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Books worth reading, recommended by Bill Gates, Susan Cain and more

Books worth reading, recommended by Bill Gates, Susan Cain and more
Creativity Creative Confidence, by Tom Kelley and David Kelley Crown Business, 2013 Recommended by: Tim Brown (TED Talk: Designers — think big!) “‘Creative confidence’ is the creative mindset that goes along with design thinking’s creative skill set.”See more of Tim Brown’s favorite books. Creating Minds, by Howard Gardner Basic Books, 2011 Recommended by: Roselinde Torres (TED Talk: What it takes to be a great leader) “Gardner’s book was first published more than twenty years ago, but its insights into the creative process — told through the stories of seven remarkable individuals from different fields — remain just as relevant today. While they shared some traits, they all followed different paths to success.”See more of Roselinde Torres’ favorite books. Design Happiness Man’s Search for Meaning, by Viktor E. Your Money or Your Life, by Vicki Robin et al. Waking Up, Alive, by Richard A. History Language On the Shoulders of Giants, by Robert K. Philosophy

http://ideas.ted.com/2014/12/16/books-worth-reading-this-holiday-recommended-by-bill-gates-susan-cain-and-more/

Related:  To ReadLibros - BooksSaved articlesalternFeb 19, 2015

10 Essential Books for Book Nerds What makes a book nerd? Reading a lot of books — and liking to talk about said books — is a major requirement, of course, but there’s often something a little more nebulous involved: book nerds are the kinds of people who get a little thrill when walking into a bookstore, who press volumes into their friends’ hands with serious promises of life changing moments, who are fascinated by following the many tangled threads through authors and literature, happily wandering wherever they might lead. Robin Sloan’s recently published Mr.

6 Bad Postures That Are Ruining Your Health & How To Correct Them Jeff Roberts, Collective Evolution | Straighten up that back soldier! No seriously, if you are like the majority of the population, chances are you are suffering from symptoms correlated with bad posture. Catching a glimpse of myself in the mirror, it’s easy to see that I have forward neck/head posture. Stark warning from ex Bank of England regulator 19th November 2015 In an important speech given at the Finance Watch conference in Brussels on Tuesday, Robert Jenkins — a former member of the Bank of England’s financial policy committee — highlighted the dangers of a two-tier justice system in which senior bankers are effectively ‘above the law’. He also said that 47 banking scandals and the feeble nature of most post-crisis financial reforms suggest that governments around the world would be ill-advised to cave in to the demands of bankers and finance sector lobbyists seeking a return to ‘business as usual’

How to Be Awesome on Instagram There isn’t, and there likely won’t ever be, a shortage of content on social media. The volume of stuff out there and the fact that everything travels so quickly can also make it seem like it’s really rare to see something new. One of our Danish clients, Mystery Makers, just created a very cool Instagram photo contest that uses the app in a way that’s totally new, as far as I can tell. Mystery Makers is a local client here in Copenhagen, and the creators of a live escape game called Mystery Room.

Maxims and mottoes from masters of one-liners: A reading list “Fiction is a dignified form of lies.” “What’s hard to express is easy to understand.” “Everything existing in the universe is the fruit of chance and necessity.” Professional aphorist and all round word nerd James Geary (TED Talk: Metaphorically speaking) collects aphorisms like these — and documents their provenance in his own books. Here, check out his list of must-read books from other authors covering literary life, proverbs, aphorisms, and the art of being quoted. 1.

The Guggenheim Puts 109 Free Modern Art Books Online Back in January, 2012, we mentioned that the Guggenheim (the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed modern art museum in NYC) had put 65 art catalogues on the web, all free of charge. We’re happy to report that, between then and now, the number of free texts has grown to 109. Published between 1937 and 1999, the art books/catalogues offer an intellectual and visual introduction to the work of Alexander Calder, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, Gustav Klimt & Egon Schiele, Fernand Léger, and Kandinsky. Plus there are other texts (e.g., Masterpieces of Modern Art and Abstract Expressionists Imagists) that tackle meta movements and themes. Anyone interested in the history of the Guggenheim will want to spend time with a collection called “The Syllabus.” It contains five books by Hilla Rebay, the museum’s first director and curator.

Ten Ways We Can Build a Better Economic System For the numerous readers who asked: "But what can we do?" after reading my "10 reasons to smash capitalism," here are ten ways we can build a better economic system: 10. We can elect governments that represent people rather than corporations. This will require serious electoral reform and include laws to make it clear corporations are not people and therefore cannot participate in the political process. A government representing all the people would regulate corporations to ensure socially responsible behaviour and transform psychopathic capitalist monstrosities into democratic, social enterprises that benefit all.

Three principles that will drive innovation for your brand Nowhere is the lexicon of marketing more testosterone-fuelled than in the arena of innovation. Once it was enough to aim for ‘new and improved’, through incremental innovation to an existing product line. No longer. 25 Books That Define Cool Let’s abandon the childish notion that reading isn’t cool. We’re grown men here and reading happens to be one of the many ways we enjoy spending a bit of our free time. Of course, sitting down with just any book doesn’t always make for a great experience. We want to read something with wit, masculinity, and a pervading sense of effortless cool.

The 10 Greatest Books Ever, According to 125 Top Authors (Download Them for Free) Earlier this month, we highlighted The 10 Greatest Films of All Time According to 846 Film Critics. Featuring films by Hitchcock, Kubrick, Welles and Fellini, this master list came together in 2012 when Sight & Sound (the cinema journal of the British Film Institute) asked contemporary critics and directors to name their 12 favorite movies. Nearly 900 cinephiles responded, and, from those submissions, a meta list of 10 was culled. So how about something similar for books, you ask?

A New Theory to Explain the Higgs Mass Three physicists who have been collaborating in the San Francisco Bay Area over the past year have devised a new solution to a mystery that has beleaguered their field for more than 30 years. This profound puzzle, which has driven experiments at increasingly powerful particle colliders and given rise to the controversial multiverse hypothesis, amounts to something a bright fourth-grader might ask: How can a magnet lift a paperclip against the gravitational pull of the entire planet? Despite its sway over the motion of stars and galaxies, the force of gravity is hundreds of millions of trillions of trillions of times weaker than magnetism and the other microscopic forces of nature.

L’Oreal and Burberry take advantage of RFID technology The applications for RFID package trackers in the personal care industry are vast. And more advanced technology means more options for beauty brands thinking digitally. The latesteAgile makes auto-identification products, from labels and tag to hardware and software. And the company’s UHF EPC compliant MicroWing inlay promises better performance, greater versatility, and superior durability in contrast to similar solutions. Radio Frequency Identification is not new, but it’s getting increasingly smarter and smaller.

1book140: Vote for a Nonfiction Book to Read in March After spending two evenings compiling and researching our many #1book140 nominations for March, I'd like to share a note I made to myself: “Nonfiction” might be an overly broad category for a typical month. Maybe next time, we should limit voting to no more than eight options (and not the fifteen below)? That said, the occasional free-for-all voting period can be fun, too. Let's see how this goes, and please share your comments below and on Twitter.

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