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Independent Reading: 101

Independent Reading: 101
What is Independent Reading, Really? Independent reading is any time carved out of your day in which your students are reading self-selected books that are a "good fit" for them. There are different kinds of reading that may be going on in your room during this time and it will look different from classroom to classroom.The focus of this time is to support, encourage and validate your students as they grow as readers, through all of their ages and stages. The main components of independent reading are outlined below. When do I find the Time? Independent Reading is an indispensable part of the day in a literacy rich classroom. More Formal/ Larger Chunks of Independent Reading Time Informal (yet super powerful) Reading Times Getting Started: The Nuts & Bolts On Keeping Reading Logs For what purpose? On Use of Reading Levels Watch Donalyn Miller's Keynote via The Educator Collaborative, LLC Sharing my thoughts...

https://www.smore.com/bhw9c-independent-reading-101

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All About Balanced Literacy Shared Reading is a link in helping students become independent readers. It allows the teacher to model and support students using prediction and confirming skills. It allows less confident students the chance to share stories/articles/poetry in a non­threatening situation. It focuses on the meaning, fun, enjoyment, characters and sequence of a story and allows them to relate it back to their own experiences.

Teaching With a Mountain View: Anchor Chart Tips & Tricks It's no secret that I have a "thing" for anchor charts. My readers know it, my students know it, my colleagues know it, my husband knows it... I can't help it--they have changed my classroom! They have made my walls interactive instead of stagnant. I just LOVE anchor charts. I remember seeing anchor charts begin to pop up on Pinterest and looking at mine in shame.

Repurposing March Madness Every March, millions of people come down with a very strange illness…Bracket Fever. I know people who haven’t seen a college basketball game in 10 years who still religiously fill out a bracket and sweat out the scores and results. It has become larger than just a basketball tournament; it has become a cultural phenomenon. So what is it that is so engaging about participating in this science of “bracketology” and how can we repurpose it for our classrooms?

Word Study Instruction in the K-2 Classroom Word study is an approach to spelling instruction that moves away from a focus on memorization. The approach reflects what researchers have discovered about the alphabetic, pattern, and meaning layers of English orthography. Teachers use a variety of hands-on activities, often called word work, to help students actively explore these layers of information. When studying the alphabetic layer, students examine the relationship between letters and sounds. They learn to match single letters and pairs of letters (e.g., ch) to specific sounds and, in doing so, to create words.

Interactive Read Aloud: How To Do It and Why It Works Every teacher should know how to do an interactive read aloud. Here is why it works and how to do it. When you consider a framework for best literacy methods within a classroom, daily read alouds from a variety of genres should be a foundational teaching practice. There are a variety of purposes for reading books out loud. Sometimes it is simply for pleasure, and that is an experience many students never received. Other purposes can include: A Differentiated Kindergarten: Math Stations Tips (and a Freebie) Linky Party Math Stations! So fun and, yet somehow, so hard to wrap your head around. . . When I first started contemplating math stations, it was shortly after reading Debbie Diller’s fabulous Math Work Stations. (You should really check it out HERE if you haven't read it.)

25 Anchor Charts for Teaching Writing Anchor charts are a great way to make thinking visible as you record strategies, processes, cues, guidelines and other content during the learning process. Here are 25 of our favorite charts for teaching your students all about writing. The Why Behind Writers Workshops Source: The First Grade Parade First and second graders will draw inspiration from this fun-filled anchor chart about why we write. Make this chart applicable to older students by expanding on each aspect with a specific audience or goal. "To share experiences" can become "to share experiences with friends, in a postcard or with readers in a memoir." Setting Goals Source: second-grade writing-goals chart sets goals around important writing skills for younger students: punctuation, and vocabulary.

Word Study Routine and Tips~Words their Way Recently, I have received lots of interest in my Words Their Way Word Searches and questions about my word study routine. If you are unfamiliar with Words Their Way, check out the foundational text by the same name. To see an example of the developmental spelling inventory, check out this tutorial from Pearsontraining. In the past few years, I have tried different things, but worked to simplify the process of having too many groups, word lists, and activities for students to complete. I have also worked to find routine activities that remind students of the purpose of word study~that the spelling learning should transfer into our actual writing! I have found that students' spelling deteriorates when word study is dropped from the classroom (maybe students think you don't think spelling is important at that point?)

Normal Child Development in First Grade When it comes to children's behavior, it can be hard to know what is part of normal child development, and what you should be truly concerned about. Brian, normally a free thinker, has started crumpling up his drawings if they are not exactly perfect, saying with frustration, "It's not right!" Easygoing Tatiana has a crying fit when dad wins at a game of Chutes and Ladders. When 6 year old Gabe accidentally knocks a box of crayons to the floor and sees you looking, he yells, "It wasn't me!" Should you be concerned? Is this normal?

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