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Frenchfrog's Little English Pond

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Freedom Writers: Anne Frank A. Work with a partner. Choose the correct answer. Make guesses. The pair of students who score most points is the winner! 1. Conquering Cliques in School By Cindy Long Walk into the cafeteria at Vista High School in San Diego, and you’ll likely need a field guide—or at least a student like junior Karen Ceballos—to identify all the different student cliques clustered around lunchroom tables. “There are the anime lovers, the hip hop dancers, the gamers, the metal rockers, the skaters, the surfers, the honors kids, the drama kids, the emos, and many more,” says Ceballos. “A lot of the cliques are even further divided into sub-cliques, like the band geeks and the band hipsters, or the jocks whose cliques revolve around certain sports, like football, track, swim, baseball, or water polo.”

Find Free Images Quickly With Compfight Creative Commons licensed photos are a sort of internet miracle: By providing an easily-understood syntax for attribution and permissions, they make it possible to add visual interest to blog posts, web sites, syllabuses, presentations–anything you like, really. They also facilitate remixes and other forms of creative adaptation (or deformation), which can be useful in a wide variety of teaching and research contexts. We’ve written about Flickr & Creative Commons before: I explained how to do creative-commons limited searches, and Julie suggested integrating creative commons-licensed material in your classroom. I also reviewed Wylio, a website that searches Flickr. (Wylio has since adopted a different business model.) Beyond photos, George has detailed how to find free, re-usable content for your classroom.

Mind Map: Prepositions of time (at/ on/ in) Prepositions of time (at/in/on) can be confusing for English learners. To find out the differences, read the post: We use: AT for the time of the day: • At five o’clock • At 11.45 • At midnight • At lunchtime • At sunset We use: ON for days and dates • On Friday/ on Fridays • On 16 May 2013 • On Christmas Day • On my birthday We use: IN for longer periods (for example: months/years/seasons) • In June • In 2015 • In (the) winter • In the 19th century • In the past • In the future • In the Renaissance Locker Decorations Growing in Popularity in Middle Schools But you can’t go in because the door doesn’t lead to a room. It leads to a locker. Specifically, Nola Storey’s locker at Rye Middle School in a New York suburb. “I’ve had a bunch of people stop by my locker and say, ‘Wow, your locker’s so cool,’ ” Nola, 11, said. Her mother, Kelly Jines-Storey, said the Lilliputian furnishings initially struck her as “kind of crazy.” But she added, “My second thought was, ‘Wow, I wish I would’ve thought of that.’ ”

Get to Know Your New Students Through Comics As every teacher knows, it can take a while for new students to open up to each other and to you. One way to get them to share stories about themselves is to have them put it into a fun comic story. Through creating comic stories you can have students share favorite stories from their summer vacations. In the process students learn how to use a new tool, practice developing storylines, and they let you in on a little bit of who they are as people. Here are a few web-based tools that your students can use to create comic stories to share with you. Comic Master is a free tool designed for students to use to create comics in the "graphic novel style" that is popular with a lot of kids in the ten to fourteen years old age range.

Twitter as a tool for learningScoop Social media often gets a bad rap for being a driving force behind people falling out of touch, neglecting in-person relationships, and reducing productivity for people around the world. Naysayers blame it for shorter attention spans and proliferation of bad grammar, and the most vehement of those naysayers believe that social media has led to privacy being a thing of the past. To be fair, there have been many times where I’ve been trolling my Twitter feed only to be thoroughly horrified by TMI moments and tHingz Speld lIKE THIZ. But if you look past the rough surface Twitter can sometimes present, you find an amazing tool for learning.

British Slang If you’re planning on visiting London in the future, you might just want to familiarise yourself with some British Slang expressions that are very commonly used by the British. They will be very useful particularly if you’re likely to be socialising with Londoners. 1. “Mind The Gap” This famous expression is always used on trains and the London Underground (Tube).

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