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Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous

Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous
Well, everyone… it’s Christmas and I’m in a sharing mood! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll post an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Sounds a little bit crazy already, doesn’t it? Well, maybe it is, but I’m in a festive mood, so I’ll give it a go! Let’s start in classic style, by looking at the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense… Although the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense are subtle, understanding them can be important for correctly conveying our thoughts. Skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! 1. 2.

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Day 2 of my Grammarly Christmas: for and since with present perfect Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is only the second day of my Christmas posting extravaganza, but I’m already feeling confident I can do it! Let’s continue in classic style, by looking at the differences between the uses of for and since with the present perfect simple tense… On the face of it, the way we use ‘for’ and ‘since’ with the present perfect is really straightforward.

Day 3 of my Grammarly Christmas: past perfect and past perfect continuous Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas! As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the third day of my Christmas posting extravaganza and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar If you’ve been reading the blog recently, you’ll know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be writing a post highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fourth day in my Christmas posting extravaganza and with each passing day I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! In the first three of my posts, I offered grammar advice on a particular verb tense.

Day 10 of my Grammarly Christmas: an activity for teaching there is/are Welcome once again to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now day ten of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Today’s post focuses on a great tool for teaching there is/there are…

Re-imagining the grammar classics: The personalized gap fill This is the first in a series of blog posts in which I’ll present a range of activities that can be used in class with minimal – or even no – preparation at all. Most of these activities revolve around reviewing or extending grammar structures, and as such are designed to be as flexible as possible and thus usable in many different situations. First up we look at a way of personalizing gap fill exercises so that they work in a more meaningful and motivational way in your language class. The personalized gap fill Gap fills are probably the most common type of exercise in the language classroom. Day 5 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of time Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fifth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m nearly half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue with an old classic, by looking at prepositions of time…

Day 8 of my Grammarly Christmas: demonstrative adjectives and pronouns A very warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ To bring you up to speed if you haven’t been frequenting the blog recently, every day for twelve days I’m posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the eighth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m well and truly on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, demonstratives… This, That, These, Those are called demonstratives and they are used to show the relative distance between the speaker and the noun. It seems simple, but these words can cause a lot of bother to language learners.

Day 6 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of place Those of you who’ve dropped by recently will know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting on a well-known and well-loved grammar theme. Today is now the sixth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m officially half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue what I started on day five, with an old classic: prepositions of place… The prepositions at, in and on are often used in English to talk about places (physical positions) and times. These prepositions can be incredibly tricky for learners, because sometimes the choice of one over another in a particular phrase or sentence seems arbitrary.

Re-imagining the grammar classics: Using the DO IT technique with gap fill exercises This is the second in a series of blog posts in which I’ll present a range of activities that can be used in class with minimal – or even no – preparation at all. Most of these activities revolve around reviewing or extending grammar structures, and as such are designed to be as flexible as possible and thus usable in many different situations. First up we looked at a way of personalizing gap fill exercises so that they work in a more meaningful and motivational way in your language class. Day 7 of my Grammarly Christmas: adverbs of frequency A warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’… Confused? Basically, every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the seventh day (here’s what you missed yesterday) of my Christmas posting extravaganza meaning I’m on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel!

Day 9 of my Grammarly Christmas: fun and motivating grammar activities for beginner classes Welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the ninth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Grammar exercises are a fundamental ingredient of many language lessons, but can become a bit of a drag for both us and our learners if we’re not careful. However, grammar need not necessarily become a dry and tedious affair. If we can make grammar exercises as learner-focused and interactive as possible, we can keep them interesting, enjoyable and, most importantly, effective.

Drowning for Freedom: Libya’s Migrant Jails (Part 1) As Libya descends further into civil war and lawlessness, migrants from Africa and the Middle East continue to journey to the country's coast in search of smugglers to take them across the Mediterranean Sea and into Europe. Search and rescue operations by Libya's coast guard are restricted due to diminishing resources, and have to contend with dangerous gangs of armed traffickers. Those rescued at sea by the coast guard are brought to detention centers, where they face deplorable conditions and are forced to remain for long periods of time. In some instances, migrants are detained by militias in unofficial prisons outside of government control.

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