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Google self-driving car has no steering wheel or brake

Google self-driving car has no steering wheel or brake
If you're uneasy at the idea of riding in a vehicle that drives itself, just wait till you see Google's new car. It has no gas pedal, no brake and no steering wheel. Google has been demonstrating its driverless technology for several years by retrofitting Toyotas, Lexuses and other cars with cameras and sensors. But now, for the first time, the company has unveiled a prototype of its own: a cute little car that looks like a cross between a VW Beetle and a golf cart. "They won't have a steering wheel, accelerator pedal, or brake pedal ... because they don't need them," Google said Tuesday in a blog post introducing the unnamed electric vehicles. "Our software and sensors do all the work." Unlike previous models, these cars won't have human drivers monitoring them at all times. The cars' speed for now has been capped at 25 mph, allowing engineers to minimize the risk of crashes during testing. Inside, the spartan cars have few dashboard controls, no glove box and no stereo.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/28/tech/innovation/google-self-driving-car/index.html

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Four Ways Schools Will Be Different in 10 Years Over the course of the last several hundred years, very little has changed with respect to schools. Sure, there have been minor tweaks like the switch from blackboards to dry erase boards, and the addition of computers and projectors. Today, however, we find ourselves on the precipice of several seismic shifts in education that will completely transform the way teachers educate and the way children experience the classroom. Here are EdWorld’s best predictions regarding ways in which schools are likely to be dramatically different 10 years from now: #4. The Best 3D Printer for Schools and Education This 3d printer is much, much easier to use, maintain, and set up than other printers. It will also print faster and more accurately than anything else you will find in this price range. Here are seven reasons why an Airwolf 3D printer is the best 3D printer for schools: Airwolf 3D Printers are fast. Students can usually see their object materialize within the span of a 1 hour class session.

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