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Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar

Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar
If you’ve been reading the blog recently, you’ll know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be writing a post highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fourth day in my Christmas posting extravaganza and with each passing day I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! In the first three of my posts, I offered grammar advice on a particular verb tense. Today, I’m changing direction a little by looking at utilizing video clips to teach grammar in general. To be honest, I have an ulterior motive for this! Please click on the image and vote for ‘How to get 10 grammar teaching activities from one video clip.’ Today’s offering is a reposting of a very popular post from March of this year. Now, on to business. That really is something, isn’t it?

http://www.teachthemenglish.com/2014/12/day-4-of-my-grammarly-christmas-using-video-clips-to-teach-grammar/

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Day 3 of my Grammarly Christmas: past perfect and past perfect continuous Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Day 2 of my Grammarly Christmas: for and since with present perfect Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is only the second day of my Christmas posting extravaganza, but I’m already feeling confident I can do it! Let’s continue in classic style, by looking at the differences between the uses of for and since with the present perfect simple tense…

Day 5 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of time Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fifth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m nearly half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it!

Day 6 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of place Those of you who’ve dropped by recently will know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting on a well-known and well-loved grammar theme. Today is now the sixth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m officially half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue what I started on day five, with an old classic: prepositions of place… The prepositions at, in and on are often used in English to talk about places (physical positions) and times. Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous Well, everyone… it’s Christmas and I’m in a sharing mood! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll post an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Sounds a little bit crazy already, doesn’t it? Well, maybe it is, but I’m in a festive mood, so I’ll give it a go! Let’s start in classic style, by looking at the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense…

Day 7 of my Grammarly Christmas: adverbs of frequency A warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’… Confused? Basically, every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the seventh day (here’s what you missed yesterday) of my Christmas posting extravaganza meaning I’m on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, adverbs of frequency… An adverb of frequency is exactly what it sounds like… an adverb of time. In other words, adverbs of frequency always describe how often something occurs, either in definite or indefinite terms.

Day 8 of my Grammarly Christmas: demonstrative adjectives and pronouns A very warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ To bring you up to speed if you haven’t been frequenting the blog recently, every day for twelve days I’m posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the eighth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m well and truly on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, demonstratives… This, That, These, Those are called demonstratives and they are used to show the relative distance between the speaker and the noun.

Day 10 of my Grammarly Christmas: an activity for teaching there is/are Welcome once again to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now day ten of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon!

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