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TVPaint Developpement - Web Site

TVPaint Developpement - Web Site
Developed in France, TVPaint Animation is the leading paperless drawing and animation tool, able to imitate traditional techniques such as Pen Brush, Gouache, Watercolour, Pencil, Felt-tip and Airbrush, and animate them over frames. Using only TVPaint Animation, you can create an animated movie from start to finish, including storyboarding and all the steps (rough, clean-up, keyframes and in-betweening) through to final compositing. Explore our website to learn more about TVPaint Animation and its renowned forefathers (TVPaint, Aura, Mirage...). You can also check out the amazing artwork in our Gallery, talk with us and other TVPaint Animation users on the Forum, and download the Trial Version.

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The Pixar Theory Every Pixar movie is connected. I explain how, and possibly why. Several months ago, I watched a fun-filled video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe. Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call “The Pixar Theory,” a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme. This theory covers every Pixar production since Toy Story. Short interactive film: 3 Dreams of Black by Chris Milk A new interactive music video for the concept album Rome—a collaboration between Danger Mouse and composer Daniele Luppi inspired by the music from old spaghetti westerns. An HTML5 project for use in Google Chrome Director Chris Milk follows the success of The Wilderness Downtown with a new interactive music video for the concept album Rome—a collaboration between Danger Mouse and composer Daniele Luppi inspired by the music from old spaghetti westerns. The video is broken into three different dreams. The first, a first-person dreamy video (similar to Milk’s Last Day Dream)—the second, a ride through an ever-shifting landscape—and the final dream, a soaring flight through sky structures.

Marc Scheff » The Truth About Art(Part 1, it just takes time) Quarterly Newsletter The Truth About Art(Part 1, it just takes time) 19 Comments About Animate It! Stick your webcam down with a bit of Blu-tack or Sellotape so you don’t knock it over while shooting. Any webcam will do the job, ideally you want one with a manual focus. We recommend the HP HD-5210 webcam. Buy it! Setting up a scene for your character couldn't be easier. Grab a few objects from around the house and arrange them nicely to create your character’s world.

James Carlisle: Armature upgrade Back to uni and starting third year with a mime/after effects project. Started by upgrading my summer armature from hard foam to balsa wood. Just to make sure it would survive the animation process. I also made about three pairs of spare hands just incase fingers/wrists broke In the past, there were separate briefs to do a mime, lip sync, and after effects project that don't link to each other at all. But this year they've all been thrown into one.

Morph Animation Competition! We’ve had lots of fun bringing Morph back to screens and giving the classic clips a bit of a polish. And it looks like you’ve really enjoyed watching them, which has made us very happy indeed! We’ve also loved hearing that watching Morph has inspired lots of fans to learn about the art of stop-motion animation and have a go at making their own animated adventures. So, we’ve devised a little creative challenge for you, with a fantastic, truly unique prize up for grabs! We want YOU to step into the role of animator and director and wow us with a new Morph adventure!

"Will O' The Wisp" Production Bumper + Short Film (2014) - StopMotionAnimation.com Hello Everyone :) I've been posting some random W.I.P. photos and little test videos over the past year or so, but I recently discovered there's a "your project" section here in the forum. So this is a thread for my ongoing project, "Will O' The Wisp". Hope you enjoy. How the Puppets from Fantastic Mr. Fox Were Made [Slide Show] With Haymoz’s drawings as a reference, the Mancunian puppet makers went to work. Sculptors began by fleshing out the designs into three dimensions using plastiline clay. The main animal puppets—the ones used for close-ups—were approximately 12 inches tall, and the human characters were slightly smaller; since they don’t share much screen time, the difference in scale wasn’t a problem. After the plastiline figure was approved by Wes—who directed this film remotely from his Paris apartment; Haymoz says that when he finally did visit the studio, it was like seeing Santa Claus—the sculptors removed a layer of clay equal to the thickness of the fur that was going to be applied to that particular area. Says Saunders, “It was kind of half science, half art, how you shrunk the character down so that when you added the hair to it, it would go back to the original volume.” The fur on the animals’ limbs and heads was applied to a latex backing that was stretched over the puppet.

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