Revolucion que viene o no viene

Facebook Twitter
amazon
Why 3D Printing Is Overhyped (I Should Know, I Do It For a Living) The first laser printer I ever saw was the size of a van. It required a mainframe to operate. There was a dot matrix printer sitting right next to it because it was still a bad solution for most print jobs. A few years later we had one in our house. A few years after that they were ubiquitous. (And a few years after that they had been largely replaced by ink jets!) Why 3D Printing Is Overhyped (I Should Know, I Do It For a Living)
Autodesk : mythes et réalités de l'impression 3D Autodesk : mythes et réalités de l'impression 3D Carl Bass, président d’Autodesk, a publié une longue tribune sur le site de Wired pour donner son point de vue sur l’impression 3D. Un avis de poids, alors qu’Autodesk se penche de plus en plus sur cette technologie pour revitaliser sa gamme de logiciels de modélisation. (Pour accéder à l'article original en anglais, cliquez ici ) L’impression 3D n’a rien d’une nouvelle technologie. Les premiers brevets correspondants remontent au début des années 80, et les progrès n’ont cessé depuis de perfectionner ce nouvel outil de fabrication s'inscrivant dans une chaîne numérique.
Seven Things You Must Know About 3D Printing Seven Things You Must Know About 3D Printing Many Fabbaloo readers are new to the idea of 3D printing. You may have been attracted to the technology because you've seen it on the web, or perhaps someone told you about it. But not having experienced it directly, there are some things you should know. It's Slow. Do not expect Star Trek Replicator speed with today's 3D printers. The most expensive commercial units take many hours, or even days, to produce even medium-sized objects.
FabLab. La nouvelle révolution industrielle
Future of Digital Fabrication Blows 3D Printing Out of the Water Just when I thought I’d heard it all in the latest 3D Printing news, I went to a meeting last week at MIT on Digital Fabrication that just blew 3D Printing out of the water. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP] asked Neil Gershenfeld, Director of the Center for Bits and Atoms at MIT, to organize a meeting that allowed the digital fabrication community to voice their needs for policy and programs to the Executive Branch. Tom Kalil, the OSTP Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation, made clear “the President believes manufacturing is important to the future of the nation. Since R&D and manufacturing are coupled, the White House believes that if manufacturing goes off-shore, then R&D will follow.” Future of Digital Fabrication Blows 3D Printing Out of the Water
8 Hackerspaces Changing the Arab World
Open source hardware meets the p2p economy Open source hardware meets the p2p economy We are at this moment in history when we can say with certainty that open source hardware (OSHW) is economically viable. The video below tells the success story of Adafruit Industries. Barely formed, this business model relying on OSHW might already be obsolete.
A 3-D Printer For Every Home! (Yeah, Right) A 3-D Printer For Every Home! (Yeah, Right) There are a few Holy Grails on the Internet--things that thou shalt not touch because the Internet is still pretty much run by geeks. You can’t criticize the hilarity and hive mind intelligence of memes, even when they’re, you know, really stupid. You can’t discuss the potential reasoning behind DRM, even when, to be a little fair, the web is a fantasy land of copyright infringement. But maybe, more than any of these, thou shalt not question the obvious, inevitable future of 3-D printing.
NEW YORK — The DIY enthusiasts involved in today's "maker movement" love experimenting with 3D printers to turn digital designs into real-life objects made of plastic, metal, even chocolate. But one of the leading do-it-yourself pioneers has come forth to explain why he really dislikes the 3D printing craze and sees it as just a steppingstone to something greater. Modern 3D printers use lasers or squirt hot materials to build objects layer by layer from a computer design. They represent the latest in a long line of computer-controlled tools dating back to the 1950s — a more refined way of "metal bashing metal, squirt squirt," said Neil Gershenfeld, director of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms. Why a DIY Pioneer Dislikes 3D Printing | Maker Movement Why a DIY Pioneer Dislikes 3D Printing | Maker Movement
3D printing revolution – a few thoughts | Creating open source soil for joint development
Telkom and Korea's KT Corp are edging steadily nearer to a deal. Now they need shareholder support. Telkom is inching closer to a deal with Korea’s KT Corp, the JSE-listed fixed-line operator told shareholders on Wednesday. The operator once again renewed a cautionary notice to shareholders about the talks, which it first revealed in October 2011. According to a new statement from Telkom, the two companies have completed a “diagnostic review and harmonised their respective findings”. How 3D printers change the rules of manufacturing How 3D printers change the rules of manufacturing
Redesigning Reality: How 3-D Printing Is Shaping the Future of Art, Engineering, and Everything Else Redesigning Reality: How 3-D Printing Is Shaping the Future of Art, Engineering, and Everything Else Two interesting things happened this year. First, doctors in Belgium performed the country's first face transplant. Second, Asher Levine, a young avant-garde fashion designer for the likes of Lady Gaga, produced a pair of radical sunglasses on-site during his New York Fashion Week show. What do a surgical procedure and a line of shades have in common? Both were made possible by additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing or rapid prototyping, a technique whose quickly expanding accessibility may have as much of a revolutionary influence on how we relate to manufactured objects as Ford’s assembly line. It's a space-age sounding process: The same way a printer produces a document based on a computer file, additive manufacturing devices create made-to-order objects based on a CAD file.
Across Africa there is a vibrant culture of people creating things. Hardware products. It’s rarely glamorous as our inventors and micro-entrepreneurs innovate on products due to necessity — there simply aren’t enough jobs and they need to feed their families. Fabrication and manufacturing: The future of African hardware innovation Fabrication and manufacturing: The future of African hardware innovation
I’d like to sneak up on the question of 3-D printing by way of boring old 2-D printing. Typography used to be heavy industry. The companies that make typefaces are still called foundries because there was a time when letters were made of metal. Why 3-D Printing Isn't Like Virtual Reality 

Why 3-D Printing Will Go the Way of Virtual Reality

Update: Tim Maly has published an excellent counterpoint to this post over at the Tech Review Guest blog. There is a species of magical thinking practiced by geeks whose experience is computers and electronics—realms of infinite possibility that are purposely constrained from the messiness of the physical world—that is typical of Singularitarianism, mid-90s missives about the promise of virtual reality, and now, 3-D printing. As 3-D printers come within reach of the hobbyist—$1,100 for MakerBot’s Thing-O-Matic—and The Pirate Bay declares “physibles” the next frontier of piracy, I’m seeing usually level-headed thinkers like Clive Thompson and Tim Maly declare that the end of shipping is here and we should all start boning up on Cory Doctorow’s science fiction fantasies of a world in which any object can be rapidly synthesized with a little bit of energy and raw materials.
Disruptions: The 3-D Printing Free-For-All
About a year ago, I wrote a weekly post at Wired‘s Gadget Lab called “DIY Friday.” The first story was about MintyBoost, a USB charger made from AA batteries and an Altoids tin, devised by Adafruit’s Limor Fried. That was what DIY/maker hardware news mostly looked like in the last week of August 2010. Now, let’s look at the first week of August in 2011: Big DIY: The Year the Maker Movement Broke | Epicenter 
28 July 2011Last updated at 00:09 By Peter Day Presenter, In Business Loughborough University's machines can even print larger structures such as building materials With the creation of many products - including building materials - now possible at the touch of a button, will 3D printing sound the death knell for mass production? In a way there is nothing new about 3D printing. For several decades it has been called "rapid prototyping": a quick way of making one-off items from fused plastic or metal powder, using expensive computer-controlled lasers that are at the heart of the "printers". Will 3D printing revolutionise manufacturing?
Makers » Download for Free
"Makers", le roman qui prône la révolution par le bricolage
.MGX opens world's first store dedicated to 3D printed goods
Design And The New Industrial Revolution 
3-D printers will be your next home accessory - Jun. 6
Impresoras 3D: la próxima revolución digital
Consumer and Education: open source hardware
Fabulous Fab(Labs)
The Future of Manufacturing is Local
MakerBot Is a New 3-D Printer
Mark Suppes, l’homme qui fusionne des atomes dans son garage » Article