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SDN Test Suite – Methodology

SDN Test Suite – Methodology
SDN Test Suite – Methodology Typical SDN-based Network Virtualization The architecture rolled out can be one of the following: Pure-overlay: Programmable virtual dataplane elements (vDP) are inserted into edge servers and controlled by the controller cluster. They form overlay networks using tunnels that are routed over the legacy network fabric. Pure-underlay: SDN-enabled top-of-rack or leaf physical switches are deployed and controlled by the controller cluster. Testing these solutions irrespective of the architectural choice makes it essential to adopt a black-box testing methodology that integrates leverages components from the computing world and the networking world. Classes of Tests For testing Network Virtualization, we divided our tests into four main categories: Functionality tests: Essentially these test the claimed (and unclaimed) features of the network-virtualization solution, including the following. Setup for functionality and data plane tests using bare-metal servers Related:  SDN

OpenDaylight Application Developers' Tutorial | SDN Hub This tutorial is intended for developers new to SDN application development with OpenDaylight. We have come a long way from the earlier version of this tutorial to focus on MD-SAL, and Karaf in this tutorial. While OpenDaylight is not simply an OpenFlow controller, OpenFlow continues to be a popular south-bound and we use this in this tutorial to introduce the platform. An introductory presentation is available at slideshare. 1. To get started, download and set up the SDN Hub Tutorial VM in Virtualbox or VMware. The tutorial application that we will work with is located in /home/ubuntu/SDNHub_OpenDaylight_tutorial directory. Before we start, we recommend you run the following commands to update the tutorial code, which is available at ubuntu@sdnhubvm:~$ cd SDNHub_Opendaylight_Tutorial ubuntu@sdnhubvm:~$ git pull --rebase 2. OpenDayLight uses the following software tools/paradigms. 2.1 Maven and project building 2.3 Config subsystem 3.

Useful mininet setups | SDN Hub Mininet is a network emulation platform that is very useful to test SDN applications that you build. It can support different types of topologies. Here we showcase three popular configurations that will be helpful for testing. 1. Following command spawns a single switch with 3 hosts attached to it. $ sudo mn --arp --topo single,3 --mac --switch ovsk --controller remote In the above command, there are some important keywords worth paying attention to: –mac: Auto set MAC addresses–arp: Populate static ARP entries of each host in each other–switch: ovsk refers to kernel mode OVS–controller: remote controller can take IP address and port number as options You can now perform ping between hosts h1 and h2 using command h1 ping h2. 2. Following command spawns two switches connected to each other with a link and has one host on each switch. $ sudo mn --topo linear --switch ovsk --controller remote 3. Following command spawns a switch that has 3 servers and 1 client connected to it.

Software Defined Networking - Princeton University | Coursera About the Course This course introduces software defined networking, an emerging paradigm in computer networking that allows a logically centralized software program to control the behavior of an entire network. Separating a network's control logic from the underlying physical routers and switches that forward traffic allows network operators to write high-level control programs that specify the behavior of an entire network, in contrast to conventional networks, whereby network operators must codify functionality in terms of low-level device configuration. Logically centralized network control makes it possible for operators to specify more complex tasks that involve integrating many disjoint network functions (e.g., security, resource control, prioritization) into a single control framework, allowing network operators to create more sophisticated policies, and making network configurations easier to configure, manage, troubleshoot, and debug. Course Syllabus Module 3: Control Plane

University of Luxembourg - Daylight Project One of the great things about open source projects is that they provide a solid, easily available, and generally well documented basis for university research. This generally gives researchers the ability to concentrate just on the algorithms and instrumentation which they are interested in, without having to completely develop a software suite for the subject area they are studying. In the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) at the University of Luxembourg, researchers are using OpenDaylight as basis for addressing specific aspects in the context of the ongoing Cognitive Software Defined Networks (CoSDN) project. CoSDN seeks to combine the efficiency of SDN with cognitive learning algorithms and enhanced protocols to automatise SDN systems. Attack Detection (through learning): Having Defense4All as starting point, Dr. Contact details

Software Defined Networking course GA Tech About the Course This course introduces software defined networking, an emerging paradigm in computer networking that allows a logically centralized software program to control the behavior of an entire network. Separating a network's control logic from the underlying physical routers and switches that forward traffic allows network operators to write high-level control programs that specify the behavior of an entire network, in contrast to conventional networks, whereby network operators must codify functionality in terms of low-level device configuration. Logically centralized network control makes it possible for operators to specify more complex tasks that involve integrating many disjoint network functions (e.g., security, resource control, prioritization) into a single control framework, allowing network operators to create more sophisticated policies, and making network configurations easier to configure, manage, troubleshoot, and debug. Course Syllabus Module 3: Control Plane Prof.

What is software-defined networking (SDN)? - Definition from WhatIs.com Software-defined networking (SDN) is an umbrella term encompassing several kinds of network technology aimed at making the network as agile and flexible as the virtualized server and storage infrastructure of the modern data center. The goal of SDN is to allow network engineers and administrators to respond quickly to changing business requirements. In a software-defined network, a network administrator can shape traffic from a centralized control console without having to touch individual switches, and can deliver services to wherever they are needed in the network, without regard to what specific devices a server or other hardware components are connected to. The key technologies for SDN implementation are functional separation, network virtualization and automation through programmability. By submitting your personal information, you agree that TechTarget and its partners may contact you regarding relevant content, products and special offers.

SDN notes Spanning Tree and OpenFlow Questions I often get asked include: Can you run Spanning Tree and OpenFlow together?What happens when Spanning Tree blocks a port? What will OpenFlow do? Firstly, it is possible to run an OpenFlow network connected to the HP VAN SDN Controller with Spanning Tree turned off. In this blog entry I will show you a simple network with a look and demonstrate what happens with Spanning Tree turned off as well as on using HP Comware switches. VLAN 1 = Management VLAN (Used for communication with the Controller. In this topology I am using two 5900AF-48G-4XG-2QSFP+ switches with the following details: [5900-1]dis version HP Comware Software, Version 7.1.045, Release 2307 Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. [5900-2]dis version HP Comware Software, Version 7.1.045, Release 2307 Copyright (c) 2010-2013 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. In the output below, you can see that Spanning Tree is disabled on VLAN 10: VLAN 192 is the link to the HP VAN SDN Controller:

Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Definition - Open Networking Foundation What is SDN? The physical separation of the network control plane from the forwarding plane, and where a control plane controls several devices. Software-Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging architecture that is dynamic, manageable, cost-effective, and adaptable, making it ideal for the high-bandwidth, dynamic nature of today's applications. This architecture decouples the network control and forwarding functions enabling the network control to become directly programmable and the underlying infrastructure to be abstracted for applications and network services. The OpenFlow® protocol is a foundational element for building SDN solutions. The SDN architecture is: Computing Trends are Driving Network Change SDN addresses the fact that the static architecture of conventional networks is ill-suited to the dynamic computing and storage needs of today’s data centers, campuses, and carrier environments. Open Networking Foundation: Dedicated to SDN Become an ONF Member →

OpenFlow » Enabling research with OpenFlow These videos demonstrate different research experiments that build on top of OpenFlow. If you have similar videos that demonstrate your research and are interested in hosting them here, please contact Nikhil Handigol. Introduction FlowVisor Demo Aster*x: Load-Balancing as a Network Primitive Using All Wireless Networks Around Me Packet and Circuit Network Convergence ElasticTree: Reducing Energy in Data Center Networks Dynamic Flow Aggregation in an OpenFlow Network Open Pipes: Hardware System Design with OpenFlow Providing MPLS Serviceswith OpenFlow This is a 30 minute 4-part video from a live plenary demo by Stanford researchers at the 9th GENI Engineering Conference held at Washington DC, Nov 2-4, 2010. Part 1- Guido (Intro) Part 2 - Nikhil (Aster*x : Load-balancing as a network primitive) Part 3- KK (Using all wireless networks around us) Part 4 - Guru (Conclusion)

Libvirt - Intro and Basic Configuration I’ve been hearing a lot about libvirt, so I figured I’d check it out, and see if I could play around with it in my own home lab. According to the wiki, libvirt is a ”collection of software that provides a convenient way to manage virtual machines and other virtualization functionality, such as storage and network interface management.” Okay that’s pretty cool - basically if I have a multi-hypervisor environment, I can build my operational policies around libvirt, so that no matter what hypervisor a workload is being instantiated on, the process is the same. The thing I’ve been wondering is the role of libvirt in software like OpenStack - I’ve heard from some that it’s heavily used, and then I hear that OpenStack can/does interact directly with the hypervisor. One thing to note is that although libvirt supports the above ‘drivers’, using native APIs (such as the Xen XML-RPC API) is almost always going to provide more functionality vs. libvirt. Preparing Open vSwitch Preparing Storage Pools

Open vSwitch on VirtualBox - NetworkStatic | Brent Salisbury's Blog Here is a quick tutorial for installing Open vSwitch on VirtualBox. VirtualBox is an open source virtualization project from Oracle. It is supported on Windows, Mac, BSD and Linux to name a few. Install VirtualBox from the VirtualBox repository. Install Open vSwitch from Package. Install dependencies and install from source on Ubuntu Linux. To setup the virtual interfaces use Tuntap. For testing Open vSwitch or any other hypervisor testing, I highly recommend this Linux image linux-0.2.img. You can put the following into a text file and give it execute permissions with “chmod +x filename” and then run it “. Download your test image. Create a new Virtualbox instance. Thanks for stopping by.

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