJ McKenna. In : Overview Vol 20; 3: 1-5 A Women’s Health Bulletin from Olson Center For Women’s Health, University of Nebraska Medical School. The First President Of SIDS Foundation Says Bed Sharing Isn’t Dangerous. All parents want to be sure the sleep choices they make will keep their baby safe.

The First President Of SIDS Foundation Says Bed Sharing Isn’t Dangerous

While SIDS is rare, it’s still a common fear of many parents, and understandably so. Not only is SIDS prevention a huge parental worry, it’s something many dedicated health professionals seek to prevent. Through research and community education, health professionals hope to reduce SIDS as much as possible, by helping parents make good decisions. One common decision many assume, and are even told, can reduce risk is to avoid bed-sharing with baby. Co-sleeping: Finding the confidence to say this is my choice and I’m happy with it.

I share a bed with my baby and I have the injuries to prove it.

Co-sleeping: Finding the confidence to say this is my choice and I’m happy with it

A dead arm from the weight of his golden, curly head. An aching side from lying in a protective C-shape around him all night. And the constant, flinty little chips in my maternal confidence from all the people who suck in their cheeks and tell me that I’m doing parenting wrong. My Conversation With Co-Sleeping Expert James McKenna. Bedsharing. Pediatric Politics: How Dire Warnings Against Infant Bed Sharing ‘Backfired’ Sundaykofax/flickr By Dr.

Pediatric Politics: How Dire Warnings Against Infant Bed Sharing ‘Backfired’

Melissa Bartick Guest Contributor. Co-Sleeping: Yes, No, Sometimes? Our first three babies were easy sleepers.

Co-Sleeping: Yes, No, Sometimes?

We felt no need or desire to have them share our bed. Besides, I was a new member of the medical profession whose party line was that sleeping with babies was weird and even dangerous. Then along came our fourth child, Hayden, born in 1978, whose birth changed our lives and our attitudes about sleep. Co-Sleeping: Yes Were it not for Hayden, many of our books might never have been written. Soon after we ventured into this “daring” sleeping arrangement, I consulted baby books for advice. Sleeping with Hayden opened our hearts and minds to the fact that there are many nighttime parenting styles, and parents need to be sensible and use whatever arrangement gets all family members the best night’s sleep. Not an unusual custom At first we thought we were doing something unusual, but we soon discovered that many other parents slept with their babies, too. Co-sleeping – if you do it properly it IS safe - Muddling Along BlogMuddling Along Blog.

If you read the press, talk to your Health Visitor, talk to your parents, the chances are that everyone has told you that co-sleeping/bed sharing/sleep sharing/family bed is Not Safe and You Must Not Sleep With Your Baby.

Co-sleeping – if you do it properly it IS safe - Muddling Along BlogMuddling Along Blog

If you talk to parents in the real world, living real lives you’ll generally find that they have co-slept at some point or wish they could but don’t know how. If they have co-slept, generally they will tell you that it got them through and it meant they got more sleep. Most will have only given it a go through desperation after a multitude of broken nights. But if you are going to co-sleep, you do have to do it properly. Not after drinkingNot after drugsNot after pills that might make you super drowsyNot if you’re so exhausted you’ll sleep through anything (if this is the case give the baby to your partner for 3 hours and get a decent rest and then give it a whirl You’ll need to do a quick check of your bed Don’t use a water bed (does anyone anymore?)

NorthumbriaGuidancetosupportsafessleepingpractices.pdf. API_Infant_Sleep_Safety_Brochure.pdf. The Safe Sleep Seven - Breastfeeding Today. The remainder of Chapter 2 explores the details of each Safe Sleep Seven criteria, including the research and common sense behind them.

The Safe Sleep Seven - Breastfeeding Today

Something to Sleep On Research on infant sleep risks, which we go over in depth in Chapter 19, shows again and again that the big risks of shared sleep are a mix of SIDS risks that affect vulnerable babies and breathing hazards that affect all babies: smoking, alcohol or drugs, risky surfaces like sofas, baby on his front (unless he’s on an adult’s chest), and formula-feeding. Combine two or more of those, and the risk can skyrocket. If you and your baby meet the requirements in the Safe Sleep Seven checklist, you’ve already eliminated all the biggest SIDS risks. And if you prepare your bed, then your baby’s overall nighttime risk becomes vanishingly small.

References 1 Ball, H. 2 U.S. 3 Imong, S. 4 Howel, D., Ball, H. 5 Moon, R. 6 Kendall-Tackett, K., Cong, Z., Hale, T.