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Proper Audio Recording Levels

Proper Audio Recording Levels
NOTICE: If you don't want to read any this or just don't care to understand it, there's a "dumbed down" version at the bottom. Let me get something out of the way here - I'm going to try to keep this very "fool proof" - I'm not trying to sound or present this very scientifically - This is just the rantings of hundreds and hundreds of posts on a dozen or more audio forums exploding like a volcano recorded with lots of headroom. I just hope to instill a basic understanding of why certain trends and common beliefs are just plain bad. And by the time you're done reading, and perhaps doing a little experimentation based on this, you won't need me to prove it. You'll know it yourself. Is this a "miracle cure" for bad recordings? So, if you've been struggling with recordings that sound "weak" or "small" or too dense or "just not 'pro' enough" then please, read on. As a mastering engineer, I work on recordings from pretty much every level of experience. You're probably recording too hot.

http://www.massivemastering.com/blog/index_files/Proper_Audio_Recording_Levels.php

Related:  Mixing and MikingMusic Production

Audio Recording Center: Electric Guitar Tips Article I'm always amazed by how many people working in home studios think you need a $750,000 console, a 48-track digital machine, an arsenal of $2,000 microphones, and tons of outboard gear to make your tapes sound "professional." It's just not true. What you need is some basic knowledge about the physics of audio (most of which you can learn by dropping a pebble in a puddle of water), and some pretty basic and inexpensive equipment. This is especially true for recording the electric guitar. Five Creative Uses Of Loudspeakers That Can Enhance Recordings 1) Adding More Snares to Snare Drums If you’re presented with an “inherited recording” to mix (one you didn’t engineer) with live drums where no bottom mic was used on the snare drum, or the track sheet says “snare” but all you’ve got to work with is a dull thump, try this: Route an aux send bus output from your mixing console to a small powered loudspeaker (or, if you have an extra power amp, a regular small passive loudspeaker) you’ve placed out in the studio room or vocal booth. I’ve done this, putting my small, powered 5-inch Yamaha loudspeaker right on top of a decent sounding snare drum sitting on its stand. Use a spacer so the loudspeaker itself does not dampen the snare drum head too much.

How to Release an Indie Album Posted: September 23, 2009 at 10:19 pm | Tags: amazon, independent music, indie music, itunes, music business, release an album, solo album, start a record label, tunecore [NOTE: This article is now four years old, and thus horrendously out of date. I mean, it doesn't even mention crowdfunding! So, due to its continued popularity, and the increasingly complex issue, rather than update this article I have decided to publish my first ebook! Watch this space for more details in the coming weeks.] When I first looked up info on how to distribute my album online, the overwhelming number of sites I found almost caused my brain to blow a fuse.

7 Obscure Mixing Techniques Used by the Pros Most of the time there is an obvious choice. Need more mid-range? Grab an EQ and boost the midrange. Need more control of the source? Volume automation or compression. Easy. Ten Tips For Better Drums Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Bruce Aisher runs through ten essential tips for getting the most from your drums. Sub-mix Compression While there is often a lot of focus on compressing individual sounds or even the whole mix, there’s also a place for something that sits firmly in the middle: sub-mix compression (sometimes referred to as ‘bus’ compression). Compressing individual drums can give definition to each element, but compressing all of them together can act like a sonic gel, and may also improve the overall groove, giving the whole drum part a better ebb and flow.

Cornell Electroacoustic Music Center One of the explicit goals of CEMC is to incite users to develop their own working methods and creative procedures. Part of this is accomplished through information provided in lectures and in your time engaging the software available in the studios. But as time goes by you will want to build your own software toolkit. How to Manage & Minimize Latency in Your Audio Projects Whatever genre you are working in and whatever DAW you use to produce your music, it is likely you have suffered from latency issues at some point. Whether you are aware of it or not latency can be a real problem in the modern digital studio and can really effect your workflow. To help you tackle this tricky subject I’ll break it down into easy segments, starting with what latency actually is and following onto subjects such as optimizing your system and how to tackle latency throughout your workflow.

The 10 best lectures on electronic music ever; watch them now Thanks to the wonders of the internet, one’s quest for knowledge really has no limitations. Between the plethora of digitized articles, documentaries, and—on the technical side of things—instructional videos and guides around, there is no shortage of information accessible to those who seek to learn more about the ever-expanding world of electronic music. The lecture, however, makes for a unique form of information sharing as it not only provides the necessary facts and details, but also allows for attendees (and, eventually, viewers) to get a sense of the person behind these facets of knowledge. With that in mind, Beatport News has compiled what we believe are 10 amazing lectures on electronic music, gathering videos from modern innovators, dance music originators, technical wizards, and a few that simply capture a time and place in electronic music too perfectly to overlook. Below are our 10 picks guaranteed to teach every electronic music enthusiast and music maker something new.

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