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Future of Work: What Skills Will Help Us Keep Pace?

Future of Work: What Skills Will Help Us Keep Pace?
From Elon Musk’s tweet that artificial intelligence may be more dangerous than nuclear weapons to the growing clamor of voices warning robots will take away our jobs, it is clear we are focusing more on the problems of AI, robotics, and automation than the solutions. While the problems are real and should be taken into account, social innovators around the world are already working to deliver solutions. It’s true that today’s technology is reworking the economy and our role in it. But this needn’t herald economic end times. To smooth the transition, we need to ensure that displaced workers have the resources to learn new work and children are given a good head start. This is nothing new. During the Industrial Revolution, in the US, we demanded every child attend school and learn reading, writing and math. Throughout the 20th century, humanity poured tremendous resources into ensuring every human develop these skills as technologies advanced. Image Credit: Ashoka; Shutterstock.com

http://singularityhub.com/2014/12/18/future-of-work-what-skills-will-help-us-keep-pace/

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10 well paid jobs of the future Mr Bellini posited the idea of an elderly well-being consultant, who specialises in personalised care for older patients, or a memory augmentation surgeon who helps counter memory loss. He also saw big changes in farming as food resources became scarce, with genetically modified crops becoming common and crops grown vertically in areas resembling multi-storey car parks to save space. Ian Pearson, a futurologist who wrote You Tomorrow, sees job growth in the field of augmented reality, where the real world is overlaid with computer-generated images. Is it an -ism or is it art ? CCK08 – In my student days in South Africa, a local hit song imprinted on those biochemical pathways in my brain that connect me through memory and music to 1984. Niki Daly’s “Is it an ism or is it art” didn’t really comment on the UDF, school boycotts, and the rising tide of resistance to apartheid – but it did make us arty types think more deeply about the relationship of artists to critics, the reification of artistic fads, and I suppose the album as whole did question the white dream of insulated existence in the larney suburbs…. The first 3 weeks of CCK08 evoked that song for me as I trawled through the blogs and lurked in the Moodle forums – skimming the posts, assimilating and accommodating, just immersing myself in the network in a passive kind of a way, feeling a tad guilty as I took precious time out of a busy RL day to follow some threads. Got a feel for it now and can hopefully start contributing back into the conversations.

The Future of Work: Quantified Employees, Pop-Up Workplaces, And More Telepresence For many people, especially those working at desk jobs, the workplace is very different than it was 20 years ago: there’s a computer at every desk, telecommuting is fairly common, and the traditional cubicle is giving way to more collaborative spaces. We’ve seen predictions about where we’ll go from here before; now PSFK, a popular blog that also happens to be a thriving consultancy, has come up with its own version of the future of work, described in a new 138-page report. It’s not as fantastical as many future-forward reports--it’s planted firmly in ideas that are already gaining a lot of traction. No More Fake News Logic and Faith in the context of Jon Rappoport's Logic and Analysis Course. By Jon Rappoport, Author of the LOGIC AND ANALYSIS COURSE qjrconsulting@gmail.com I’m approaching home-schooling parents with this course, because I believe a revolution in the education system should begin at home, with the family.

What Makes the Best Infographics So Convincing - Andrea Ovans A great infographic is an instant revelation. It can compress time and space. (Good gosh – Usain Bolt is that much faster than all the other 100-meter gold medalists who’ve ever competed?) It can illuminate patterns in massive amounts of data. (Sure, we’re spending much more on health care and education than our grandparents did. But look how much less on housing.) Garbage designer, robot counsellor among the predicted jobs of 2030 About 15 years from now, farmers will have made their way from the countryside to the city, counsellors will help ensure the right robot goes to the right family and garbage designers will lead the upcycling movement. Those are some predictions made by the Canadian Scholarship Trust Plan’s Inspired Minds initiative, which aims to give Canadians a sneak peek of the job market in 2030. Some of the more curious careers include: Nostalgist: A mix between a therapist, an interior designer and a historical researcher, a nostalgist will help the wealthy elderly of 2030 create a living space inspired by their favourite decade. Rewilder: The old name for this job was "farmer." But instead of growing crops, rewilders will be tasked with undoing environmental damage to the countryside.

Quizzes Take any of the following quizzes, all based on scientific research, to learn more about yourself, your emotional makeup, and how you relate to others. The quizzes are also chock-full of practical tips for cultivating positive emotions and stronger relationships. Featured Quiz Empathy Quiz How well do you feel and understand what others are feeling? Social Capital Quiz

Augmented reality in education: teaching tool or passing trend? What some may call an 'unsurprising' 71% of 16 to 24-years-olds own smartphones, so why aren't teachers utilising these in the classroom or campus? Is the use of these devices going to detract from the learning process or contribute to future workplace skills? Should teachers be using techniques such as augmented reality (AR) to engage students and develop their skills for the modern world? Well, I say 'yes'. I believe we should be embracing these opportunities. For instance I see AR as a real opportunity for colleges and universities, not only as a way to market and promote themselves, but as a way to communicate with learners and improve the student experience.

If Schools Don't Change, Robots Will Bring On a 'Permanent Underclass': Report Robots are taking all the jobs. But are we, the average, moderately skilled humans, screwed, or aren't we? Let me just get it out of the way now: We are, unless there are drastic, immediate changes to education and economic systems around the world. The dominant narrative going around today about Pew Research's new report on artificial intelligence and the future of jobs is that experts can't really decide whether automation is going to make working obsolete, that it's really a toss up whether robots will simply create new jobs in other sectors as they destroy ones in other. That's true, in one sense: The 1,896 futurists, CEOs, journalists, and university professors questioned for the report were split in half over robots will "displace significant numbers of both blue- and white-collar workers," with 52 percent of respondents agreeing that "human ingenuity will create new jobs, industries, and ways to make a living, just as it has been doing since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution."

Fabulous Fall Cupcakes My husband and I live near Colonial Williamsburg. It is not unusual to see ladies in bonnets driving to work in the morning or men decked out in full colonial garb grabbing coffee at a gas station. I kind of love it. Now that the weather is nicer (or just not so oh-my-god-I’m-about-to-spontaneously-combust hot), we decided to visit a couple days ago – Instagram followers will remember the awesome candy apple we grabbed while we were there! I love fall – but I LOVE fall in Colonial Williamsburg. How augmented reality works - Virtual Reality How does augmented reality work? Is it similar to virtual reality? It is similar in that the user views a series of images via a pair of 3D glasses or a head mounted display (HMD).

LEGAL FUTURES Report: artificial intelligence will cause "structural collapse" of law firms by 2030 1 December 2014 AI: computers that ‘think’ spell doom for many lawyers Robots and artificial intelligence (AI) will dominate legal practice within 15 years, perhaps leading to the “structural collapse” of law firms, a report predicting the shape of the legal market has envisaged. Civilisation 2030: The near future for law firms, by Jomati Consultants, foresees a world in which population growth is actually slowing, with “peak humanity” occurring as early as 2055, and ageing populations bringing a growth in demand for legal work on issues affecting older people. This could mean more advice needed by healthcare and specialist construction companies on the building and financing of hospitals, and on pension investment businesses, as well as financial and regulatory work around the demographic changes to come; more age-related litigation, IP battles between pharmaceutical companies, and around so-called “geriatric-tech” related IP. The human part of lawyering would shrink.

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