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Economia Colaborativa

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Uber, society and economy. Uber + Airbnb. Economie collaborative & Ville contributive.

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Uber. Gig Economy. Sharing economy. Never Mind the Sharing Economy: Here’s Platform Capitalism. 1.

Never Mind the Sharing Economy: Here’s Platform Capitalism

A Backlash Against Sharing? Sharing economy review: terms of reference. O que aprendi ao co-fundar uma startup da “economia colaborativa” e por que saí dela. Myth of the sharing economy: There's no such thing. We-commerce: The sharing economy's uncertain path to changing the world - Feature. Peer-to-peer collaboration is gaining ground and changing the economics of the future, but there are questions to answer and obstacles to overcome.

We-commerce: The sharing economy's uncertain path to changing the world - Feature

Here's a typical story you're hearing about the sharing economy: Millennial needs ride to music festival. She lives 15 minutes from downtown, which has hardly any parking, and her city doesn't have an efficient public transportation system. No cabs are available. She remembers the ride sharing service Lyft recently came to her city and downloads the app.

The Rise of the "Sharing" Economy  Share communities, in which people around the world offer for rent things they own, are becoming a bona fide economic phenomenon.

The Rise of the "Sharing" Economy 

Today's established comfort level with conducting online transactions has opened the door for sharing personal property via the Internet that may have seemed unfathomable even a few short years ago. Companies on- and offline need to understand how to respond, given how many people are interested in participating, both geographically and among all age groups.

Myth of the sharing economy: There's no such thing. The sharing economy is a lie: Uber, Ayn Rand and the truth about tech and libertarians. Horror stories about the increasingly unpopular taxi service Uber have been commonplace in recent months, but there is still much to be learned from its handling of the recent hostage drama in downtown Sydney, Australia.

The sharing economy is a lie: Uber, Ayn Rand and the truth about tech and libertarians

We’re told that we reveal our true character in moments of crisis, and apparently that’s as true for companies as it is for individuals. A number of experts have challenged the idea that the horrific explosion of violence in a Sydney café was “terrorism,” since the attacker was mentally unbalanced and acted alone. But, terror or not, the ordeal was certainly terrifying. Amid the chaos and uncertainty, the city believed itself to be under a coordinated and deadly attack. Vale mais compartilhar que ter.

The Disruptive Nature of the Sharing Economy: Finding the Next Great Opportunities. Many of us suffer from a sinister and often contagious disorder, something I call just-in-case disease.

The Disruptive Nature of the Sharing Economy: Finding the Next Great Opportunities

We own toolboxes full of tools, just in case we need to fix something. We have kitchens full of appliances just in case we want to prepare a meal. We have cars in our garages just in case we need to go somewhere. Platform Cooperativism. Platform Cooperativism vs. the Sharing Economy. The backlash against unethical labor practices in the “collaborative sharing economy” has been overplayed.

Platform Cooperativism vs. the Sharing Economy

Recently, The Washington Post, New York Times and others started to rail against online labor brokerages like Taskrabbit, Handy, and Uber because of an utter lack of concern for their workers. At the recent Digital Labor conference, my colleague McKenzie Wark proposed that the modes of production that we appear to be entering are not quite capitalism as classically described. “This is not capitalism,” he said, “this is something worse.” [1] But just for one moment imagine that the algorithmic heart of any of these citadels of anti-unionism could be cloned and brought back to life under a different ownership model, with fair working conditions, as a humane alternative to the free market model.

What If Uber Were a Unionized, Worker-Owned Co-Op? These Denver Cabbies Are Making It Happen by Mary Hansen. Wolde Gebremariam is one of more than 160,000 people nationwide who drive their own cars for Uber.

What If Uber Were a Unionized, Worker-Owned Co-Op? These Denver Cabbies Are Making It Happen by Mary Hansen

Based in Denver, Gebremariam, age 28, drives his Chevy SUV for the company and occasionally works as a private limo driver. “The labor movement has to bring ownership and equity into the picture.” Uber built its $40 billion business around a mobile-based application that connects drivers with riders. Arcade City: Decentralized, Blockchain-Based Answer to Uber. The city of Portsmouth, New Hampshire passed an ordinance regulating ride-sharing services that took effect in September of 2015.

Arcade City: Decentralized, Blockchain-Based Answer to Uber

The ordinance made driving with Uber and other ride-sharing companies illegal within the city limits. Christopher David, a former Uber driver, launched the Free Uber campaign using Bitcoin prize pools to incentivize activism protesting the ordinance. Sharing economy firms like Uber and Airbnb are burning cash at a phenomenal rate. An audience member at the Sharing & On Demand Economy Conference recently questioned a panel of entrepreneurs on whether people will possess anything of their own in years to come, be it their own home, their own car, their own wedding dress, or even their own power drill.

Sharing economy firms like Uber and Airbnb are burning cash at a phenomenal rate

Owning things is expensive and finding places to store unnecessary luxuries in a world that’s becoming increasingly densely populated could be seen as cumbersome, according to Alex Stephany, the former CEO of drive rental platform JustPark. Entrepreneurs operating in the sharing economy, which is underpinned by the internet and the rise of smartphones, are describing their businesses as revolutionary, with Uber’s Travis Kalanick saying his taxi-hailing app is changing the way people travel across the world.

“We want transportation to be as reliable as running water everywhere for everyone,” Kalanick said at Salesforce’s annual conference in September. Show me the money UK government and the sharing economy. Uber Bonds Term Sheet Reveals $470 Million in Operating Losses. Uber Technologies Inc. is telling prospective investors that it generates $470 million in operating losses on $415 million in revenue, according to a document provided to prospective investors.

Uber Bonds Term Sheet Reveals $470 Million in Operating Losses

The term sheet viewed by Bloomberg News, which is being used to sell $1 billion to $1.2 billion in convertible bonds, doesn’t make clear the time period for those results. The document also touts 300 percent year-over-year growth. The figures show the heavy losses that Uber is accruing as it expands its global car-booking operation amid fierce local competition. Uber is already operating in more than 300 cities worldwide and is raising money at a $50 billion valuation, a person familiar with the situation said last month. Can we build a humane alternative to Uber? By now, most people have recognized “the sharing economy” as more a convenient slogan than as heralding a new era of prosperity. Thanks to forward-thinking platforms such as Airbnb and Uber, we were told, the sharing economy would let people work in whole new ways.

But lately there’s been turmoil in what’s now more widely known as the on-demand or gig economy. Upset at persistent fare cuts, Uber drivers have staged strikes in New York, San Francisco, and Pittsburgh. The strikes occurred despite a lack of union representation, though the Seattle city council recently passed a law that, if upheld, would let Uber and Lyft drivers unionize.

What might a Coop Uber look like? (or should we be thinking bigger)? Given Uber's ability – in spite of owning no cars and employing no drivers – to swiftly grow and dominate any market it enters, there's understandably a lot of interest in a driver-owned Coop competitor, not least amidst growing controversies and opposition.