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Day 3 of my Grammarly Christmas: past perfect and past perfect continuous

Day 3 of my Grammarly Christmas: past perfect and past perfect continuous
Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the third day of my Christmas posting extravaganza and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue with an old classic, by looking at the past perfect simple and continuous tenses… The concept of the past perfect is often easier to grasp for learners of English than the present perfect (see yesterday’s post for some ideas about the present perfect), partly because the event being discussed is usually clearly in the past. What are the past perfect simple and continuous tenses? A. 1. 2. 3. Related:  emilkovac

Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar If you’ve been reading the blog recently, you’ll know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be writing a post highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fourth day in my Christmas posting extravaganza and with each passing day I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! In the first three of my posts, I offered grammar advice on a particular verb tense. Please click on the image and vote for ‘How to get 10 grammar teaching activities from one video clip.’ Today’s offering is a reposting of a very popular post from March of this year. Rather than making you search through my blog for the original, plus the fact that it fits nicely into my Grammarly Christmas theme, I thought I’d make it today’s festive post. Now, on to business. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Day 2 of my Grammarly Christmas: for and since with present perfect Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is only the second day of my Christmas posting extravaganza, but I’m already feeling confident I can do it! Let’s continue in classic style, by looking at the differences between the uses of for and since with the present perfect simple tense… On the face of it, the way we use ‘for’ and ‘since’ with the present perfect is really straightforward. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! Still confused?

Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous Well, everyone… it’s Christmas and I’m in a sharing mood! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll post an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Let’s start in classic style, by looking at the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense… Although the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense are subtle, understanding them can be important for correctly conveying our thoughts. Skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! What’s the Present Perfect Simple? Examples: I have heard the news.He has spoken to the manager. How do we use these tenses?

Day 5 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of time Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fifth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m nearly half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue with an old classic, by looking at prepositions of time… The prepositions at, in and on are often used in English to talk about places (physical positions) and times. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! If we examine these different aspects of usage for the three prepositions, a general pattern emerges. With clock times: With festivals:

Day 10 of my Grammarly Christmas: an activity for teaching there is/are Welcome once again to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now day ten of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Today’s post focuses on a great tool for teaching there is/there are… Being an expat English language teacher, it shouldn’t be too surprising that I’m something of a traveler and a geography nut. Geoguessr The BBC Travel website’s ‘Geoguessr’ is a game that gives your learners the chance to prove how well they know the world. Screenshot from the Geoguessr app How can we exploit this app for language teaching? This format readily lends itself to many language items, especially those we regularly encounter at lower levels:

Day 6 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of place Those of you who’ve dropped by recently will know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting on a well-known and well-loved grammar theme. Today is now the sixth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m officially half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue what I started on day five, with an old classic: prepositions of place… The prepositions at, in and on are often used in English to talk about places (physical positions) and times. These prepositions can be incredibly tricky for learners, because sometimes the choice of one over another in a particular phrase or sentence seems arbitrary. Today I’m eschewing the format I’ve been following a little bit because I’m going straight on to a selection of activities. Let me set the scene for today’s post with a bit of background info… What do you need? 1. You can set this activity up very quickly. ELTPics courtesy of @fionamau 2. 3.

Day 7 of my Grammarly Christmas: adverbs of frequency A warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’… Confused? Basically, every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the seventh day (here’s what you missed yesterday) of my Christmas posting extravaganza meaning I’m on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, adverbs of frequency… An adverb of frequency is exactly what it sounds like… an adverb of time. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! What are adverbs of frequency and how do I teach them? We often use adverbs of frequency with the present simple tense to say ‘how often’ we do something. Still confused? 1. 2. 3.

Irregular Verb Dictionary Englishpage.com's Irregular Verb Dictionary for English learners contains over 370 irregular verbs used in modern English. To view our Extended Irregular Verb Dictionary, which contains over 470 verbs including rare and antiquated forms, Click Here. Alternate forms are separated by /. Flashcards & Exercises | About Dictionary Your personal online English school.

Re-imagining the grammar classics: The personalized gap fill This is the first in a series of blog posts in which I’ll present a range of activities that can be used in class with minimal – or even no – preparation at all. Most of these activities revolve around reviewing or extending grammar structures, and as such are designed to be as flexible as possible and thus usable in many different situations. First up we look at a way of personalizing gap fill exercises so that they work in a more meaningful and motivational way in your language class. The personalized gap fill Gap fills are probably the most common type of exercise in the language classroom. What do you need? If you want to do this in the simplest way possible all you need is a pen and a board. Personalizing your gap fill will have a positive effect on your class! Setting things up for version 1 Learners copy down the sentences, fill in the gaps with the words and then decide if they are true or false. Let’s imagine how this works with a few examples using various grammar structures.

Day 8 of my Grammarly Christmas: demonstrative adjectives and pronouns A very warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ To bring you up to speed if you haven’t been frequenting the blog recently, every day for twelve days I’m posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the eighth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m well and truly on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, demonstratives… This, That, These, Those are called demonstratives and they are used to show the relative distance between the speaker and the noun. It seems simple, but these words can cause a lot of bother to language learners. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! Examples:

Day 9 of my Grammarly Christmas: fun and motivating grammar activities for beginner classes Welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the ninth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Grammar exercises are a fundamental ingredient of many language lessons, but can become a bit of a drag for both us and our learners if we’re not careful. However, grammar need not necessarily become a dry and tedious affair. If we can make grammar exercises as learner-focused and interactive as possible, we can keep them interesting, enjoyable and, most importantly, effective. 1. The format is simple and therefore easily recognizable to every learner… a surefire winner! ‘Dice & cup’ from @aClilToClimb at ELTPics 2. 3.

69 Fun Facts about the UK With the Olympics currently going on and taking place in London, I think this has only fuelled everyone’s obsession with everything British – because really, everyone has at least one totally British thing they love (Whether it’s rock music, Harry Potter, the Royal Family, tea, soccer, culture, or the lovely British accent). So here’s 69 fun facts about the UK. Enjoy! 1. Big Ben does not refer to the clock, but actually the bell. 2. All about the Royal Family 17. photo cred: stylesectionla.com 22. Famous Brits 29. photo cred; api.ning.com London 39. The 2012 Olympics 49. Misc. 56. photo cred: 58. photo cred: Tagged as: england, fun facts, great britain, interesting facts, london, uk

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