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Robert Reich: America is headed full speed back to the 19th century

Robert Reich: America is headed full speed back to the 19th century

http://www.salon.com/topic/2015

Related:  New Economic system/trends and new paradigmsMisc.FABBINGMore of the 'A's to 'Z'rs'HISTORY

Where machines could replace humans The technical potential for automation differs dramatically across sectors and activities. As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines? In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail. George Takei on How Kim Davis Violated the First Amendment How one enterprising Iranian expat family and its allies successfully pushed for U.S.-Iran rapprochement—and now stands to make a fortune from sanctions relief. When the world’s major powers struck a deal over Iran’s nuclear program in Vienna in July, it represented a victory not just for the Islamic Republic, which has now been granted international legitimacy as a nuclear threshold state, but also for a small but increasingly influential lobby in America, one which has long sought rapprochement between Washington and Tehran and now seeks to leverage a successfully concluded nuclear deal as a means to that end. This Iran lobby, publicly represented by the National Iranian American Council (NIAC), has become a staunch institutional ally of the White House selling the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, as the nuclear deal is known. Little known to the American press, the Namazis have rarely acted as spokespersons for their own cause. But the political winds were shifting.

resilience.io – Supported by The Ecological Sequestration Trust resilience.io is an open-source, cloud-based regional platform, which gathers satellite/earth observation, open government and crowd-sourced economic, social and environmental data together in one place, in an understandable, palatable and visual format. Backed by an advanced systems model1, resilience.io integrates human-ecological-economic systems2 and calculates the current resource flows from economic, human and ecological activity and the impact on human well-being. With this base, it can be used to visualise and predict the outcome of different scenarios which results in better planning and decision-making for a achieving transformation to a more resilient city-region. Importantly, resilience.io enables economically beneficial resource management to be funded through new direct investment into a wide variety of projects, which use and contribute to the data in the platform. It also insures against extreme risks, especially in energy, water and food security. Want to know more?

More Lies From Spies: the Tall Tales of Robert Gates “A leader, or those who aspire to that role, regardless of whether in the public or the private sector, must have integrity.”— Robert M. Gates, 2016. Former CIA director and secretary of defense Robert M. Gates, who served both Bush administrations as well as the Obama administration, has produced his third self-aggrandizing memoir. His most recent effort, “A Passion for Leadership,” is in the form of lessons learned, but there is no acknowledgement of any flaw or stumble, let alone mistake. In view of Gates’ emphasis on “integrity,” it’s useful to review his CIA career, particularly his relationship with CIA director William Casey. Brain training doesn’t make you smarter If you’ve spent more than about 5 minutes surfing the web, listening to the radio, or watching TV in the past few years, you will know that cognitive training—better known as “brain training”—is one of the hottest new trends in self improvement. Lumosity, which offers web-based tasks designed to improve cognitive abilities such as memory and attention, boasts 50 million subscribers and advertises on National Public Radio. Cogmed claims to be “a computer-based solution for attention problems caused by poor working memory,” and BrainHQ will help you “make the most of your unique brain.” The promise of all of these products, implied or explicit, is that brain training can make you smarter—and make your life better. Yet, according to a statement released by the Stanford University Center on Longevity and the Berlin Max Planck Institute for Human Development, there is no solid scientific evidence to back up this promise. The results were striking.

Joseph Stiglitz proposes co-op models as an alternative to trickle-down economics - Co-operative News A changing political landscape and economic challenges mean we are witnessing “interesting” but “unsettling” times, warned economist Joseph Stiglitz at the International Summit of Cooperatives in Quebec. The Nobel Prize laureate was a keynote speaker at the three-day conference, which brings together over 3,000 delegates from across the world to discuss the future of the co-operative economy. A world-renowned academic, Prof Stiglitz teaches at Columbia University and has written extensively about inequality, trade agreements and the main issues affecting the world economy. At the Summit he looked at the key challenges facing the global economy and the role of co-ops in addressing them. He said that alongside changes in the political landscape, such as Brexit and the upcoming elections in the USA, the world faced economic issues which are beyond the control of individuals and even national governments.

Atheist's View On Life Could Make Anyone Cry. 4 Minutes In, The Interviewer Almost Gets Choked Up. Terry Gross: I think having friends who die, getting older, getting closer toward the end of a life tests people's faith, and it also tests people's atheism. It sounds like your atheism is staying strong. Maurice Sendak: It's what? Zaha Hadid, Groundbreaking Architect, Dies at 65 Then, in 1972, she arrived at the Architectural Association in London, a center for experimental design. Her teachers included Elia Zenghelis and Rem Koolhaas. They “ignited my ambition,” she would recall, and “taught me to trust even my strangest intuitions.” Photo Ms. Hadid’s intuitions led her, among other directions, toward the Russian avant-garde, and its leaders: Vladimir Tatlin, El Lissitzky and Kazimir Malevich.

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