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Ted Kaczynski

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027_Unabomber_p001-028.pdf (Objet application/pdf) Theodore J. Kaczynski News. The Best Thing I Learned At SXSW Was From the Unabomber By JENNA WORTHAM The best thing I learned at this year’s South by Southwest came from the unlikeliest of sources — a techno-skeptic and professor of philosophy who says he believes that technology is ruining modern society.

Theodore J. Kaczynski News

March 22, 2013, Friday Unabomber Misses College Reunion, but Sends an Update By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ As The Boston Globe reports, Theodore J. May 23, 2012, Wednesday Global Warming Ad Quickly Dropped By RACHEL NUWER The Heartland Institute ended a billboard campaign that compared those who believe in climate science to what it called “the world’s most notorious killers.” May 6, 2012, Sunday The ‘Murderabilia’ Market By THOMAS VINCIGUERRA There’s a growing demand for the possessions of convicted killers. June 05, 2011, Sunday In Tucson, Solace From Relatives of Past Killers By JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN; Marc Lacey and Carli Brosseau contributed reporting The parents of Jared L. January 22, 2011, Saturday The Terrorist Next Door By MICHAEL A. Jan. 22, 1998: Unabomber Pleads Guilty Video. April 3, 1996: Unabomber Suspect Ted Kaczynski Video. Industrial Society and Its Future. Freedom Club [the Unabomber, Theodore Kaczinski] 1.

Industrial Society and Its Future

The Industrial Revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race. They have greatly increased the life-expectancy of those of us who live in "advanced" countries, but they have destabilized society, have made life unfulfilling, have subjected human beings to indignities, have led to widespread psychological suffering (in the Third World to physical suffering as well) and have inflicted severe damage on the natural world. The continued development of technology will worsen the situation. It will certainly subject human beings to greater indignities and inflict greater damage on the natural world, it will probably lead to greater social disruption and psychological suffering, and it may lead to increased physical suffering even in "advanced" countries. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Comment on the Unabomber's Manifesto. © 2005 Paul Cooijmans FBI sketch of the Unabomber Introduction The Unabomber, real name Theodore (Ted) Kaczinski, committed sixteen bomb attacks from 1978 to 1995, killing three and injuring twenty-three persons.

Comment on the Unabomber's Manifesto

The attacks were aimed at universities ("Un") and airlines ("a"), hence the name Unabomber. In 1995 his manifesto was published, on his request, by several newspapers and on the Internet. The importance of studying the Unabomber's manifesto lies in trying to understand how an apparently highly intelligent individual gets to using violence against innocent. The full text of "Industrial Society and Its Future" Before his trial in 1998, the Unabomber was subjected to psychological examination.

The psychiatric report On the manifesto's conclusion The Unabomber's central and fatal conclusion can be summed up as: Technological society is incompatible with individual freedom and must therefore be destroyed and replaced by primitive society so that people will be free again. Paragraph 87: Ted Kaczynski. Theodore John "Ted" Kaczynski (/kəˈzɪnski/ ka-ZIN-skee, or ka-CHIN-skee; Polish: Kaczyński, pronounced [kaˈt͡ʂɨȷ̃skʲi]; born May 22, 1942), also known as the "Unabomber," is an American mathematician and serial murderer.

Ted Kaczynski

He is known for his wide-ranging social critiques, which opposed industrialism and modern technology.[2][3] [4][5] Between 1978 and 1995, Kaczynski engaged in a nationwide bombing campaign against people involved with modern technology, planting or mailing numerous home-made bombs, ultimately killing a total of three people and injuring 23 others. Kaczynski was born and raised in Evergreen Park, Illinois. While growing up in Evergreen Park he was a child prodigy, excelling academically from an early age. Kaczynski was accepted into Harvard University at the age of 16, where he earned an undergraduate degree.

He subsequently earned a PhD in mathematics from the University of Michigan. Early life[edit] He attended high school at Evergreen Park Community High School.