Brazilian Jiujitsu

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Grappling Positions. Stand-up positions[edit] Called clinch position or standing grappling position, these are the core of clinch fighting.

Grappling Positions

From a separated stand-up position, a clinch is the result of one or both fighters applying a clinch hold. The process of attempting to advance into more dominant clinch positions is known as pummelling. The major types of standing clinch are such as: Ground positions[edit] There is a rough hierarchy of major ground grappling positions form the most advantageous to the least for the "top" fighter: *Fighters are disengaged if neither has a grip on the other they can use to restrict their movement Examples[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Gracie; Renzo, Gracie, Royler; Peligro, Kid; Danaher, John (2001). North-South Position. Kami shiho gatame[edit] A Brazilian Jiu Jitsu practitioner works north south position in tournament Kami shiho gatame (上四方固, "upper four quarter hold down"), and its variations kuzure kami shiho gatame (崩上四方固, "broken upper four quarter hold down"), are the most common pinning holds applied from the north–south position in combat sports using a gi[citation needed].

North-South Position

Kami shiho gatame involves pinning the opponent's arms to his or her side, typically by grabbing the opponent's belt and using the arms to press the arms of the opponent inwards. Kuzure-kami-shiho-gatame is similar, except that one or both arms of the opponent aren't pinned to the side, but can be controlled by for instance pinning them in between an upper arm and a knee. Kami shiho gatame is one of the seven mat holds, Osaekomi-waza, of Kodokan Judo. Shiho gatame is also one of the 25 techniques of Danzan Ryu's constriction arts, Shimete, list. Side Control. Kata-gatame[edit] The kata gatame (肩固, "shoulder hold") is a pinning hold where the opponent is held around the head, with one of the opponent's arms pinned against his or her neck.

Side Control

It can be done from kesa-gatame in response to an opponent's escape attempt, during which the arm is pinned against his or her neck, and the hold around the neck is put in place. Half Guard. Back Mount. Offense[edit] Defense[edit] To remove chest to back contact, the mounted opponent can grab an attacker's wrist with two hands and move it over his head to the other side.

Back Mount

If the mounted opponent is much larger/stronger than the mounting fighter, he may actually be able to stand up and slam his opponent into a nearby wall or fall backwards onto his back (and opponent). Doing this with enough force may knock the wind out of the dominant opponent, or at least enable one to break free. Another standard escape involves the mounted opponent touching his head to the ground to temporarily prevent against a choke while also attempting to roll into the dominant opponent's guard. Mount. A choke applied from the mount Many chokes, especially collar chokes, are also available from the mounted position.

Mount

Such chokes are generally limited to sporting contestants who wear a gi or, in real-life combat, opponents wearing thick jackets, which provide a collar as an aid to choking, but attempting them at a gi-less situation can be successful if the performer manages to hold his opponent. Other submissions such as the Triangle Choke, Arm Triangle and the Gogoplata can be used from the mount but are less common. Pinning holds in budō from the mount include tate shiho gatame (縦四方固, "horizontal four quarters hold", also called hon-tate-shiho-gatame,[1] 本縦四方固), which is similar to kata-gatame except that it is performed from the mount.

Submissions. A grappling hold (commonly referred to simply as a hold; in Japanese referred to as katame-waza, 固め技, "grappling technique") is a grappling, wrestling, judo or other martial arts term for a specific grip that is applied to an opponent.

Submissions

Holds are principally used to control the opponent, and to advance in points or positioning. Holds may be categorized by their function such as clinching, pinning, pain compliance or submission, while others can be classified by their anatomical effect: chokehold, joint-lock or compression lock. Joint Locks. A joint lock is a grappling technique involving manipulation of an opponent's joints in such a way that the joints reach their maximal degree of motion.

Joint Locks

In judō these are referred to as, 関節技 kansetsu-waza, "joint locking technique"[1]) and in Chinese martial arts as chin na which literally means "catching and locking". In judo, the combining of standing locks with throws are forbidden due to the risk of physical harm to the falling opponent, while jujutsu, taijutsu, aikido and hapkido allow their use. Joint locks can be divided into five general types according to which section of the body they affect: These general types can be further divided into subtypes according to which specific joint(s) they affect, or the type of motion they involve.

Spinal Locks. Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks.

Spinal Locks

Primarily a feature of some martial arts and wrestling, a 2007 news article reported the dangerous use of spinal locks in Australia's National Rugby League.[1] Neck crank[edit] A neck crank (sometimes also referred to as a neck lock, and technically known as a cervical lock) is a spinal lock applied to the cervical spine causing hyperextension, hyperflexion, lateral hyperflexion, hyperrotation or extension-distraction, either through bending, twisting or elongating. Cattle Catch (Reverse Crucifix) Can Opener. Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks.

Can Opener

Primarily a feature of some martial arts and wrestling, a 2007 news article reported the dangerous use of spinal locks in Australia's National Rugby League.[1] Neck crank[edit] A neck crank (sometimes also referred to as a neck lock, and technically known as a cervical lock) is a spinal lock applied to the cervical spine causing hyperextension, hyperflexion, lateral hyperflexion, hyperrotation or extension-distraction, either through bending, twisting or elongating. Crucifix. Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks.

Crucifix

Primarily a feature of some martial arts and wrestling, a 2007 news article reported the dangerous use of spinal locks in Australia's National Rugby League.[1] Neck crank[edit] A neck crank (sometimes also referred to as a neck lock, and technically known as a cervical lock) is a spinal lock applied to the cervical spine causing hyperextension, hyperflexion, lateral hyperflexion, hyperrotation or extension-distraction, either through bending, twisting or elongating. Neck Cranks. Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks. Primarily a feature of some martial arts and wrestling, a 2007 news article reported the dangerous use of spinal locks in Australia's National Rugby League.[1]

Twister. Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks. Primarily a feature of some martial arts and wrestling, a 2007 news article reported the dangerous use of spinal locks in Australia's National Rugby League.[1] Neck crank[edit] A neck crank (sometimes also referred to as a neck lock, and technically known as a cervical lock) is a spinal lock applied to the cervical spine causing hyperextension, hyperflexion, lateral hyperflexion, hyperrotation or extension-distraction, either through bending, twisting or elongating.

Armlocks. Armbar[edit] A fighter attempts to escape from an armbar by slamming the opponent to the ground. Judo black belt applying a jūji-gatame (armbar) against her opponent. Flying armbar[edit] Armbar. Armbar[edit] A fighter attempts to escape from an armbar by slamming the opponent to the ground. Judo black belt applying a jūji-gatame (armbar) against her opponent. Flying armbar[edit] Kimura. Kimura from Guard. Keylock. Detailed Americana. Omoplata. Wristlock. Chokeholds. The terminology used varies; in most martial arts, the term "chokehold" or "choke" is used for all types of grappling holds that strangle. This can be misleading as most holds aim to strangle not choke with the exception of "air chokes" (choking means "to have severe difficulty in breathing because of a constricted or obstructed throat or a lack of air"[2]).

Rear Naked Choke. Rear Naked Choke (Stephen Kesting) Guillotine Choke. Guillotine Choke (Submissions101) Ezekiel Choke (Sode Guruma Jime) Sōde guruma jime (袖車絞め?) Ezekiel from Guard (Koji Komuro) Ezekiel from Mount. Ezekiel Choke (Koji Komuro) NoGi Ezekiel (Erik Paulson) Arm Triangle Choke. Arm triangle choke, side choke, or head and arm choke are generic terms describing blood chokeholds in which the opponent is strangled in between his or her own shoulder and the practitioner's arm. Arm Triangle Theory (Sub101) Arm Triangle Choke 101. 5 Triangle Options. Triangle Choke. Intro to Triangle Choke.

Triangle Choke 101. Triangle Choke: 4 Most Common Errors. D'arce Choke. Peruvian Neck Tie. Peruvian Necktie with Head and Arm Control. Peruvian Necktie (Submissions101) Anaconda Choke. Anaconda Choke (Submissions101)