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s Guide to Network Programming s Guide to Network Programming Using Internet Sockets Brian "Beej Jorgensen" Hall beej@beej.us Version 3.0.15 July 3, 2012 Copyright © 2012 Brian "Beej Jorgensen" Hall Contents
s Guide to Network Programming s Guide to Network Programming Using Internet Sockets Brian "Beej Jorgensen" Hall beej@beej.us Version 3.0.15 July 3, 2012
Handle multiple socket connections with fd_set and select on Linux | Binary Tides Handle multiple socket connections with fd_set and select on Linux | Binary Tides #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> //strlen #include <stdlib.h> #include <errno.h>
So just why am I so hyped on select()? One traditional way to write network servers is to have the main server block on accept(), waiting for a connection. Once a connection comes in, the server fork()s, the child process handles the connection and the main server is able to service new incoming requests. The World of select() The World of select()
Programs that use non-blocking I/O tend to follow the rule that every function has to return immediately, i.e. all the functions in such programs are nonblocking. Thus control passes very quickly from one routine to the next. You have to understand the overall picture to some extent before any one piece makes sense. (This makes it harder to get your mind around than the same program written with blocking calls, but the benefits mentioned elsewhere in this document make up for this trouble, so don't be discouraged.) Introduction to non-blocking I/O Introduction to non-blocking I/O
IEEE 802.11 IEEE 802.11 is a set of media access control (MAC) and physical layer (PHY) specifications for implementing wireless local area network (WLAN) computer communication in the 2.4, 3.6, 5 and 60 GHz frequency bands. They are created and maintained by the IEEE LAN/MAN Standards Committee (IEEE 802). The base version of the standard was released in 1997 and has had subsequent amendments. The standard and amendments provide the basis for wireless network products using the Wi-Fi brand. While each amendment is officially revoked when it is incorporated in the latest version of the standard, the corporate world tends to market to the revisions because they concisely denote capabilities of their products. As a result, in the market place, each revision tends to become its own standard. IEEE 802.11
DHCP DHCP является расширением протокола BOOTP, использовавшегося ранее для обеспечения бездисковых рабочих станций IP-адресами при их загрузке. DHCP сохраняет обратную совместимость с BOOTP. История[править | править исходный текст] Стандарт протокола DHCP был принят в октябре 1993 года. Действующая версия протокола (март 1997 года) описана в RFC 2131. Новая версия DHCP, предназначенная для использования в среде IPv6, носит название DHCPv6 и определена в RFC 3315 (июль 2003 года). DHCP
Time to live Time to live IP packets[edit] DNS records[edit] TTLs also occur in the Domain Name System (DNS), where they are set by an authoritative name server for a particular resource record. When a caching (recursive) nameserver queries the authoritative nameserver for a resource record, it will cache that record for the time (in seconds) specified by the TTL. If a stub resolver queries the caching nameserver for the same record before the TTL has expired, the caching server will simply reply with the already cached resource record rather than retrieve it from the authoritative nameserver again. Nameservers may also have a TTL set for NXDOMAIN (acknowledgment that a domain does not exist); but they are generally short in duration (three hours at most).
Network interface controller A network interface controller (NIC, also known as a network interface card, network adapter, LAN adapter, and by similar terms) is a computer hardware component that connects a computer to a computer network.[1] Early network interface controllers were commonly implemented on expansion cards that plugged into a computer bus; the low cost and ubiquity of the Ethernet standard means that most newer computers have a network interface built into the motherboard. Purpose[edit] The network controller implements the electronic circuitry required to communicate using a specific physical layer and data link layer standard such as Ethernet, Wi-Fi or Token Ring. Network interface controller
NAT NAT Функционирование[править | править исходный текст] Принимая пакет от локального компьютера, роутер смотрит на IP-адрес назначения. Если это локальный адрес, то пакет пересылается другому локальному компьютеру. Если нет, то пакет надо переслать наружу в интернет. Но ведь обратным адресом в пакете указан локальный адрес компьютера, который из интернета будет недоступен.
NAT
IPv6 IPv6 (англ. Internet Protocol version 6) — новая версия протокола IP, призванная решить проблемы, с которыми столкнулась предыдущая версия (IPv4) при её использовании в интернете, за счёт использования длины адреса 128 бит вместо 32. Протокол был разработан IETF.
IPv4 Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) is the fourth version in the development of the Internet Protocol (IP) Internet, and routes most traffic on the Internet.[1] However, a successor protocol, IPv6, has been defined and is in various stages of production deployment. IPv4 is described in IETF publication RFC 791 (September 1981), replacing an earlier definition (RFC 760, January 1980). IPv4 is a connectionless protocol for use on packet-switched networks. It operates on a best effort delivery model, in that it does not guarantee delivery, nor does it assure proper sequencing or avoidance of duplicate delivery. These aspects, including data integrity, are addressed by an upper layer transport protocol, such as the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP).
Port (computer networking) In computer networking, a port is an application-specific or process-specific software construct serving as a communications endpoint in a computer's host operating system. A port is associated with an IP address of the host, as well as the type of protocol used for communication. The purpose of ports is to uniquely identify different applications or processes running on a single computer and thereby enable them to share a single physical connection to a packet-switched network like the Internet.