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Cyber's Cheep CD-Spindle Grow Tek

Cyber's Cheep CD-Spindle Grow Tek
I orginally did this for fun, It makes a nice simple little grow that is easily hidden. You will need a 1 pint colonized grain jar to make this work. Things you will need 100 CDR spindle, I think everyone that has a CD burner has a few of these laying around! Duck Tape and Knife Spray bottle of distilled water Spray bottle of alcohol Sterile spoon plastic wrap Vermiculite 1/4 cup measuring cup a bowl and a colonized pint of WBS OK Lets start. Next you want to use the ducktape and cover 3" of the bottom of the spindle This works out to be a layer starting at the bottom with a second layer 1/2 over the first. (2" wide ducktape) Don't forget to cover the bottom of the spindle we do not want any light getting in! Take the bottle of alcohol and spray and clean the inside of the spindle. I am using a dental spoon which has been sterilized on an autoclave bag. Mix them in a bowl. Some people will microwave or pasteurize the vermiculite. Now add your vermiculite to bring it up to the tape line. Related:  Mush Room

Rainy season brings glow-in-the-dark mushrooms 24 May 2006 With the arrival of Japan's rainy season, a mysterious type of green, glow-in-the-dark mushroom begins to sprout in Wakayama prefecture. The Mycena lux-coeli mushrooms, known locally as shii no tomobishi-dake (literally, "chinquapin glow mushrooms"), sprout from fallen chinquapin trees. As they grow, a chemical reaction involving luciferin (a light-emitting pigment contained within the mushrooms) occurs, causing them to glow a ghostly green. The luminescent mushrooms were long believed to be indigenous solely to Tokyo's Hachijojima Island after they were discovered there in the early 1950s. The mushrooms thrive in humid environments, popping up during Japan's rainy season, which typically lasts from the end of May to July. [Source: Mainichi Shimbun]

Rare ‘Devil’s Cigar’ fungus discovered in Nara One of the world's rarest fungi, an exotic star-shaped mushroom known to exist at only three locations on Earth, has been discovered in the mountains of Nara prefecture. The Devil's Cigar (a.k.a. "Texas Star") -- known to botanists as Chorioactis geaster -- had been observed only in central Texas and at two remote locations in Japan prior to the recent discovery in Nara. The peculiar fungus is described as a dark brown cigar-shaped capsule that transforms into a tan-colored star when it splits open to release its spores. It is also one of only a few known fungi that produce an audible hiss when releasing spores. First reported in 1893 in Austin, Texas, the curious mushroom appears in a limited area of central Texas each year, and until now, the rare sightings in Japan have occurred in forests in Miyazaki and Kochi prefectures. The recent Nara discovery was made by Masakuni Kimura, curator of a natural history museum in the town of Kawakami (Nara prefecture).

Mushrooms, Fungi, Mycology FungiPhoto.com Mushroom Photo Catalog Which species can be found growing where and when? Panaeolus cinctulus (aka P. subalteatus) This mushroom is listed first because it is the most common and widely distributed psilocybin mushroom. Found from spring to autumn alone or clustered in lawns, strawpiles, all types of compost, and dung piles in all 50 states and every country in the world. They grow in large numbers on the manure compost piles that are nearby any stable, race track or place where horses are kept. Psilocybe cubensis Found from February to November growing directly from on cow or horse dung, in rich pasture soil, on straw, or on sawdust/dung mixture in Mexico, Cuba, Florida and most other other southern US states and tropical countries. Panaeolus cyanescens Found in early summer through late autumn scattered, grouped, or clustered on cow dung, or rich soil in tropical areas such as Mexico and Hawaii as well as Florida and other southern states. Psilocybe cyanescens Psilocybe ovoideocystidiata Common in the Ohio River Valley from April 15 to June 15. Psilocybe mexicana

Psilocybe Mushrooms Psilocybe Mushrooms These images appear in the book Psilocybin Mushrooms of the World by Paul Stamets. They are for informational purposes only and should not be used alone for identification. All photographs are copyrighted by Paul Stamets, all rights reserved, not for re-distribution without written permission. Psilocybe azurescens Common Names "Astoriensis" "Flying Saucer Mushroom" "Indigo Psilocybe"Blue Runners" "Blue Angels" Habitat This mushroom naturally grows, often prolifically, along the northern Oregon Coast near Astoria, Oregon, favoring the beachland interface. Psilocybe baeocystis Common Names "Baeos" "Knobby Tops" Habitat Found on decaying conifer mulch, in wood chips, or in lawns with high lignin content. Psilocybe cubensis "Golden Tops" "Cubies" "San Isidros" "Hongos Kentesh" Psilocybe cyanescens "Cyans" "Blue Halos" "Wavy-Capped Psilocybe" Psilocybe cyanofbrillosa "Rhododenron Psilocybe" "Blue-Haired Psilocybe" Psilocybe pelliculosa Psilocybe semilanceata Psilocybe sylvatica

Psilocybe Cyanescens One of my new discoveries of the magic our world has to offer is this new friend of mine "Psilocybe Cyanescens" (cyan-type of blue, escens- essence) who's spirit I found in the high peaking parks of San Francisco. Or like others say "the mushroom founds you". Luckily a mushroom guru friend of mine had given me a tour and explained me all the safe basics needed to know in hunting, finding and harvesting a REAL Psilocybe Cyanescens mushroom fresh from San Francisco! My new love and hobby is to go on daily mushroom hunts and to revisit my gardens to pick more mushrooms every couple days. Further I am obsessed of learning more upon all the different kinds we find in California and also recipes and the purest extractions for scientific research. I went for three days this week on a 1-4 hour hike to several different parks and found on average anywhere from 1/4 to 2 ounces of fresh mushrooms. Here are some necessary tips if you are looking to find some magic mushrooms in your environment:

Neuroscientists Probe Psychedelic Psilocybin In the 1950s scientists studied the effects of so-called psychedelics: psilocybin from mushrooms, mescaline from cacti and the synthetic lysergic acid diethylamide, or LSD. British psychiatrist Humphry Osmond coined the name for this class of drugs based on their mind-altering properties, such as changes in the sense of self. The drugs showed some initial promise in treating chronic pain and depression in terminally ill patients but a wave of recreational abuse in the late 1960s led to outlawing and a halt in research. Now a new, rigorous, double-blind study has reopened the doors of scientific investigation, reporting spiritual effects and long-term impacts from the use of psilocybin. Neuroscientist Roland Griffiths of Johns Hopkins University and his colleagues tested the effects of psilocybin--a drug derived from certain mushrooms that appears to mimic the effects of serotonin in the brain--on 36 middle-aged Americans who had never tried psychedelics before.

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