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The Intention Economy: The Internet As The World Wide City. » Sovereign-source vs. administrative identity ProjectVRM. You know who you are. So does the IRS, the DMV, and every Website you’ve ever made up a login and a password for — so it could “know” you. But none of those entities really knows you. What they know is what the techies call a namespace. What they have isn’t your identity, but an identifier. What they call your identity is an administrative construction. It’s something that had to be made up so that bureaucracies and technical systems could do what they do. Who you are isn’t just how you appear in the namespaces of administrative entities.

While the names that matter most to you are the ones you were given at birth, and the ones you choose to be called by, neither is fixed. Walt Whitman, the great author of Song of Myself, did not call himself Walter. Yes, some names come about socially, but the choice to use them for ourselves is personal. The nickname Doc came along after I started a company with two other guys, one of whom was named David. MoxyTongue puts it this way:

Turning Consumers into Customers - Doc Searls. By Doc Searls | 9:46 AM April 12, 2012 The expression “supply and demand” was first coined as “demand and supply,” by James Denham-Steuart in An Inquiry into the Principles of Political Oeconomy, written in 1767. In his Inquiry, Denham-Steuart says of demand, “it must constantly appear reciprocal. If I demand a pair of shoes, the shoemaker either demands money, or something else for his own use,” adding, “The nature of demand is to encourage industry.” Nine years later, in The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith wrote, “The real and effectual discipline which is exercised over a workman is that of his customers. It is the fear of losing their employment which restrains his frauds and corrects his negligence.” It helps to revisit these elementary lessons because we’ve been ignoring them on the Web — at the cost of billions of dollars in lost opportunities for businesses other than those driven by advertising and “big data” farming.

This causes two problems. VRM developments include: The Thinking Behind CareZone | What I Couldn't Say… I’m launching a new business today – it’s called CareZone. I’ve spent roughly 25 years listening and responding to the technology needs of large institutions. It’s a great business. But having seen the benefits technology delivered to enterprises, I’ve always found the most interesting innovations clustered around how those institutions responded to individuals. Technology has given voice to billions of people, and turned the market on its head: institutions accustomed to telling customers and citizens the rules of the road are now faced with individuals who can and do make their own decisions. Joined via social networks, or just acting in unison, individuals are now, and will forever be, the most powerful force on earth.

And after leaving Sun Microsystems in early 2010, I decided that was where I wanted to focus – on serving individuals, and creating products that would simplify and enhance their lives. But I also believe you can only succeed where you’ve got domain knowledge. AllThingsD. Europe Moves to Protect Online Privacy. Mr. Schrems was intrigued and somewhat rattled. He wasn’t worried about anything in particular.

Rather, he felt a vague disquiet about what Facebook could do with all that information about him in the future. Why was it there at all, he wondered, when he had deleted it? “It’s like a camera hanging over your bed while you’re having sex. It just doesn’t feel good,” is how he finally put it. “We in Europe are oftentimes frightened of what might happen some day.” Mr. Personal data is the oil that greases the Internet. But there is a price: that data about our lives and wants are collected, scrutinized and retained, often for a long time, by a great many technology companies.

The European media seized on Mr. “Europe has come to the conclusion that none of the companies can be trusted,” said Simon Davies, the director of the London-based nonprofit Privacy International. Every European country has a privacy law, as do Canada, Australia and many Latin American countries. » Toward a new symbiosis between Demand and Supply ProjectVRM. I’m listening and watching with fascination to Keith Scovell ‘s Shopper Power videos . In these Keith describes progress being made in a VRM direction by retailers and their upstream suppliers, detailing efforts made by Starbucks , Hallmark, CVS, Tesco/Homeplus, Frito-Lay , Reese’s and other companies — all recognizing that customers’ range of control over interactions in retail environments is increasing dramatically, and will increase a great deal more.

I haven’t watched all of Keith’s videos yet, but I’m taking notes as I do, and I recommend that others do the same, if they’re interested in how increasingly empowered and independent customers relate to vendors — especially at the retail level in the brick & mortar world. And how clueful vendors are working on better ways of interacting with those customers. It’s interesting that Keith is coming from the CPG — Consumer Packaged Goods — industry, and not CRM, which is most commonly posed as the counterpart to VRM. Shopper Power Video Version 2.0 Scovell. TEDxAlsace - Daniel Kaplan - "Donner ses données au client : le nouveau paradigme du commerce" - #VRM #QuantifiedSelf.

(25) Shared Personal Data: Revolutionizing Customer Relationship. Europe Weighs a Tough Law on Online Privacy and User Data. Tomasz Gzell/European Pressphoto Agency “Companies must be transparent about what they are doing,” said Viviane Reding, the European Commission's vice president for justice. Michael Löwa for The New York Times Malte Spitz, a German advocate for strict data protection. The proposed data protection regulation from the , a copy of which was obtained by The New York Times, could have significant consequences for all Internet companies that trade in personal data, whether it is pictures that people post on social networks or what they buy on retail sites or look for on a search engine.

The regulation would compel Web sites to tell consumers why their data is being collected and retain it for only as long as necessary. If data is stolen, sites would have to notify regulators within 24 hours. It also offers consumers the right to transport their data from one service to another — to deactivate a Facebook account, for example, and take one’s trove of pictures and posts and contacts to Google Plus. The Only Lasting Competitive Advantage Is Extreme Trust. This past Christmas season Amazon stole business from brick-and-mortar retailers with its free Price Check app for iPhone and Android. With Price Check, your phone could scan the barcode on any product in any retail store, or simply take a picture of it, and then compare its price with Amazon’s. And, pouring salt on wounds already being nursed by retailers everywhere, Amazon also announced that if you were in a store, used Price Check, and then bought the item from Amazon, you’d get an extra discount--mobile magic for the coupon-clipping set.

Price Check is Amazon’s contribution to instant, frictionless price transparency, and it represents just one of the many skirmishes in what promises to be a decades-long transformation of our entire commercial system. Technologies and services like Price Check are now steadily tearing away the protections that sellers used to be able to hide behind in their efforts to make a profit by selling commodity products at non-commodity prices. 1. 2. 3. 4.

It's Not Your Relationship to Manage. “We are not seats or eyeballs or end users or consumers. We are human beings—and our reach exceeds our grasp. Deal with it.” —Preamble to The Cluetrain Manifesto It’s been more than a decade since The Cluetrain Manifesto—by Rick Levine, Christopher Locke, Doc Searls, and David Weinberger—rocked the Web and climbed the best-seller list, and its effects continue to percolate across our culture and commerce. (See “Manifestos Are Conversations” for an oral history of its creation.) Searls, who now heads ProjectVRM as a Harvard University fellow with the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, says he expected the second act. CRM, in Searls’ description, still positions the customer relationship as an element within the seller’s system—a circumstance that ignores every other vendor the customer has relationships with.

A particular ProjectVRM fixation? Customer/Vendor Inequality “It seems everybody is looking at more ways to sell things, and not many good ways to buy things,” Searls says. VRM obs. Index of /CONFIANCE. Mission Impossible: Reaching Customer Service | Now Possible. Your mission, Jim, should you choose to accept it. Jim, you know the drill. Press the button above, and listen to your message, then read the top secret information below. Our operatives have been unable to get the information they require from eight major companies: DirecTV, Dish Network, Verizon, Comcast, AT&T Wireless, Bank of America, Sprint Network, Sprint Nextel, T-Mobile, and United Airlines. We have tried all the normal processes: emailing from their web sites, calling customer services, even writing letters.

Time and again, we have received incorrect or unhelpful information. Your mission, Jim, should you choose to accept it, is to create an insider network of experts at each firm. These experts must be willing to receive inquiries from our operatives and to supply the information they request in a matter of minutes. While we cannot offer these insiders jewels, gold coins or an island nation of their own, each operative will be authorized to pay a reward for good information. FAQ - tru.ly. We use our verification partners to authenticate your identity. This is done by matching your submitted information with that in a national database of government and public data. In order to become verified, specific pieces of information must match.

We also use proprietary technology to flag users who may be trying to conduct fraud. Yes, your security is our first priority. Our databases are encrypted with the latest technology, and all information is sent through a high level Secure Socket Layer (SSL). No, we will never share or sell your information. If we cannot verify you initially through the data you submitted on tru.ly, we offer the ability to get verified through a secondary process.

No, we only verify the information you provide us with, and we do not check your credit status. If you notice inappropriate actions by a user or your identity has been stolen, please report it immediately. MyData : redonner du pouvoir au consommateur - Blogs InternetActu.net. En 2010, dans l’ouvrage Informatique, Libertés, Identités, nous posions la question : “Que pourrais-je accomplir, moi, si je disposais, sous une forme réellement exploitable, des informations sur mes trajets et mes communications des années passées ? Pas seulement pour contrôler ce que d’autres en font, mais pour les utiliser à mes propres fins ?” Début 2011,en présentant les résultats de l’expédition de la Fing sur la Confiance numérique, nous allions plus loin : “A terme, la règle doit être simple : si vous savez quelque chose sur moi, je dois posséder la même information et pouvoir l’exploiter.”

Le 13 avril 2011, le gouvernement britannique a transformé ce qui n’était encore qu’une perspective hétérodoxe, fragilement appuyée sur un projet de recherche américain et une petite communauté d’innovateurs, en un programme d’ampleur nationale : MyData. “Consumer Empowerment” : redonner du pouvoir au consommateur VRM_QS_personalinformatics-300x280 MyData et après : un défi stratégique. MyData : renverser la relation consommateur, concrètement. Par Daniel Kaplan le 20/09/11 | 14 commentaires | 5,961 lectures | Impression En 2010, dans l’ouvrage Informatique, Libertés, Identités, nous posions la question : “Que pourrais-je accomplir, moi, si je disposais, sous une forme réellement exploitable, des informations sur mes trajets et mes communications des années passées ?

Pas seulement pour contrôler ce que d’autres en font, mais pour les utiliser à mes propres fins ?” Début 2011, en présentant les résultats de l’expédition de la Fing sur la Confiance numérique, nous allions plus loin : “A terme, la règle doit être simple : si vous savez quelque chose sur moi, je dois posséder la même information et pouvoir l’exploiter.” Le 13 avril 2011, le gouvernement britannique a transformé ce qui n’était encore qu’une perspective hétérodoxe, fragilement appuyée sur un projet de recherche américain et une petite communauté d’innovateurs, en un programme d’ampleur nationale : MyData. “Consumer Empowerment” : nous l’avions rêvé, ils le font.

VRM obs. Main Page - Project VRM. We're on your side | Insidr.