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The Historical Marker Database

The Historical Marker Database

http://www.hmdb.org/

Related:  SOCIAL STUDIES - American HistoryDigital teaching resourcesGenealogy Research

a Program of the National Park Service NEW! Arthurdale: A New Deal Community Experiment Explore Arthurdale, West Virginia, and discover a town founded during the Great Depression when First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt championed subsistence homestead communities for struggling Americans across the country. In this lesson, learn about the impoverished Appalachian mining town that Arthurdale's homesteaders left and the Progressive-era theories about communal work, school, and rural life they tested at their new home. Primary Sources on the Web: Finding, Evaluating, Using This brief guide is designed to help students and researchers find and evaluate primary sources available online. Keep in mind as you use this website, the Web is always changing and evolving. If you have questions, please consult your instructor or librarian. Primary sources are the evidence of history, original records or objects created by participants or observers at the time historical events occurred or even well after events, as in memoirs and oral histories. Primary sources may include but are not limited to: letters, manuscripts, diaries, journals, newspapers, maps, speeches, interviews, documents produced by government agencies, photographs, audio or video recordings, born-digital items (e.g. emails), research data, and objects or artifacts (such as works of art or ancient roads, buildings, tools, and weapons). These sources serve as the raw materials historians use to interpret and analyze the past.

Legacy News: Using the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Online Catalog for Research With the growing size of digital collections now available, an online catalog is simply no longer just a research tool. They are now online databases where you can do original research. I have used numerous online images from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) catalog in past Legacy News posts as examples of documents that may include an ancestor. OurStory : About A project of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, OurStory is designed to help children and adults enjoy exploring history together through children’s literature, everyday objects, and hands-on activities. Teaching History through Children's Literature Learn more about the OurStory: History Through Children’s Literature programs for families. Find out how you can participate! Learn more » A Proven Strategy Learn about the goals and successes of our program. Read more » Teaching Methods Hands-on learning and literature are powerful tools in engendering a love of history in children. Learn more » Spread the Word About OurStory Find a printable flyer and a special offer to help tell your students and library patrons about OurStory.

Making of America aking of America (MoA) is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th century imprints. For more details about the project, see About MoA. Making of America is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. A timeline of wars of the United States For most of its nearly two and a half century history, the United States has been at war. Some of these wars, like the American Civil War, were terrible and bloody and well-remembered. Others, like the Powder River War, were small and mostly forgotten. One was the result of an individual military officer disregarding orders and invading Mexico to retrieve stolen cattle. The consistency of war, and the dissimilarities of the impact and cost of each war, tend to lead to framing war in terms of casualties.

Searching Ancestry databases Since Ancestry remains the primary website online for genealogists, I’d like to share a few tips for researching its databases. For the first example, below you’ll see the search page for a typical database, this one for Maryland Marriages, 1667-1899: Most people would put the names of their ancestors in the search box, and if the search came up empty, they’d conclude the marriage record wasn’t there. That’s a big mistake. For Teachers The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom.

Parable of the Polygons - a playable post on the shape of society This is a story of how harmless choices can make a harmful world. These little cuties are 50% Triangles, 50% Squares, and 100% slightly shapist. But only slightly! Black Lives Matter Movement Demonstrators filled the Mall of America rotunda and chanted “Black lives matter” to protest police brutality, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2014, in Bloomington, Minn. The group Black Lives Matter Minneapolis had more than 3,000 people confirm on Facebook that they would attend. Attendance figures weren’t immediately available. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Aaron Lavinsky) How to Add Sources on FamilySearch.org Since Family Tree is a collaborative tree and we all share the same ancestors, it’s important to verify the information you enter and provide sources to show others where your information came from. On FamilySearch’s Family Tree, now it’s easy to attach actual images of the sources. Here are the most common scenarios and some tips to help: A) Adding sources to individuals from the Person screen. Perhaps the most basic way to add a source is by attaching one you already have to an individual on the Tree. For example, I have a scanned copy of the birth certificate of my great-great-great-grandfather, Edmond Harris, that I would like to attach to him.

Remembering Pearl Harbor: The USS Arizona Memorial Today the battle-scarred, submerged remains of the battleship USS Arizona rest on the silt of Pearl Harbor, just as they settled on December 7, 1941. The ship was one of many casualties from the deadly attack by the Japanese on a quiet Sunday that President Franklin Roosevelt called "a date which will live in infamy." The Arizona's burning bridge and listing mast and superstructure were photographed in the aftermath of the Japanese attack, and news of her sinking was emblazoned on the front page of newspapers across the land. The photograph symbolized the destruction of the United States Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor and the start of a war that was to take many thousands of American lives. Indelibly impressed into the national memory, the image could be recalled by most Americans when they heard the battle cry, "Remember Pearl Harbor." More than a million people visit the USS Arizona Memorial each year.

The Persistence of Myth: The Causes of the Civil War Although there is little controversy among historians about the centrality of slavery in causing the Civil War, the myth of a “debate” persists. And with President Trump’s recent, historically inaccurate comments about the Civil War, this issue has once again been dragged into the spotlight, galling historians and history teachers. The notion that there is any controversy only serves to advance the ideology of white nationalists and so-called Lost Causers. In promoting this “alternative” view, these groups seek to undermine the role of slavery in secession, in the development of American capitalism and even in the creation of the United States. As historian James W.

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