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Who Wants to Know? Use Student Questions to Drive Learning

Who Wants to Know? Use Student Questions to Drive Learning
Martin Luther King, Jr. considered this to be life's most persistent and urgent question: "What are you doing for others?" As we approach the holiday that honors his legacy, here's another question worth pondering: How many of your students know how to ask persistent and urgent questions of their own? Knowing how to formulate a good question -- and having the courage to ask it -- is a skill with profound social justice implications. Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana, founders of the Right Question Institute, first became interested in questioning techniques when they were working with parents in a low-income community. Parents told them they didn't participate in their children's education because they didn't know what to ask. That was more than 20 years ago. In their important and accessible book, Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions, the co-authors outline a simple but powerful approach to put classroom questions where they belong: with students.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/who-wants-know-use-student-questions-drive-learning-suzie-boss

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8 ways teachers can talk less and get kids talking more If you do fewer teacher-directed activities, that means the kids will naturally do more talking, doesn’t it? Not necessarily. I have often found myself talking almost constantly during group work and student-directed projects because I’m trying to push kids’ thinking, provide feedback, and help them stay on task. Crafting Questions That Drive Projects Which comes first, the driving question or the learning goals? I think it depends. The most successful projects feed off of students’ passions. Don’t be afraid to tap into them. Take what they are interested in and find a way to connect that interest to learning standards. In my first year of teaching, my fifth graders were obsessed with SpongeBob Squarepants.

The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking The Question Game by Sophie Wrobel, geist.avesophos.de The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking Big idea: Teaching kids to ask smart questions on their own Churchill’s 5 Elements for Persuasive Speaking Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, famed British Prime Minister during World War II, was not only a noted statesman, but also a gifted student of oration and history. Churchill wrote numerous pieces on history, the English language, and how to develop the skills necessary to develop a mastery of rhetoric. So gifted was Churchill that he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953: “…for his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values.”

38 Question Starters based on Bloom’s Taxonomy - Curriculet Curriculet is free for teachers and students. Get started here. This is the 2nd post in a series on how to write better curriculets (and literacy curriculum). Our first post can be found here. In this blog post, Lindsey Howe shares some of the best practices she has developed as a teacher and curriculet writer. Lindsey is one of Curriculet’s first writers and she has taught high school English for 8 years. Home Play - Managing Your Project For this week’s Hangout, we were joined by Matt Baer, Dean of Students at Riley Street Middle School in Hudsonville, Michigan, Alicia Peletz, Instructional Coach at Rochester Career Mentoring Charter School, a high school in New York, and Katrina Martinez, Director of the K-8 Legacy Preparatory Charter Academy in Dallas, Texas. We focused on the following Driving Question: “How can you manage the day-to-day work of students and teams during a project?” Here were some of the highlights: Question 1: How do you prepare students for PBL? Our guests talked about building a culture that supports PBL.

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions 8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions by Terry Heick Questions can be extraordinary learning tools. A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so. Easing the Pain of Student Collaboration One of the most valued skills employers are looking for in an employee is the ability to collaborate. This doesn’t just mean being “nice,” it means being able to be part of a productive and efficient team that gets the job done. And while a significant amount of adult time is devoted to teaching very young kids the basics of playing well with others, as students enter into middle and high school, little attention is given to developing a student’s ability to collaborate. At the same time, every teacher has experienced the pain that comes with student collaboration. Get started with these sample contracts from New Tech Network, and watch the video below to learn more about team contracts. Grades 9-12 / All Subjects / Pbl

Questioning - Top Ten Strategies “Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein Questioning is the very cornerstone of philosophy and education, ever since Socrates ( in our Western tradition) decided to annoy pretty much everyone by critiquing and harrying people with questions – it has been central to our development of thinking and our capacity to learn. Indeed, it is so integral to all that we do that it is often overlooked when developing pedagogy – but it as crucial to teaching as air is to breathing. We must ask: do we need to give questioning the thought and planning time something so essential to learning obviously deserves? Do we need to consciously teach students to ask good questions and not just answer them?

Home-Play - Five Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning Voiceover: How will today’s children function in a dangerous world? What means will they use to carve the future? Will they be equipped to find the answers to tomorrow’s problems? 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute.

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