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Day 5 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of time

Day 5 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of time
Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fifth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m nearly half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue with an old classic, by looking at prepositions of time… The prepositions at, in and on are often used in English to talk about places (physical positions) and times. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! If we examine these different aspects of usage for the three prepositions, a general pattern emerges. With clock times: With festivals: Related:  emilkovac

Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar If you’ve been reading the blog recently, you’ll know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be writing a post highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fourth day in my Christmas posting extravaganza and with each passing day I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! In the first three of my posts, I offered grammar advice on a particular verb tense. Today, I’m changing direction a little by looking at utilizing video clips to teach grammar in general. Please click on the image and vote for ‘How to get 10 grammar teaching activities from one video clip.’ Today’s offering is a reposting of a very popular post from March of this year. Now, on to business. How to get 10 grammar teaching activities from one video clip Talking about the past 1.

Day 3 of my Grammarly Christmas: past perfect and past perfect continuous Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the third day of my Christmas posting extravaganza and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue with an old classic, by looking at the past perfect simple and continuous tenses… The concept of the past perfect is often easier to grasp for learners of English than the present perfect (see yesterday’s post for some ideas about the present perfect), partly because the event being discussed is usually clearly in the past. What are the past perfect simple and continuous tenses? A. 1. 2. 3.

Day 2 of my Grammarly Christmas: for and since with present perfect Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Let’s continue in classic style, by looking at the differences between the uses of for and since with the present perfect simple tense… On the face of it, the way we use ‘for’ and ‘since’ with the present perfect is really straightforward. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! What are ‘for’ and ‘since’ and how might we use them with the present perfect simple tense? I know her for two years.

Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous Well, everyone… it’s Christmas and I’m in a sharing mood! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll post an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Sounds a little bit crazy already, doesn’t it? Let’s start in classic style, by looking at the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense… Although the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense are subtle, understanding them can be important for correctly conveying our thoughts. Skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! What’s the Present Perfect Simple? Examples: How do we use these tenses? 1.

Day 10 of my Grammarly Christmas: an activity for teaching there is/are Welcome once again to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now day ten of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Today’s post focuses on a great tool for teaching there is/there are… Being an expat English language teacher, it shouldn’t be too surprising that I’m something of a traveler and a geography nut. Geoguessr The BBC Travel website’s ‘Geoguessr’ is a game that gives your learners the chance to prove how well they know the world. Screenshot from the Geoguessr app How can we exploit this app for language teaching? This format readily lends itself to many language items, especially those we regularly encounter at lower levels:

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Re-imagining the grammar classics: The personalized gap fill This is the first in a series of blog posts in which I’ll present a range of activities that can be used in class with minimal – or even no – preparation at all. Most of these activities revolve around reviewing or extending grammar structures, and as such are designed to be as flexible as possible and thus usable in many different situations. First up we look at a way of personalizing gap fill exercises so that they work in a more meaningful and motivational way in your language class. The personalized gap fill Gap fills are probably the most common type of exercise in the language classroom. Nevertheless, they are also the most boring and uninspiring. What do you need? If you want to do this in the simplest way possible all you need is a pen and a board. Personalizing your gap fill will have a positive effect on your class! Setting things up for version 1 Learners copy down the sentences, fill in the gaps with the words and then decide if they are true or false. Adam __________ in Istanbul.

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Re-imagining the grammar classics: Using the DO IT technique with gap fill exercises This is the second in a series of blog posts in which I’ll present a range of activities that can be used in class with minimal – or even no – preparation at all. Most of these activities revolve around reviewing or extending grammar structures, and as such are designed to be as flexible as possible and thus usable in many different situations. First up we looked at a way of personalizing gap fill exercises so that they work in a more meaningful and motivational way in your language class. This time I consider what to do when faced with making gap fills that we find in books more meaningful and how to inspire some creative thinking when completing them. What is DO IT? They like to DO IT, DO IT! DO IT is a fantastically simple way of enhancing the creative thought processes that are perhaps overlooked when preparing for exams. Applying it to our context I’ve never worked in any educational institution that hasn’t used a gapped text to test learners’ knowledge of verb tenses.

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