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Cyber-attaques / Cyber-attacks

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Cyberattack raises questions about growing internet vulnerabilities. Could millions of connected cameras, thermostats and kids' toys bring the internet to its knees?

Cyberattack raises questions about growing internet vulnerabilities

It's beginning to look that way. On Friday, epic cyberattacks crippled a major internet firm, repeatedly disrupting the availability of popular websites across the United States. Vagues de cyberattaques : la faille viendrait de l'Internet des objets. The massive cyberattack that hit the US hints at a new kind of cyberwarfare. Nobody seems to know just yet where the massive cyberattack that made major websites like Twitter and Spotify unavailable Friday morning originated.

The massive cyberattack that hit the US hints at a new kind of cyberwarfare

But whether the huge distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack originated in Russia, China, Eastern Europe or right here in the U.S., it’s a reminder of how vulnerable the infrastructure that our increasingly interconnected society relies on is, and makes the increasing willingness of government actors to engage in cyberattacks extremely worrying. Friday’s attack was aimed at Dyn, a domain name service provider that channels internet traffic to its clients. The company’s systems were overwhelmed briefly Friday by huge numbers of requests made simultaneously with the aim of crowding out legitimate web traffic.

Objets connectés et sécurité : pourquoi faut-il des normes ? 'Smart' devices 'too dumb' to fend off cyber-attacks, say experts. “Smart” internet-connected devices such as webcams, kettles and baby monitors are “too dumb” to resist the kind of cyber-attack that brought down some of the world’s most popular websites on Friday, experts have warned.

'Smart' devices 'too dumb' to fend off cyber-attacks, say experts

Richard Sims, a product development consultant at the Technology Partnership, said such devices – commonly referred to as the “internet of things” – often connect to the internet by default and use stock code from open-source software, which makes them easier to hack. Mercedes Bunz, a lecturer at the University of Westminster, said connected devices were not smart enough to have safety software installed, adding: “You can’t install a firewall on a baby monitor because it doesn’t have enough memory.”

Quand les objets connectés deviennent des armes pour attaquer Internet. Predicting the future using web intelligence can protect businesses from attack. Tiffany Lin From Github to the dark web, clues about where hackers will strike next are dropped like crumbs.

Predicting the future using web intelligence can protect businesses from attack

We just need to find them. That was the take away line from Staffan Truvé's talk at the inaugural WIRED Security event in Canary Wharf during which he explained how it is possible to predict the future online, and how the current methods of cyber defence aren't working. Aberkane - Ce que nous apprend la cyberattaque du "10-21" The DDOS attack yesterday reminds us of how vulnerable we are to flaws in technology — Quartz. For as long as there’s been an internet, its evangelists have assured us increased connectivity will yield a brighter future.

The DDOS attack yesterday reminds us of how vulnerable we are to flaws in technology — Quartz

The web, they’ve said, will bring us closer through new forms of mass communication, connect us to business and government to give us more power over our lives, and deliver a whole new world of goods and services. We got all that, and almost all of us have benefitted in some way from the fruits of the technology. But we also got massive disruptions and job losses in industries from banking to entertainment, the rise of menacing troll culture and—as we were reminded once again on Oct. 21—a frightening vulnerability to hacking, viruses, and other attacks.

Yesterday’s distributed denial of service attack, or DDoS, took advantage of the latest wave of innovation that we’ve been promised will only improve our lives: the Internet of Things. L'illusion d'un monde entièrement connecté vire au cauchemar. Cyber attack: hackers 'weaponised' everyday devices with malware to mount assault. The huge attack on global internet access, which blocked some of the world’s most popular websites, is believed to have been unleashed by hackers using common devices like webcams and digital recorders.

Cyber attack: hackers 'weaponised' everyday devices with malware to mount assault

Among the sites targeted on Friday were Twitter, Paypal and Spotify. All were customers of Dyn, an infrastructure company in New Hampshire in the US that acts as a switchboard for internet traffic. Outages were intermittent and varied by geography, but reportedly began in the eastern US before spreading to other parts of the country and Europe. Users complained they could not reach dozens of internet destinations, including Mashable, CNN, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Yelp and some businesses hosted by Amazon.

JT WE – Cyberattaque mondiale : la vulnérabilité des systèmes informatiques mise à nu.