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Jon Stewart Interviews Bruce Springsteen Pictures - The Freehold is Strong in That One. Cover Story Excerpt: Bruce Springsteen. The Feeling's Mutual. "Welcome, Canadians!

The Feeling's Mutual

" Even at soundcheck, Bruce Springsteen treats a New Jersey venue like his home, and Arcade Fire's Win Butler and Régine Chassagne are honored guests. "Did you guys finish your tour? " Watching from the floor of the Continental Airlines Arena hours before Springsteen's first official hometown show with the E Street Band in five years, house lights up, Butler shouts back that they wrapped up the American leg three days ago and will leave for Europe in two weeks. Springsteen nods, then leads his band through a version of "Backstreets; so sweeping it's a shame only five people are here to witness it. Bruce Springsteen David Letterman Interview The Rising. Bruce Springsteen: The Advocate Interview. While waiting to find out if his second Oscar-nominated song, "Dead Man Walking," will turn into a second win, Bruce Springsteen talks to the gay press for the first time "The bonus I got out of writing 'Streets of Philadelphia' was that all of a sudden I could go out and meet some gay man somewhere and he wouldn't be afraid to talk to me and say, 'Hey, that song really meant something to me.' My image had always been very heterosexual, very straight.

So it was a nice experience for me, a chance to clarify my own feelings about gay and lesbian civil rights," says rock's most thoughtful megastar, Bruce Springsteen. Landau's Creative Touch with Springsteen. Billboard, Jun 13, 1992 by Thom Duffy NEW YORK--On June 15, Bruce Springsteen will kick off his first worldwide tour in four years in Stockholm, showcasing his two new Columbia Records albums "Human Touch" and "Lucky Town" with a new band--guitarist Shane Fontayne, drummer Zachary Alford, bassist Tommy Simms, and E Street Band keyboardist Roy Bittan.

He previewed the tour June 5 with a live international broadcast from Los Angeles syndicated by the Album Network and will open his U.S. tour at New Jersey's Meadowlands Arena July 23. Columbia Radio Hour Interview. Transcript from: [Bruce Springsteen was interviewed by Bob Costas about "The Ghost of Tom Joad" and other subjects for the Columbia Radio Hour. The syndicated broadcast aired on various stations in late November of 1995.

Columbia Radio Hour Interview Pt. 2. Transcript from: [Bruce Springsteen was interviewed by Bob Costas about "The Ghost of Tom Joad" and other subjects for the Columbia Radio Hour. The syndicated broadcast aired on various stations in late November of 1995. Most of the interview is transcribed here and on subsequent pages.] ["Youngstown"] Under The Boss' Skin. Los Angeles Times, Sunday, April 1, 2001 by Robert Hilburn Wanting a new song for the final shows of his 1999-2000 reunion tour with the E Street Band, Bruce Springsteen thumbed through his notebook early last year and noticed the words "American Skin. " It felt like the ideal title for a song he wanted write about race relations in America. In drafting the song, Springsteen drew on images from a highly publicized 1999 incident in which four white New York City policemen shot an unarmed black West African immigrant, Amadou Diallo, 41 times.

Bruce Springsteen: Chords for Change. The New York Times, August 5, 2004, nytimes.com by Bruce Springsteen A nation's artists and musicians have a particular place in its social and political life. Over the years I've tried to think long and hard about what it means to be American: about the distinctive identity and position we have in the world, and how that position is best carried. I've tried to write songs that speak to our pride and criticize our failures. These questions are at the heart of this election: who we are, what we stand for, why we fight.

Through my work, I've always tried to ask hard questions. I don't think People have different notions of these values, and they live them out in different ways. Like many others, in the aftermath of 9/11, I felt the country's unity. It is through the truthful exercising of the best of human qualities - respect for others, honesty about ourselves, faith in our ideals - that we come to life in God's eyes.

Springsteen: "We've Been Misled" Rolling Stone, September 22, 2004, RollingStone.com by Jann S. Wenner Do you see these Vote for Change concerts reaching undecided voters, or are they more to rally the energy of people who have made up their minds? I always felt that the musician's job, as I experienced it growing up, was to provide an alternative source of information, a spiritual and social rallying place, somewhere you went to have a communal experience. Backstreets Presents: The Darkness Television Interviews. A rebroadcast interview with Bruce Springsteen.

From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bru

DoubleTake 12: Will Percy Interviews Bruce Springsteen. Nick Hornby talks to Bruce Springsteen. Earlier on in the week that I met Bruce Springsteen, and before I knew I was going to meet him, I'd decided I was going to send him a copy of my new book.

Nick Hornby talks to Bruce Springsteen

I got his home address off a mutual friend, and signed it to him, and the book was lying around in my office in an unstamped Jiffy bag when the editor of this magazine asked if I'd like to do this interview. So I took the book with me. I wasn't expecting him to read the bloody thing, nor even to keep it, and yet even so it seemed like something I needed to do.

Bruce Springsteen: 'What was done to my country was un-American' At a Paris press conference on Thursday night, Bruce Springsteen was asked whether he was advocating an armed uprising in America.

Bruce Springsteen: 'What was done to my country was un-American'

He laughed at the idea, but that the question was even posed at all gives you some idea of the fury of his new album Wrecking Ball. Indeed, it is as angry a cry from the belly of a wounded America as has been heard since the dustbowl and Woody Guthrie, a thundering blow of New Jersey pig iron down on the heads of Wall Street and all who have sold his country down the swanny. Interview with Bruce Springsteen: a new president provides the Boss with fresh optimism. It's a cold winter's day, and I'm driving through snowy fields on my way to meet Bruce Springsteen.

Interview with Bruce Springsteen: a new president provides the Boss with fresh optimism

Towards the end of the 18th century, a Scottish emigré came to this part of northern New Jersey in search of a new world. He bought land, built a house for his family and settled down to the life of a farmer. The ducks and chickens are still here, but the current owner lives a very different life. Bruce Springsteen and I struck up a friendship 10 years ago when I came to this same farm to make a film for the BBC. Classic Bruce Springsteen Interview: How Born To Run Saved The Boss.

Actor Ed Norton Interviews Bruce Springsteen On 'Darkness On The Edge Of Town' And 'The Promise' Hide captionBruce Springsteen and Ed Norton talk on stage at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. George Pimentel/WireImage for TIFF Bruce Springsteen and Ed Norton talk on stage at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. In 1975, the album Born to Run catapulted Bruce Springsteen from a regional critical favorite to a worldwide megastar.

But after Born to Run's release, a legal battle with his former manager, Mike Appel, kept Springsteen from making a follow-up album for nearly two years. Springsteen spent his time touring extensively across the U.S. with the E Street Band. Actor Ed Norton Interviews Bruce Springsteen On 'Darkness On The Edge Of Town' And 'The Promise' Bruce Springsteen (Interview, 1983)

Musician, Feb 1981 by Dave Marsh Springsteen returns from his two year marathon in the studio and introduces some new characters and insights along with some older influences, roaring to life the cylinders of his instinctive sense of emotional event. Dave Marsh examines the view from inside the mind of the last Roadside Romantic. A year ago, taking a respite from recording to play two nights of the M.U.S.E anti-nuke concerts, Bruce Springsteen pared his normal three hour show down to a more everyday 90 minutes: The result was pandemonium just this side of Beatlemania.

Springsteen on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.