background preloader

Ancient egypt

Facebook Twitter

Old Kingdom. The Old Kingdom is the name given to the period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization – the first of three so-called "Kingdom" periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile Valley (the others being Middle Kingdom and the New Kingdom).

Old Kingdom

The term itself was coined by eighteenth-century historians and the distinction between the Old Kingdom and the Early Dynastic Period is not one which would have been recognized by Ancient Egyptians. Not only was the last king of the Early Dynastic Period related to the first two kings of the Old Kingdom, but the 'capital', the royal residence, remained at Ineb-Hedg, the Ancient Egyptian name for Memphis. The basic justification for a separation between the two periods is the revolutionary change in architecture accompanied by the effects on Egyptian society and economy of large-scale building projects.[1] Third Dynasty[edit] Fourth Dynasty[edit] Fifth Dynasty[edit] Sixth Dynasty[edit] History of Egypt. The history of Egypt has been long and rich, due to the flow of the Nile river, with its fertile banks and delta. Its rich history also comes from its native inhabitants and outside influence. Much of Egypt's ancient history was a mystery until the secrets of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs were deciphered with the discovery and help of the Rosetta Stone.

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing. The Lighthouse of Alexandria, one of the other Seven Wonders, is gone. The Library of Alexandria was the only one of its kind for centuries. Prehistory (pre–3100 BC)[edit] There is evidence of rock carvings along the Nile terraces and in desert oases. Category:Ancient Egyptian King lists - Wikipedia, the free encyc. Third Intermediate Period of Egypt - Wikipedia, the free encyclo. Political factions fractured ancient Egypt during the Third Intermediate Period.

Third Intermediate Period of Egypt - Wikipedia, the free encyclo

The boundaries above show the political situation during the mid-8th century BCE. The Third Intermediate Period of Ancient Egypt begins with the death of Pharaoh Ramesses XI in 1070 BC, ending the New Kingdom, and ends with the start of the Late period, for which various points are offered, though it is most often regarded as dating from the foundation of the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty by Psamtik I in 664 BC, following the expulsion of the Nubian rulers of the Twenty-Fifth Dynasty by the Assyrians under King Assurbanipal. The period was one of decline and political instability, marked by division of the state for much of the period and conquest and rule by foreigners. But many aspects of life for ordinary Egyptians changed relatively little. 25th Dynasty Nuri pyramids Twenty-first Dynasty[edit]