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Teenagers and Digital Technologies - Research

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Risks, Opportunities, and Realities of Children's Internet Usage: A Few Moments with Sonia Livingstone. As Social Psychology Professor and Head of the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Sonia Livingstone is one of the most respected researchers in the growing sector of children’s online risk and safety.

Risks, Opportunities, and Realities of Children's Internet Usage: A Few Moments with Sonia Livingstone

Livingstone directs LSE’s research project, EU Kids Online, a 25-nation thematic network funded by the EC’s Safer Internet Programme looking at children, young people and the Internet in an effort to supply policy makers with the best possible advice on how to educate and protect against online risks and opportunities. This past September, she and members of her network released one of the largest studies of its kind to date, Risks and Safety on the Internet, a detailed, face-to-face survey, which interviewed 25,000 European children and their parents across 25 countries. Presentations and outputs - EU Kids Online - Research - Department of Media and Communications. Books O'Neill, B., Staksrud, E., & McLaughlin, S. (2013)Towards a better internet for children?

Presentations and outputs - EU Kids Online - Research - Department of Media and Communications

Policy pillars, players and paradoxes. Gothenburg: NordicomFlyer and purchase information| Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Görzig, A. (eds) (2012). Www.spirto.health.ed.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/SPIRTO_Newsletter_Feb2014.pdf. The experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites. The experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites NSPCC research February 2014 This report describes the experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites and the strategies they use to deal with things that upset them online.

The experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites

Researchers conducted an online self completion survey in December 2012 of 1,024 11-16 year olds in the UK. New Tab. Global Social Media Impact Study Blog UCL UCL Social Networking Sites & Social Science Research Project. The Little Prince is probably the novel which I have read the most times.

Global Social Media Impact Study Blog UCL UCL Social Networking Sites & Social Science Research Project

Each time I read it, I am warmly touched. Amid field work, I am reading it again. My favorite part is the conversation between the fox and the little prince, when the fox tells the little prince that meaning of ‘to tame’ is to ‘establish ties’. “Just that,” said the fox. “To me, you are still nothing more than a little boy who is just like a hundred thousand other little boys.

I have to quote the whole lot what the fox said, not only because it is beautifully written, but also it reminders me of a recent talk between myself and my informant LX about QQ (social media) permission settings. 5 sites teens flock to instead of Facebook - Slide Show. If your kids aren’t on Facebook, where are they?

5 sites teens flock to instead of Facebook - Slide Show

Try Snapchat, a start-up Mark Zuckerberg reportedly just tried -- and failed -- to acquire for $3 billion. There’s no need to burn after reading: This app’s files self-destruct. The service is designed for savvy teenagers who don’t want to leave an Internet footprint. Released in September 2011, users can send “Snaps” — photos or videos — that last between 1 and 10 seconds, depending on the limit set by the sender. It already has 100 million users and 350 million snaps sent daily, according to a spokeswoman for the app. Launched in November 2012, this mobile app allows users to create and share videos, photos and voice tracks, plus make live broadcasts and share posts of 420 characters or less. This app has lofty goals: Develop a “social art community,” and bring art to children around the world.

Www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/lse olol final3.pdf. Www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/research/socialmediasociallife-final-061812.pdf. Beyond the digital divide: young people and ICT - CfBT. This website uses anonymous cookies to improve your experience of our website.

Beyond the digital divide: young people and ICT - CfBT

Read more Beyond the digital divide: young people and ICT Date: 17 June 2013 The concept of the 'digital divide' has long been used to justify provision of free or discounted computer equipment to school students in the UK, yet 95% of households with children now have access to the internet. Only 3% of the nation's young people can be described as 'non-users' (with no access to the internet anywhere), a group that is not representative of any one socioeconomic class. This perspective paper, and its technical paper companion, describe the results of a literature review which investigates the digital divide in the UK.

This report makes a number of key recommendations in the form of challenges to some of the debate's key stakeholders: Research library Anna Riggall Research manager Email Email Anna. Part 3: Reputation Management on Social Media. By Amanda Lenhart, Kristen Purcell, Aaron Smith and Kathryn Zickuhr Overview Since 2006, blogging has dropped among teens and young adults while simultaneously rising among older adults.

Part 3: Reputation Management on Social Media

As the tools and technology embedded in social networking sites change, and use of the sites continues to grow, youth may be exchanging ‘macro-blogging’ for microblogging with status updates. Blogging has declined in popularity among both teens and young adults since 2006. Blog commenting has also dropped among teens. Thoughts on Pew’s latest report: notable findings on race and privacy. Yesterday, Pew Internet and American Life Project (in collaboration with Berkman) unveiled a brilliant report about “Teens, Social Media, and Privacy.”

thoughts on Pew’s latest report: notable findings on race and privacy

As a researcher who’s been in the trenches on these topics for a long time now, none of their finding surprised me but it still gives me absolute delight when our data is so beautifully in synch. I want to quickly discuss two important issues that this report raise. Race is a factor in explaining differences in teen social media use. Pew provides important measures on shifts in social media, including the continued saturation of Facebook, the decline of MySpace, and the rise of other social media sites (e.g., Twitter, Instagram).

Media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_TeensSocialMediaandPrivacy_FINAL.pdf. How Teens Share Information on Social Media.

EU KIDS Research Database

Teens on Facebook: What They Share with Friends. The typical (median) teen Facebook user has 300 friends.

Teens on Facebook: What They Share with Friends

The larger a teen’s network, the more likely they are to have a wider variety of friends and share more personal information. In the interactive below, click through the range of network ‘friend’ sizes to see changes in what they share, and how they compare to all teen Facebook users. The % of Facebook-using teens who say they have shared their… *