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A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future

A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future
Over the next generation, whether they work for corporations, small businesses, government organizations, nonprofits, or other organizations, many U.S. employees will move from working primarily with American colleagues, bosses, and customers for American organizations in U.S. cities, to being part of global teams. As leaders, they will use technology to bridge geographic divides, build organizations that transcend borders, and work together with colleagues from around the world on issues such as climate change, food security, and population growth -- issues that require multinational teams coming together to effect change. For those whose work is closer to home, the changing demographics of the U.S. will mean that their colleagues, customers, and neighbors may look a lot less like them, and have fewer shared histories than American colleagues, customers, and neighbors have shared in the past. 1. Leverage real-world case studies. 2. 3. 4. 5.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/look-inside-classroom-of-future-dana-mortenson

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Outstanding in Your Field: What It Takes to Be a Great Teacher Steven Covey wrote a book, The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness, to help organizations and individuals find their own voices. Covey describes voice as the internal drive to face challenges and rise to overcome them. He explains that each of us has a voice that lies at the central confluence of talent, need, passion, and conscience. The premise of the book was that if you didn't find your own unique significance (voice), neither you nor your organization would be able to achieve greatness. After I read this book, I considered the word "greatness" for a long time.

Classic Dip Recipe: Chile Con Queso Classic Dip Recipe: Chile Con Queso What good is a party without chips and dip? Of course, you could go to the food store and pick up jarred dip, but who knows what's in that? I'm pretty sure there isn't any real cheese in your average jar of queso. Personalized Learning in K-12 Schools: How Do We Make it Happen?  The idea that no two students learn in exactly the same way is nothing new. Even back in the 1800s, Helen Parkhurst was advocating for an educational system that took the personalized needs of the student into account when developing curriculum and helped children learn independence, both academically and in life. Her "Dalton Plan" was formulated with the thought that all students learn at a different pace and should be allowed to take the time they need to work through their studies and explore the areas that interest them the most.

When the Computer Takes Over for the Teacher — Atlantic Mobile Whenever a college student asks me, a veteran high-school English educator, about the prospects of becoming a public-school teacher, I never think it’s enough to say that the role is shifting from "content expert" to "curriculum facilitator." Instead, I describe what I think the public-school classroom will look like in 20 years, with a large, fantastic computer screen at the front, streaming one of the nation’s most engaging, informative lessons available on a particular topic. The "virtual class" will be introduced, guided, and curated by one of the country’s best teachers (a.k.a. a "super-teacher"), and it will include professionally produced footage of current events, relevant excerpts from powerful TedTalks, interactive games students can play against other students nationwide, and a formal assessment that the computer will immediately score and record. "So if you want to be a teacher," I tell the college student, "you better be a super-teacher." I started reflecting. Well then.

Harvard Business School really has created the classroom of the future - Fortune © Time Inc. All rights reserved. Fortune.com is a part of the Time.com network of sites. Powered by WordPress.com VIP Email address or Password is incorrect Forgot Password? Five-Minute Film Festival: Developing Global Citizens In our increasingly connected and interdependent world, it’s critically important that young people have opportunities to engage with diverse cultural perspectives, build geographic knowledge, grow global competency, and develop the skills and knowledge necessary to consider and address our shared global challenges. At Global Education Day in Atlanta this year, I was inspired by all the ways that educators are bringing these kinds of experiences into the classroom. How do you teach global citizenship? Check out this video playlist for ideas and inspiration. Video Playlist: Developing Global Citizens

Using Film to Teach Analysis Skills Growing up, my family's Sunday night ritual was always the single word, dinner-and-a-movie. We were passionate about cinema, and a post-movie debate was always included in the evening's entertainment. In fact, one of the most memorable fights with my dad was over his inability to delay his analysis of Hoosiers before the end credits had even rolled. Needless to say, it wasn't just the movies themselves that became like a different food group to me; it was the enthusiastic post-movie analysis that also gave me sustenance. During these talks, my sister and I brought in our prior knowledge from other books, from other movies, and from what few experiences we already had. Movie Criticism in the Classroom

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming. In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code.

Educational Leadership:Teaching for the 21st Century:What Would Socrates Say? Peter W. Cookson Jr. Socrates believed that we learn best by asking essential questions and testing tentative answers against reason and fact in a continual and virtuous circle of honest debate. 8 Technologies That Will Shape Future Classrooms What does the future of learning hold? What will classrooms of the future be like? Emerging technologies such as cloud computing, augmented reality (AR) and 3D printing are paving the way for the future of education in ways we may have yet to see. At the very least though, we can extrapolate from what these promising technologies and predict how schools will adopt them in time to come. However, just as the original intentions for new technology often give way to innovative and unpredictable usage, we can never be sure if a twist is waiting for these rising stars.

30 Techniques to Quiet a Noisy Class One day, in front 36 riotous sophomores, I clutched my chest and dropped to my knees like Sergeant Elias at the end of Platoon. Instantly, dead silence and open mouths replaced classroom Armageddon. Standing up like nothing had happened, I said, "Thanks for your attention -- let's talk about love poems." I never used that stunt again. After all, should a real emergency occur, it would be better if students call 911 rather than post my motionless body on YouTube. I've thought this through.

Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments. We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur. Brain Breaks A brain break is a short period of time when we change up the dull routine of incoming information that arrives via predictable, tedious, well-worn roadways. Our brains are wired for novelty.

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