background preloader

Transcendence (religion)

Transcendence (religion)
In religion, transcendence refers to the aspect of a god's nature and power which is wholly independent of the material universe, beyond all physical laws. This is contrasted with immanence, where a god is said to be fully present in the physical world and thus accessible to creatures in various ways. In religious experience transcendence is a state of being that has overcome the limitations of physical existence and by some definitions has also become independent of it. This is typically manifested in prayer, séance, meditation, psychedelics and paranormal "visions". Although transcendence is defined as the opposite of immanence, the two are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Bahá'ís believe in a single, imperishable god, the creator of all things, including all the creatures and forces in the universe.[1] In the Bahá'í tradition, god is described as "a personal god, unknowable, inaccessible, the source of all Revelation, eternal, omniscient, omnipresent and almighty Thomas J. Related:  mental disorders in the middle ages: Christian Europe

Magic (paranormal) Magic most commonly refers to: Magic may also refer to: Aviation[edit] DTA Magic, a French ultralight trike wingEurodisplay SR-01 Magic, a Czech ultralight aircraft Computing[edit] Film and television[edit] Literature[edit] Music[edit] Albums[edit] Songs[edit] Nautical[edit] Radio[edit] Sorted by frequency, then by city: Canada[edit] CIMJ-FM (Majic 106.1), in Guelph, CanadaCJMJ-FM (Magic 100.3), in Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaCJMK-FM (Magic 98.3), in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaCJUK-FM (Magic 99.9), in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada United States[edit] Elsewhere[edit] Sports[edit] Magic Johnson (born 1959), American basketball player and businessmanOrlando Magic, a basketball teamWaikato Bay of Plenty Magic, a netball team Technology[edit] Other uses[edit] See also[edit]

Phenomenology (philosophy) Phenomenology (from Greek: phainómenon "that which appears" and lógos "study") is the philosophical study of the structures of experience and consciousness. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th century by Edmund Husserl and was later expanded upon by a circle of his followers at the universities of Göttingen and Munich in Germany. It then spread to France, the United States, and elsewhere, often in contexts far removed from Husserl's early work.[1] Phenomenology, in Husserl's conception, is primarily concerned with the systematic reflection on and study of the structures of consciousness and the phenomena that appear in acts of consciousness. Hicks writes, "In effect, the Structuralists were seeking subjective noumenal categories, and the Phenomenologists were content with describing the phenomena without asking what connection to an external reality those experiences might have

Humorism The four humors Humorism, or humoralism, is a now discredited theory of the makeup and workings of the human body, adopted by Ancient Greek and Roman physicians and philosophers, positing that an excess or deficiency of any of four distinct bodily fluids known as humors (UK: humours) in a person directly influences their temperament and health. From Hippocrates onward, the humoral theory was adopted by Greek, Roman and Persian physicians, and became the most commonly held view of the human body among European physicians until the advent of modern medical research in the nineteenth century. The four humors of Hippocratic medicine are black bile (Gk. melan chole), yellow bile (Gk. chole), phlegm (Gk. phlegma), and blood (Gk. haima), and each corresponds to one of the traditional four temperaments. A humor is also referred to as a cambium (pl. cambia or cambiums).[1] Four humors[edit] Paired qualities were associated with each humor and its season. History[edit] Origins[edit] Medicine[edit]

Phenomenology (philosophy) Phenomenology (from Greek: phainómenon "that which appears" and lógos "study") is the philosophical study of the structures of experience and consciousness. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th century by Edmund Husserl and was later expanded upon by a circle of his followers at the universities of Göttingen and Munich in Germany. It then spread to France, the United States, and elsewhere, often in contexts far removed from Husserl's early work.[1] Phenomenology, in Husserl's conception, is primarily concerned with the systematic reflection on and study of the structures of consciousness and the phenomena that appear in acts of consciousness. Hicks writes, "In effect, the Structuralists were seeking subjective noumenal categories, and the Phenomenologists were content with describing the phenomena without asking what connection to an external reality those experiences might have

Arnaldus de Villa Nova Arnaldus de Villa Nova (also called Arnau de Vilanova, Arnaldus Villanovanus, Arnaud de Ville-Neuve or Arnaldus de Villanueva, c. 1235–1313) was an alchemist, astrologer and physician. He is credited with translating a number of medical texts from Arabic, including works by Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Qusta ibn Luqa (Costa ben Luca), and Galen.[2] Many alchemical writings, including Thesaurus Thesaurorum or Rosarius Philosophorum, Novum Lumen, and Flos Florum, are also ascribed to him, but they are of very doubtful authenticity. Collected editions of them were published at Lyon in 1504 and 1532 (with a biography by Symphorianus Campegius), at Basel in 1585, at Frankfurt in 1603, and at Lyon in 1686. Villa Nova is credited with using a Camera Obscura to project live performances for entertainment.[3] [4] He is also the reputed author of various medical works, including Breviarium Practicae. Arnaldus de Villanova See also[edit] [edit] References[edit] See J. Further reading[edit] External links[edit]

Ontology Parmenides was among the first to propose an ontological characterization of the fundamental nature of reality. Etymology[edit] While the etymology is Greek, the oldest extant record of the word itself, the New Latin form ontologia, appeared in 1606 in the work Ogdoas Scholastica by Jacob Lorhard (Lorhardus) and in 1613 in the Lexicon philosophicum by Rudolf Göckel (Goclenius). The first occurrence in English of ontology as recorded by the OED (Oxford English Dictionary, online edition, 2008) came in a work by Gideon Harvey (1636/7–1702): Archelogia philosophica nova; or, New principles of Philosophy. Containing Philosophy in general, Metaphysicks or Ontology, Dynamilogy or a Discourse of Power, Religio Philosophi or Natural Theology, Physicks or Natural philosophy, London, Thomson, 1663.[5] The word was first used in its Latin form by philosophers based on the Latin roots, which themselves are based on the Greek. Overview[edit] Some fundamental questions[edit] Concepts[edit] Types[edit]

Devil The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος or diábolos = slanderer or accuser)[1] is believed in many religions, myths and cultures to be a supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The nature of the role varies greatly, ranging from being an effective opposite force to the creator god, locked in an eons long struggle for human souls on what may seem even terms (to the point of dualistic ditheism/bitheism), to being a comical figure of fun or an abstract aspect of the individual human condition. While mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel that tempts humans to sin, if not commit evil deeds himself. In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. Etymology Abrahamic religions Judaism Christianity Islam

Art of Noosphere Archetypes Art of Noosphere Archetypes The present section "Art of Noosphere Archetypes" is devoted to the demonstration of works and works of art which are connected with deep archetypes of our individual consciousness, collective unconsciousness, universal reason, superconsciousness. The authors of the submitted works have devoted long years to spiritual search and laborious research of ancient traditions, their judgement in connection with the life of the modern person and society. Having familiarized with the contents of the unit "Art of Noosphere Archetypes", you will receive not only aesthetic pleasure from the beautiful, but also will be able to work the problems connected with the individual unconsciousness of your soul, karmic problems of the past embodiments. Magic of Fractal Archetypes (Alexandr Kurilov) Archetypes of singing words (Dmitry Ryazanov) (in Russian)

Divinity Usages[edit] Divinity as a quality has two distinct usages: Divine force or power - powers or forces that are universal, or transcend human capacitiesDivinity applied to mortals - qualities of individuals who are considered to have some special access or relationship to the divine. There are three distinct usages of divinity and divine in religious discourse: Entity[edit] In monotheistic faiths, the word divinity is often used to refer to the singular God central to that faith. The terms divinity and divine — uncapitalized, and lacking the definite article — are sometimes used as to denote 'god(s)[4] or certain other beings and entities which fall short of godhood but lie outside the human realm. Divine force or power[edit] As previously noted, divinities are closely related to the transcendent force(s) or power(s) credited to them,[5] so much so that in some cases the powers or forces may themselves be invoked independently. Mortals[edit] Christianity[edit] Acts 17:29 Romans 1:20 2 Peter 1:3

Trepanning Trepanning, also known as trepanation, trephination, trephining or making a burr hole (the verb trepan derives via Old French and therefrom via Medieval Latin from the Greek noun of relevant meaning trypanon, literally "(a) borer, (an) auger")[1][2] is a surgical intervention in which a hole is drilled or scraped into the human skull, exposing the dura mater to treat health problems related to intracranial diseases. It may also refer to any "burr" hole created through other body surfaces, including nail beds. It is often used to relieve pressure beneath a surface. There is some contemporary use of the term. History[edit] Trepanated skull, Neolithic. Dr. 18th-century French illustration of trepanation. Prehistoric evidence[edit] Trepanation is perhaps the oldest surgical procedure for which there is archaeological evidence,[7] and in some areas may have been quite widespread. Pre-Colombian Mesoamerica[edit] Pre-modern Europe[edit] Pre-modern Central-East Asia[edit] Voluntary trepanation[edit]

Bloodletting Ancient Greek painting on a vase, showing a physician (iatros) bleeding a patient Bloodletting (or blood-letting) is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to cure or prevent illness and disease. Bloodletting was based on an ancient system of medicine in which blood and other bodily fluids were regarded as "humors" that had to remain in proper balance to maintain health. In the ancient world[edit] A chart showing the parts of the body to be bled for different diseases, c.1310-1320 "Bleeding" a patient to health was modeled on the process of menstruation. The Talmud recommended a specific day of the week and days of the month for bloodletting, and similar rules, though less codified, can be found among Christian writings advising which saints' days were favourable for bloodletting. Post 10th century[edit] Ioannis Sculteti, Armamentium Chirugiae, 1693 — Diagrammed transfusion of sheep's blood Scarificator, showing depth adjustment bar Diagram of scarificator, showing depth adjustment

Wikipedia entry on mental disorders in the middle ages: Christian Europe Flagellation In some circumstances the word "flogging" is used loosely to include any sort of corporal punishment, including birching and caning. However, in British legal terminology, a distinction was drawn (and still is, in one or two colonial territories) between "flogging" (with a cat-o'-nine-tails) and "whipping" (formerly with a whip, but since the early 19th century with a birch). In Britain these were both abolished in 1948. Disciplinary use and torture[edit] Prisoners at a whipping post in a Delaware prison, circa 1907. Antiquity[edit] In Sparta, young men were flogged as a test of their masculinity. In the Roman Empire, flagellation was often used as a prelude to crucifixion, and in this context is sometimes referred to as scourging. The Romans reserved this treatment for non-citizens, as stated in the lex Porcia and lex Sempronia, dating from 195 and 123 BCE. From Middle Ages to modern times[edit] Whipping was used during the French Revolution. Punishment with a Great Knout. Judaism[edit]

Exorcism Exorcism (from Greek ἐξορκισμός, exorkismos - binding by oath) is the practice of evicting demons or other spiritual entities from a person or an area they are believed to have possessed.[1] Depending on the spiritual beliefs of the exorcist, this may be done by causing the entity to swear an oath, performing an elaborate ritual, or simply by commanding it to depart in the name of a higher power. The practice is ancient and part of the belief system of many cultures and religions. Requested and performed exorcisms had begun to decline in the United States by the 18th century and occurred rarely until the latter half of the 20th century when the public saw a sharp rise due to the media attention exorcisms were getting. There was “a 50% increase in the number of exorcisms performed between the early 1960s and the mid-1970s”.[2] Christianity[edit] In Catholic practice the person performing the exorcism, known as an exorcist, is a consecrated priest. Hinduism[edit] Islam[edit] Judaism[edit]

Related: