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New Study Links Social Anxiety To Being An Empath

New Study Links Social Anxiety To Being An Empath
Written by Amateo Ra| Have you ever felt anxious being around other people? For some, the feelings of social anxiety can be so intense that someone can feel totally paralyzed just to be out in public. Could social anxiety’s hidden link to empathy give us a greater understanding into the lives of those affected? Social anxiety can often be an extremely confusing, challenging and even interesting experience for many. Fear is the primary feeling generally attributed to social anxiety, and those who experience it often can’t seem to discover the origin of the social anxiety within themselves. All logic can seem to fail in the face of social anxiety. A new Scientific Study recently released published on PubMed shows that people with social phobias and anxieties are hypersensitive to other peoples states of mind. This helps shed major light on the subject, finding a hidden link between social anxiety and being an Empath. So in all, if you are an Empath with Social Anxiety, you’re not crazy!

http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/new-study-links-social-anxiety-to-being-empath/

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