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Armenian desserts

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Armenian desert on Pinterest | Armenian Food, Lebanese Recipes and Arabic Sweets. Citrus Cranberry Nazook Recipe. Armenian Nutmeg Cake Recipe. Cancel TOP Filters What's in Your Fridge? Browse By: Next Recipe Stumped for dinner? Get our life-saving Dinner Daily newsletter. You (and your stomach) can thank us later! Recipe Box Grocery List Print Share How to Make Meringue (2:30) More Get the essentials for perfect meringue to use in pies, cookies and more. More Videos Total Time 1hr 15mins Prep 15 mins Cook 1 hr Armenia is famous for its sweet and spicy nutmeg cake. Skip to Next Recipe Ingredients Nutrition 2 cups brown sugar, firmly packed (I use dark brown) 2 cups plain flour, sifted 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 pinch salt 1⁄2 cup cold butter, roughly chopped 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup milk (or you can substitute sour cream) 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1⁄2 cup walnuts or 1⁄2 cup pecans, chopped ground cinnamon (optional) Check Out Our Top Dessert Recipe Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Up Next How to Make Meringue Reviews See All Reviews Write A Review Most Helpful Armenian Nutmeg Cake Submit a Correction. Armenian cuisine. Armenian cuisine includes the foods and cooking techniques of the Armenian people, the Armenian Diaspora and traditional Armenian foods and dishes. The cuisine reflects the history and geography where Armenians have lived as well as incorporating outside influences. The cuisine also reflects the traditional crops and animals grown and raised in areas populated by Armenians. Overview[edit] Armenian cuisine belongs to the family of Caucasian cuisines, and has strong ties with Turkish cuisine, Georgian cuisine, Persian cuisine, and Levantine cuisine.

Historically, there have been mutual influences with all of the above-listed cuisines, though the exact nature of the influences is nebulous due to the dearth of research, political and nationalistic tensions, and the close co-habitation of the Armenian, Turkish, and Iranian people during the past seven centuries. Nevertheless, certain qualities may generally be taken to characterize Armenian cuisine: Typical dishes[edit] Spices and herbs[edit] -- TheArmenianKitchen.com -- Everything about Armenian food. Security Check Required. Armenian Halva: Quick, easy, tasty - Mama Makes It Better. NAZIK ARMENAKYANArmeniaNow The aroma of roast flour announces that halva (a paste of mainly nuts, sugar and oil) will be ready in a few minutes.

“There are many desserts and sweets, but home-made halva is the best. When I prepare halva I remember my childhood and the smell of it prepared by our grandmothers,” says Anahit Harutyunyan, talking about the traditional Armenian dessert. Halva used to be made in Armenian families during Tiarn’ndaraj, Easter and other holidays. The white color of flour gradually darkens and she mixes it using a wooden spoon – preferable she says. “When the flour changes its color and reddens, we add half a cup of oil and keep on mixing. At the same time we add half a cup of sugar,” Anahit says, mixing the mass in the frying-pan. She says that it is necessary to mix till it becomes well blended and sticky. “When you feel that it does not stick well, you may add a tablespoon of water. The plates where halva will be put are resting on the kitchen table. ½ cup oil. Almayass in the Flatiron: Armenian-Lebanese Food That's Best In Small Servings. [Photographs: J.

Kenji Lopez-Alt] Almayass 24 East 21st Street (at Broadway; map); 212-473-3100; almayassnyc.comService: Strangely inconsistent. Formal in procedure, but very informal in execution.Setting: Gorgeously decorated, semi formal.Must-Haves: Mouhamarra, moutabbal, lentil soup, beef tongue, ferri.Cost: Small plates $7 to $17, mains $22 to $30 Grade: B+ It's always a gamble trying to adapt a successful overseas concept to the fickle U.S. market. Occasionally you might strike gold—think: Till Death Do Us Part's metamorphosis into All In The Family. Having spent a few meals out at Almayass, the successful Middle Eastern chain of Armenian restaurants that has most recently expanded to Manhattan's Flatiron neighborhood, it feels more like the American version of The Office: a refreshingly unique and strong beginning that gets progressively less exciting.

On one visit, I wanted to dine alone in the dining room and order off the regular menu. Mouhamarra Lentli Soup Sweet and sour kebab. 19 Middle Eastern Desserts to Remember this Ramadan. 19 Middle Eastern Desserts to Remember this Ramadan With Ramadan gracing us with its presence, one cannot deny the very culinary experiences that remind us of a part of this holy month. Ramadan, a month of worship and giving, is also a month full of flavour and wondrous gastronomic experiences. From sweet honey syrups and pistachio flavoured ice creams, to crust-less pumpkin pies, Ramadan truly knows how to excite our taste buds.

Here’s a sample of Ramadan’s most delectable sweets. 1. Umm Ali Umm Ali, Egyptian sweet pastry pudding. Umm Ali, literally the mother of Ali, is perhaps one of Egypt’s most favored desserts. A purely Egyptian dessert, it is said that Umm Ali came about after the wife of Ezz El-Din Aybek, the ruler of Egypt at the time, Shagaret El Dorr ordered for her rival Umm Ali to be killed upon the death of her husband. This Egyptian dessert staple is made of phyllo pastry, milk, double cream, nuts and is sometimes topped with raisins, powdered sugar and coconut flakes. 2. 3.