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INTERACTIONS

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Teachers TV- How Do They Do It In Sweden? Talking with Babies and Toddlers June05. PowerfulInteractions. The power of positive relationships. Effective Teacher-Child Interactions. Nottingham, James, 2015. Challenging Learning: theory, effective practice and lesson ideas to create optimal learning in the classroom, Routledge. Fisher, Julie, 2016. Interacting or Interfering? Improving Interactions in the Early Years, Open University Press and McGraw-Hill Education. Dweck, Carol, 2007. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Ballantine Books. Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve. How can parents and teachers best educate young children?

What principles can both teachers and parents bring to the education of very young children? Gillian Craig, who was part of the Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy writing team, explains. As teachers and parents, we follow certain principles in our roles. Often though, these principles overlap and all we need to do is recognise and reinforce these areas. Ask (the right) questions When my daughter came out of her class one day shortly after her course started, I asked her, 'What did you do in class today? '. Although my daughter is only two years old, (and more experienced parents than me would not have asked such a broad question to start with), questioning our children at any age about what they have done in class is a natural thing to do. Similarly, a child’s artwork can provide a prompt for asking questions: 'What (or who) is it?

' Teachers also want their students to reflect on their lessons, but with young children especially, this is a learned skill. Reinforce desirable behaviour. A longitudinal investigation of the role of quantity and quality of child-directed speech in vocabulary development. The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids -- New York Magazine. What do we make of a boy like Thomas? Thomas (his middle name) is a fifth-grader at the highly competitive P.S. 334, the Anderson School on West 84th.

Slim as they get, Thomas recently had his long sandy-blond hair cut short to look like the new James Bond (he took a photo of Daniel Craig to the barber). Unlike Bond, he prefers a uniform of cargo pants and a T-shirt emblazoned with a photo of one of his heroes: Frank Zappa. Thomas hangs out with five friends from the Anderson School. They are “the smart kids.” Thomas’s one of them, and he likes belonging. Since Thomas could walk, he has heard constantly that he’s smart. But as Thomas has progressed through school, this self-awareness that he’s smart hasn’t always translated into fearless confidence when attacking his schoolwork. For instance, in the early grades, Thomas wasn’t very good at spelling, so he simply demurred from spelling out loud.

Thomas is not alone. Why just a single line of praise? Why did this happen? That sold me. Selective mutism. Selective mutism is a severe anxiety disorder where a person is unable to speak in certain social situations, such as with classmates at school or to relatives they don't see very often. It usually starts during childhood and, left untreated, can persist into adulthood. A child or adult with selective mutism doesn't refuse or choose not to speak, they're literally unable to speak.

The expectation to talk to certain people triggers a freeze response with feelings of panic, rather like a bad case of stage fright, and talking is impossible. In time, the person will learn to anticipate the situations that provoke this distressing reaction and do all they can to avoid them. However, people with selective mutism are able to speak freely to certain people, such as close family and friends, when nobody else is around to trigger the freeze response. Selective mutism affects about 1 in 140 young children. This page covers the following areas: Signs of selective mutism What causes selective mutism?

Assessment of Attention in Preschoolers. Being Multilingual. Inclusion Development Programme Behaviour Emotional Social Difficulties. B480 Special Need Publication A4 V5 Final MR. Teaching English to learners with Special Educational Needs (SENs) – Myths and realities. ‘I know I have children with special educational needs in my class, I want to help them and we are supposed to promote inclusion, but I really am not sure how to do this’ Vera, primary teacher from Spain ‘Some of the children in my class are really badly behaved, they can’t sit still, don’t finish their work and are always calling out. I think they might have a learning difficulty, but I don’t know what to do’ Kris, secondary teacher from Poland Do you feel like these teachers?

Myth 1 – You have to be a specialist psychologist or specially trained teacher to know how to teach these learners No, you don’t. Myth 2 – other learners in the class make less progress when they are taught with learners with SENs No, this is not necessarily the case. Myth 3 – learners with SENs cannot learn languages No, this does not have to be true. Myth 4 – it takes a lot of extra time and planning No. Myth 5 – a teacher can’t ‘fix’ the learner’s problem so there is nothing I can do Definitely not true. 1. 2. 3. 4. Selective mutism. Assessment of Attention in Preschoolers.