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Programming Sucks

Programming Sucks
Every friend I have with a job that involves picking up something heavier than a laptop more than twice a week eventually finds a way to slip something like this into conversation: "Bro, you don't work hard. I just worked a 4700-hour week digging a tunnel under Mordor with a screwdriver." They have a point. Mordor sucks, and it's certainly more physically taxing to dig a tunnel than poke at a keyboard unless you're an ant. But, for the sake of the argument, can we agree that stress and insanity are bad things? Awesome. All programming teams are constructed by and of crazy people Imagine joining an engineering team. Would you drive across this bridge? All code is bad Every programmer occasionally, when nobody's home, turns off the lights, pours a glass of scotch, puts on some light German electronica, and opens up a file on their computer. This file is Good Code. Every programmer starts out writing some perfect little snowflake like this. There will always be darkness "Double you tee eff?"

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AntiPattern bad things · writing tags: Andrew Koenig first coined the term "antipattern" in an article in JOOP[1], which is sadly not available on the internet. The essential idea (as I remember it [2]) was that an antipattern was something that seems like a good idea when you begin, but leads you into trouble. Since then the term has often been used just to indicate any bad idea, but I think the original focus is more useful. In the paper Koenig said Video of the Day: Aurora Borealis Over Ferries Posted by Sarah Lane on September 14, 2015 at 12:45 pm The night of September 9 we had a rare aurora borealis in Puget Sound skies. Meg McDonald of Wild Northwest Beauty Photography captured a time lapse video of the phenomenon, more commonly known as the Northern Lights, complete with ferry and airplane crossings. Although the aurora borealis is usually seen farther north, we get them too when the auroral oval is briefly enlarged by a geomagnetic storm. Auroras are created when solar wind disturbs the paths of charged particles in the magnetosphere, pushing the particles into the exosphere where their energy is lost and light is emitted in the process. Video courtesy of Wild Northwest Beauty Photography.

The Iceberg Secret, Revealed by Joel Spolsky Wednesday, February 13, 2002 "I don't know what's wrong with my development team," the CEO thinks to himself. "Things were going so well when we started this project. For the first couple of weeks, the team cranked like crazy and got a great prototype working. But since then, things seem to have slowed to a crawl. How to link with the correct C Run-Time (CRT) library This article was previously published under Q140584 There are six types of reusable libraries: Static Single Threaded Library (Debug/Release)Static Multithreaded Library (Debug/Release)Dynamic Link Library (DLL)(Debug/Release)Note Each library has a debug version and a release version. The DLL is multithread-safe and a single-thread version of the CRT library is not provided for DLLs. If the reusable library or any user of the library is using multiple threads, then the library needs to be a multithread-safe library type. Note Debug libraries and compiler switches /MLd, /MTd, and /MDd are only available in Visual C++ versions 4.0 and later.

users.ece.utexas.edu/~adnan/pike.html Rob Pike's 5 Rules of Programming Rule 1. You can't tell where a program is going to spend its time. Bottlenecks occur in surprising places, so don't try to second guess and put in a speed hack until you've proven that's where the bottleneck is. Rule 2. Measure. Blog » Linode Nextgen: The Network March 7, 2013 1:24 pm This is the first of a series of blog posts about an effort we’re calling Linode: NextGen. In the coming days, we’ll tell you about other improvements and changes, but today we want to let you know about network upgrades. The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor’s Home When I broke into my neighbor’s home earlier this week, I didn’t use any cat burglar skills. I don’t know how to pick locks. I’m not even sure how to use a crowbar. It turns out all anyone needs to invade a friend’s apartment is an off switch for their conscience and an iPhone.

IDA: About What is IDA all about? IDA is a Windows, Linux or Mac OS X hosted multi-processor disassembler and debugger that offers so many features it is hard to describe them all. Just grab an evaluation version if you want a test drive. An executive summary is provided for the non-technical user. From Switch Statement Down to Machine Code - Ranting @ 741 MHz Introduction Most of us know what a switch statement is and have probably been using it very often. No wonder why — switch statement is simple yet extremely expressive. It allows keeping the code compact while describing complex control flow. Putting the syntactic sugar aside, most developers also believe that using a switch statement results in a lot better, faster code. Meet the Robots Shipping Your Amazon Orders Across the country, laborers are hard at work lifting 700-pound shelves full of multivolume encyclopedias, propane grills or garden gnomes and dragging them across vast warehouse floors. Carefully trained not to bump into one another, the squat workers are 320 pounds and a mere 16 inches tall. No, they’re not Christmas elves—they’re some of the most advanced robots that e-commerce giant Amazon now uses to ship its goods. In an exclusive video for TIME, photographer and videographer Stephen Wilkes captured these Amazon robots in action at the company’s Tracy, Calif., warehouse. The robots are made by Kiva Systems, a company Amazon purchased for $775 million in 2012 to better handle the hundreds of worldwide orders Amazon customers make every second. Kiva’s robots bring shelves of goods out of storage and carry them to employees, allowing Amazon to retrieve more items for more customers simultaneously.

The Internet map The map of the Internet Like any other map, The Internet map is a scheme displaying objects’ relative position; but unlike real maps (e.g. the map of the Earth) or virtual maps (e.g. the map of Mordor), the objects shown on it are not aligned on a surface. Mathematically speaking, The Internet map is a bi-dimensional presentation of links between websites on the Internet. Every site is a circle on the map, and its size is determined by website traffic, the larger the amount of traffic, the bigger the circle. Users’ switching between websites forms links, and the stronger the link, the closer the websites tend to arrange themselves to each other.

Forking Workflow The array of possible workflows can make it hard to know where to begin when implementing Git in the workplace. This page provides a starting point by surveying the most common Git workflows for enterprise teams. As you read through, remember that these workflows are designed to be guidelines rather than concrete rules. We want to show you what’s possible, so you can mix and match aspects from different workflows to suit your individual needs. Centralized Workflow Transitioning to a distributed version control system may seem like a daunting task, but you don’t have to change your existing workflow to take advantage of Git.

Feedback mechanisms and tradeoffs Rapid feedback is one of the cornerstones of agile development. The faster we can get feedback, the less it costs to correct errors. Unit testing is one of the ways to get feedback, but not the only one. Each way we can get feedback comes with its own advantages and disadvantages.

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