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PostCapitalism

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PostCapitalism: Envisaging a Shared Future | Keithpp's Blog. St Paul’s Cathedral Paul Mason signing PostCapitalism Paul Mason discussing PostCapitalism, the conclusions of a shared economy not the analysis, at St Paul’s in the City of London, under the auspices of St Paul’s Institute. St Paul’s within the heart of the City of London. Does capitalism have a heart? A couple of years ago, Occupy were camped outside offering a different narrative.

Capitalism is a complex system. Every complex system adapts to its environment, and in doing so, modifies its environment. Below St Paul’s, lies a Roman Temple dedicated to Diana. The Roman Temple was built by military occupiers, probably using slave labour. Capitalism is not set in stone, though the City of London would have us believe so. Capital used to finance innovation, invest in productive systems, this generated wealth, from which we all benefited. Post-WWII we had growth through the 1950s and 1960s. We are seeing boom and bust, bubbles, but no real growth. But this is not sustainable. A good question. PostCapitalism. * Book: PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future. By Paul Mason. Penguin, 2015 URL = 1. Jonathan Derbyshire: " It’s not a work of reportage, but of wide-ranging historical and economic analysis that is inspired by Marx’s analysis of capitalist social relations, but also goes some way beyond it (in ways, he acknowledges, that might not find favour with some of his friends on the far left).

The book is both an analysis of the crisis of what Mason calls “neoliberalism”—his shorthand for the version of highly financialised capitalism that has operated in most of the developed world for the past 30 years—and an attempt to imagine what might replace it. Capitalism, Mason writes, is a highly adaptive system: “At major turning points, it morphs and mutates in response to danger.” Mason is not alone in believing that humanity is on the cusp of a profound technological revolution, of course. 2.

They’re making money. Right. Paul Mason: 1. 1. Henryk Grossmann 2.0: A Critique of Paul Mason’s Book “PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future” | Fuchs. In 1857, Karl Marx (1857/1858, 161) described the emergence of “institutions […] whereby each individual can acquire information about the activity of all others” and can build “interconnections”. So it seems like it was not Tim Berners Lee, but Karl Marx, who invented the World Wide Web (see Fuchs 2014a, 17)! What sounds like a description of the Internet, was in fact an analysis of the lists of current prices that were important information sources for the organisation of trade in the 19th century.

Marx was not just a theorist of capitalism, but also one of communications (see Fuchs 2016d, 2009; De La Haye 1980) or what he termed the means of communication. It is therefore no surprise that not just the capitalist crisis, but also the rise of the Internet has led to an interest in Marx today. The journalist Paul Mason tries to join the field of digital Marxism with a popular science book titled PostCapitalism.

Who exactly is the progressive political subject for Paul Mason? References. PostCapitalism: A Guide to our Future. Mason discusses the existential threat posed to capitalism by the digital revolution. Mason argues that the digital revolution has the potential to reshape utterly our familiar notions of work, production and value; and to destroy an economy based on markets and private ownership—in fact, he contends, it is already doing so. He points to parallel currencies, co-operatives, self-managed online spaces, even Wikipedia. Mason argues that from the ashes of the global financial crisis, we have the chance to create a more socially just and sustainable global economy.[1] He presents a future of Utopian socialism.

[citation needed] Synopsis[edit] Section 1 draws particularly on the ideas of Nikolai Kondratiev, alongside Karl Marx, Rudolf Hilferding, Rosa Luxemburg, and Joseph Schumpeter. Mason argues that in earlier cycles, organised labour prevented capitalists from adapting to crises by reducing workers' wages. Key goals are: Suggested means to achieve this include: Reception[edit] References[edit] Henryk Grossman 2.0: A Critique of Paul Mason’s Book “PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future” | Fuchs. Henryk Grossmann 2.0: A Critique of Paul Mason’s Book “PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future” Christian Fuchs Abstract This article reviews Paul Mason’s book “PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future”. It discusses Mason’s version of long wave theory, the book’s interpretation of Karl Marx, its analysis of the Grundrisse’s “Fragment on Machines”, and aspects of political struggles and societal change.

The conclusion is that Paul Mason is digital Marxism’s Henryk Grossmann 2.0. Keywords Paul Mason; post-capitalism; postcapitalism; Karl Marx; digital media; digital Marxism; Internet Full Text: PDFHTML tripleC is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal (ISSN: 1726-670X). The end of capitalism has begun. The red flags and marching songs of Syriza during the Greek crisis, plus the expectation that the banks would be nationalised, revived briefly a 20th-century dream: the forced destruction of the market from above. For much of the 20th century this was how the left conceived the first stage of an economy beyond capitalism. The force would be applied by the working class, either at the ballot box or on the barricades. The lever would be the state. The opportunity would come through frequent episodes of economic collapse. Instead over the past 25 years it has been the left’s project that has collapsed.

If you lived through all this, and disliked capitalism, it was traumatic. As with the end of feudalism 500 years ago, capitalism’s replacement by postcapitalism will be accelerated by external shocks and shaped by the emergence of a new kind of human being. Postcapitalism is possible because of three major changes information technology has brought about in the past 25 years. PostCapitalism. Henryk Grossman 2.0: A Critique of Paul Mason’s Book “PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future” | Fuchs. In 1857, Karl Marx (1857/1858, 161) described the emergence of “institutions […] whereby each individual can acquire information about the activity of all others” and can build “interconnections”. So it seems like it was not Tim Berners Lee, but Karl Marx, who invented the World Wide Web (see Fuchs 2014a, 17)!

What sounds like a description of the Internet, was in fact an analysis of the lists of current prices that were important information sources for the organisation of trade in the 19th century. Marx was not just a theorist of capitalism, but also one of communications (see Fuchs 2016d, 2009; De La Haye 1980) or what he termed the means of communication. It is therefore no surprise that not just the capitalist crisis, but also the rise of the Internet has led to an interest in Marx today. The journalist Paul Mason tries to join the field of digital Marxism with a popular science book titled PostCapitalism. Who exactly is the progressive political subject for Paul Mason? References.